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Sociology Essay Examples

Essays on Sociology

Sociology as social science plays a big role in the lives of everyone in society. Learning the true meaning of what sociology is has helped me view another person’s cultural biases and experiences in society and understand it, although their sociological perspectives may be quite different than mine. A couple of the major themes that helped me understand others more, were the topics on racial and ethnic inequality and religion. I live in a place where everyone is of the same race and has similar religious views, so at times it can be hard to understand others’ lives outside of where I live. The idea of race/ racism has shown me how wrong people can be when defining “race”, and they can be the same way with others’ religious beliefs. The difference in people’s religious views and race can bring much-unwanted diversity to society.

Sociology of popular television
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'If the Judaic God had created a world as an advanced industrial civilization from scratch (s)he would probably have spent the seventh day in front of the television set' (McGuigan, 1992: 129) Quotes such as this go some way to illustrating the dominance and intrinsic nature of television in our modern lives. Indeed, Gell's (1986; cited in Morley, 1992) account of Sri Lankan fisherman who, at great cost, purchase television sets to be displayed as status symbols [despite the lack of an…...
PhilosophyScienceSociologyTelevision
Closing the Cross Generational Communication Gap
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Abstract This research paper will examine the multi-generational workforce which includes Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y (better known as Millennials) and the Z generation. An examination of each generational group will include their general characteristics, values and preferred methods of communication, in an effort to identify effective methods necessary to close the communicational gap that exists in today’s workforce. We have a very diverse workforce ranging from baby boomers to Z generation, and it is imperative that we find…...
Baby BoomersGenerationMillennial GenerationNew Generation Vs Old Generation
The Baby Boomer Generation
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The term “Baby Boomer” came from the fact that in the first year of the baby boom, 1946, there were about 2.4 million babies born, by the end of the era in 1964 there about 72.5 million baby boomers. An interesting fact is that Bill Clinton was the first baby boomer to serve as president and George W. Bush, Barack Obama and Donald Trump are all baby boomers. To be classified as a baby boomer you have to have been…...
Baby BoomersGeneration
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Civic Engagement and Education
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What is civic engagement? Do you civically engage yourself in your community? What leads one to do so? Civic engagement is any individual or group activity addressing issues of public concern. Some might think people civically engage out of compassion for others, or to feel good about themselves. However, the several studies discussed in this essay reveal the reason why; people civically engage themselves more so in correlation to the level of education they have attained, as well as their…...
EducationSociology
Social Security in the Hands of Baby Boomers
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Starting at a young age, people are told to respect their elders and take care of them. From helping them down the stairs to paying social security, younger generations take on the responsibility to care for older generations. Baby Boomers are a group of people that were born during the time period of 1946 to 1964 (US History). Once Baby Boomers head out of the workforce and into retirement, younger generations will not be able to keep up with what…...
Baby BoomersNew Generation Vs Old Generation
What is Sociological Imagination
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Some individuals stay confined in the borders they place around themselves, thinking only of themselves and their current issues. Therefore, they completely disregard what is happening in society. One can assume that these types of individuals do not, or may never have the sociological imagination. The sociological imagination is having an open-mindedness that allows one to place themselves in another’s shoes. In other words, it is having the capability to understand the history and events that have impacted the lives…...
Sociological ImaginationSociology
Social Disorganization and Over the Hedge
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Social disorganization theory first came to life in the Chicago school of thought with Robert Park. It was expanded on by Shaw and McKay, two of Park’s students. Social disorganization theory was founded on two key concepts: that this theory does not refer to all crime, and ecological factors foreshadow crime. In order to understand this theory on crime one must first understand ecology, which is a subset of biology that deals with studying how living things interact in their…...
Social Learning TheorySocial StudiesSociology
Growing Up in the 1950s
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Our assignment was to imagine life as a child in the Cold War era and choose a decade. I decided to choose the 1950’s because its one of my favorites! Growing up in the 1950s was relatively good. The scientific and technological advancements that currently exist did not exist then, but it was a relatively good time to live in. The world had just come out of World War II. The loss of life was alarming with the majority of…...
1950SGenerationGeneration Gap
Millennials: A Great Generation
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When people hear the word millennials older generations usually panic, and get worked up. Millennials are known for their bad reputation. But this is untrue, this younger generation is the best. Despite what they have done to better today's society older generations still accuse the millennials of being lazy, narcissistic, and good for nothing. But older generations do not want to acknowledge that millennials are actually most concerned about lifelong learning. Lifelong learning is the pursuit of knowledge and skills…...
GenerationMillennial GenerationSociology
Defining Characteristics of Millenials Generation
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The generation of millennials has been very unique compared to past generations due to growing up with technology, also the parents of the millennials have protected them too much from facing any difficulty in their lives. Millennials have grown up during a time that is full of technology. Millennials are a self-absorbed generation. The millennial generation only cares about themselves. Millennials parents are worse than them sometimes due to their parents doing everything for them. Parents have been present at…...
GenerationMillennial GenerationSociology
Generational Insight on Depression
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Abstract This paper explores the shift in stigma on depression between generations. According to a survey conducted by Mental Health America (MHA), Americans are more knowledgeable about mental health illnesses now, than they were in the past, there is still a vast proportion of people still uncomfortable with the idea of a mental health illness (2007).The research group conducted this project with intentions to examine differences in levels of stigma between the older generation (ages 39-45) and the younger generation…...
Depression DisorderGenerationMental HealthMental Illness
Ethnocentrism in the Movie “Crash”
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The movie “Crash” was directed by Paul Haggis in 2004 to depict common sociological phenomena in modern man. The characters in the film revealed the implications of stereotypes, discrimination, and prejudice to different races and ethnicities. Instead of focusing on a single character, the movie is narrated from the perspectives of several characters who originate from diversified ethnic backgrounds. With that said, it can be deduced that ethnocentrism was a key theme in the film. Ethnocentrism is defined as the…...
CrashMovieRacism And DiscriminationSocial IssuesSociology
The Development of Serial Killers
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The definition of a serial killer is traditionally noted as a person who has a particular psychological motivation for killing. The murders are usually performed uniquely and the killer has a signature that they are often known for. Serial killers are often compared to mass murderers; however, serial killers do not typically follow the mass murderer format where there are no breaks in between the murders. Serial killers tend to have characteristics that highlight the fact that they are murderers.…...
DevelopmentPersonality DisorderPsychologySerial KillerSociology
Millennials in the Workplace
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After being introduced to the topic of Millennials in the Workplace, it is best to say that the workplace should adapt to accommodate the needs and ideals of the millennials because they are the future of this planet right? They have proven to be the most educated generation despite experiencing hard times. They still face criticism from their elders because of their work ethic. Although they seem to all be lazy and not interested in working, many millennials are not…...
InnovationMillennial GenerationWork EthicWorkplace
The American Dream of the Nineteenth Century
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Introduction The American dream of the nineteenth century was marked by a heightened sense of individualism and self-interest—a natural response to America's relatively new freedom from British rule. The Declaration Of Independence protects this American Dream . It uses the familiar quote: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.' The term, 'American…...
American DreamLiteratureMark TwainNew Generation Vs Old GenerationPhilosophy
The Difference Between Sociology and the Common Sense
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The difference between sociology and the common sense and the distinction between social science and sociological approach will be earnestly discussed in considerable depth in this essay. I will also state the various aspects of common sense and sociology, as well as different approaches of sociological approaches, sociological perspective, sociological explanation and social science. Sociology and other social sciences are primarily focused on a controversial study of certain unique characteristics of human behaviour with something we all have typically experienced.…...
Common SensePhilosophyPsychologyScienceSocietySociology
Social Norms and Deviance in Society
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Abstract Deviance involves the rebellion from the generally accepted social norms. An individual is said to be deviant if he/she is found culpable of violating either the formal or informal rules prevailing in a certain society. Formal rules comprise primarily of the officially enacted laws. Informal rules are the rules that prevail in a society but are not provided for in the official laws. Deviance varies from one society to the other. Knowledge from Sociology has come in handy to…...
Social NormsSocietySociology
Engaging the Sociological Imagination
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The sociological imagination is the practice of being able to “think ourselves away” from the familiar routines of our daily lives to look at them with fresh, critical eyes (Ashley Crossman 2018). Mills who formed this concept defined the sociological imagination as “the vivid awareness of the relationship between experience and the wider society” (C. Wright Mills 1959). As individuals we tend to face issues and push them into blaming ourselves, not thinking that there are social forces around us…...
EducationPhilosophySociological ImaginationSociologyUniversity
The Concept of The Sociological Imagination
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The book The Sociological Imagination was written by an American sociologist C. Wright Mills in the year 1959. Mills was the first sociologist to coin and use the concept of sociological imagination. Later this became the keystone concept in the branch of sociology. He defines sociological imagination as the “vivid awareness of the relationship between experiences and wider society”. He describes it as the ability to see things socially and guides us on how to interact and influence each other.…...
PhilosophyScienceSocial scienceSociological ImaginationSociology
What Is Sociological Imagination And How Can You Use It?
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The sociological imagination is a capacity, ability, and quality of mind that allows an individual to understand and connect his or her life with the forces and dynamics that impact it. The sociological perspective or in the other words sociological imagination helps people see through a bordering scope of society. Being a small part of the general category of society, exactly working-class adult, student, or someone else you should view the world through by society. My socialization agent belongs to…...
EducationGenderSociological ImaginationSociologyUniversity
C. Wright Mills On the Sociological Imagination
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The concept of sociological imagination was created by an American sociologist C. Wright Mills when he published his book, ‘The Sociological Imagination’ in 1959. Mills wanted to challenge the leading ideas within sociology. “The sociological Imagination is defined as the ability to understand one’s own issues are not caused simply by one’s own beliefs or thoughts but by society and how it is structured.” (Mills, The Sociological Imagination, 1959). Sociological imagination is the ability to see how society is integrated…...
SocietySociological ImaginationSociology
The Sociological Imagination Today
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The sociological imagination is defined as the ability to understand one’s own issues are not caused simply by one’s own belief or thoughts but by society and how it is structure. (Mills, The sociological Imagination 1959). As individuals we tend to face issues and push them into blaming ourselves, not thinking that there are social forces around us in society that have an impact on our breakdowns, emotionally and physically. At the same time, these social forces build us up…...
EducationMindPsychologySociological ImaginationSociologyUniversity
Defining the Sociological Imagination
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Introduction We owe the term sociological imagination to C Wright Mills who is an author of a book of the same title. This essay will discuss drug addiction in the lives of university students. Sociological imagination will assist in unpacking this problem. Definition of terms According to C Wright Mills sociological imagination is the ' vivid awareness of the relationship between experience and the wider society. ...enables us to grasp history and biography and the relations between the two in…...
HealthSociological ImaginationSociologySubstance Abuse
The Professional Thief
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Osborn & West (1979) found that 40% of sons of criminal fathers were criminal, compared to only 13% who had non-criminal fathers. This is consistent with most family studies, but the evidence is insufficient to 'prove' the heritability of criminal behaviour. Family studies have numerous methodological problems; for instance, it is impossible to separate genetic and environmental contributions to behaviour (Raine 1993). Most researches tend to investigate twin and adoption studies, when seeking a biological answer for criminality. Twin studies…...
ChildrenGeneticsSocial Learning TheorySocietySociological TheoriesSociology
The Golden Bough
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The realms of magic, religion and science appear to have been entangled if one analyzes the ancient or primitive worlds of mankind. If someone is bold enough to attempt to define each of the terms, one may find that certain events or actions may be applied to more than one of the definitions, which obviously causes problems in their distinctions. For example, Iroquois Indians would remedy scurvy with the bark of an Arbor tree. In their social setting, a magical…...
BeliefSocial Life Of Human BeingSocial scienceSocietySociology
Suicide – A Study in Sociology
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Emile Durkheim is known for many sociological theories and concepts, such as social solidarity, which although seen in his study of suicide, exists independently of it. However, he is most famed for his classic methodological - and rather positivist - work, Suicide: A Study in Sociology (First published in 1897). The dictionary definition of suicide is "the intentional killing of oneself" (Marshall, 1998). However, Durkheim believed that it took more than this to properly define this action, stating, "... suicide is…...
PhilosophyPsychologyScienceSociologySuicide
The concept of “thick description”
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The concept of 'thick description' The aim of this paper is to assess the concept of 'thick description'. In order to do this, I will look at the way in which anthropological study was carried out prior to this relatively new concept. I will then discuss some of the sociologists such as Weber, Ryle and Geertz and their contributions that have influenced this topic. I aim to conclude by showing whether or not 'thick description' is a new method of…...
LinguisticsPhilosophical TheoriesSociological TheoriesSociology
Social Capital
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The erosion of social capital remains one of the issues that need to be addressed by political and social scientists today. With the increasing diversity in different societies, the problem becomes more imminent as each one tries to conform to the norms and rules of society. In the end, by addressing these inefficiencies, better outcomes can be exhausted by individuals, groups and organizations which can boost efficiency in outputs and objectives. In understanding the definition of social capital, one must…...
EconomicsPollutionSociology
Reliability and validity of obsevation
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Interpretivists place great importance on an observer not disturbing the normal social routine of a group, but the presence of an observer is more likely than not to affect peoples' behaviour. This is particularly a problem with overt observation, because if the group knows that they are being observed, then they are quite likely to change their behaviour. Although covert observation may make this less likely, there is still the chance of a group changing their behaviour due to the…...
PsychologyResearchScienceScientific methodSociology
What is abnormality?
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When does a problem become a problem? When considering how to address the issue of abnormality, the arena is such a complex and vast issue thus it would be necessary to assign the essay towards addressing the historical background of abnormality. The primary question which needs to be explored and analysed is 'what is abnormality?' Such a definition has inspired many conflicting debates within the realm of psychology as there exists no agreed definition. Therefore to address the essay question…...
BehaviorBeliefSocial scienceSociological TheoriesSociology
In sociology there is individu
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In sociology there is individual’s private issues and public issues which connect with Sociological imagination the concept by C. Wright Mills and it have interlink with unemployment. Mills elaborate sociological imagination as the ‘the vivid awareness of the relationship between experience and wider society and to think yourself away from the familiar retinue of everyday life’. This essay will apply the sociological imagination to unemployment. Firstly, it will discuss unemployment. Secondly it will describe the causes of unemployment. thirdly, it…...
Sociology
Hume’s Treatise
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Treatise of Human Nature In the Treatise of Human Nature, Hume argues that reason is a slave to passion by attempting to dispose of three traditional philosophical beliefs. He argues that reason cannot motivate us to act, that reason cannot combat passion and that a passion cannot be called unreasonable. However, Hume also goes back and highlights pieces of the traditional arguments that he believes to be reasonable in certain contexts. After briefly outlining his contrary ideas, I will focus…...
Philosophical TheoriesPsychologySocial Life Of Human BeingSociology
Group Effectiveness
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From the human resources approach, work groups are viewed as quite capable of helping improve organizational efficiency and organization should be designed to utilize the work team whenever possible. Managers should be well equipped to use the newly emerging organization design to bring team to the point where they are entirely responsible for operations in their own areas, Guest (1979), Muncshus III (1983) and Yager (1979). The approach also assumes teams are capable of handling high level decisions and responsibilities.…...
ManagementSociological TheoriesSociology
Generation and Gender in The Prisoner Of The Mountains
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The purpose of this essay will be to look at the film 'Prisoner of the Mountains' and try to define whether there is a relationship between nationality, generation and gender. 'Prisoner of the Mountains' tells the story of two Russian soldiers whom after an ill fated patrol are captured by Chechen rebels and held hostage. The soldier's dislike of each other is clear to see from the start with them being of completely different experience and background. Zhilin (played by…...
GenderGenerationPrison
Gamer Generation
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The book “Got Game; How the Generation is reshaping Business Forever by John Beck and Mitchell Wade explains and promises how players will be able to learn skills from video games and how these can be utilize as businesses. At the same time how businesses can harness these skills and the way gamer idiosyncrasies shape the business. (Beck,Wade 2004) However, as I content analyze the book what it gave me is the notion that it offers hyperbolic claims on how…...
GenerationVideo Game
The functionalist perspective and the conflict perspective
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The two main perspectives that one can sociologically understand culture is though the functionalist perspective and the conflict perspective. Functionalist sociologists argue that society is a whole and consists of several independent parts[s2]. This can be proved because the functionalist perspective focuses in social institutions. Institutions in this respect is defined as a pattern of shared and stable behavior. This institutions are patterns of behavior that is carried out by large numbers of people and is such as religion, work…...
ConflictPhilosophySociology
Elementary Forms of Religious
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The understanding of religion and its importance to society Throughout history there have been many scholars who in one way or another have contributed to the understanding of religion and its importance to society. However there is one man who stands out from this extraordinary bunch by the name of Emile Durkheim. This French sociologist is not only known for his principal of modern social science but is also associated with the finding of the basics of religion and its…...
ReligionSocietySociological TheoriesSociology
When should we discard explanations that are intuitively appealing?
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For example, if someone playfully punched their friend's arm to emphasize a joke, a bystander could possibly misinterpret that playful gesture as a malicious one. This bystander neither understands the context of the punch nor the two people who were active participants in this exchange, therefore, the bystander would give an inaccurate account of what had happened based upon their incorrect intuition about what they saw. There are also other cases in which perception would be skewed to the point…...
PhilosophySocietySociology
Demographic Factors
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Many developing nations are experiencing rapid increases in population size, which gives researchers the reason to talk about the overpopulation and its impact on poverty. This, for instance, is the case in Haiti where a large population density has contributed to the depletion of the island’s scarce resources. In underdeveloped nations, the population increase that was experienced by the developed nations much earlier is happening at this time. The population explosion Since the end of the nineteenth century, the death…...
Population GrowthPovertySocial Life Of Human BeingSocial Problems In Our SocietySocietySociology
Relative and Progressive Deprivation
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Progressive deprivation This sort of deprivation is generally associated with societies that are undergoing rapid social and economic alterations. Progressive deprivation is also known as the J-curve model and is used to describe a situation in which rising expectations are matched by rising capabilities for a short period of time. However, over time a gap starts to develop between the value expectations and capabilities (Gurr and Robert, 1971:53). Relative deprivation Relative deprivation intensity varies depending on a variety of factors…...
Social Life Of Human BeingSocial Problems In Our SocietySocietySociology
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Society That Practices Discrimination Fails

Throughout this course, racial and ethnic inequality has to do with many parts that contribute to sociology and my life. Race and ethnicity affect society today and Arnold Rose described four of the main issues that are related to racism. His first one included that “A society that practices discrimination fails to use the resources of all individuals”(Schaefer). Meaning that even though people might be of a different race or ethnicity doesn’t mean they are any different from what is considered “normal,” everyone has something great that they can contribute to society or even their community. The second dysfunction described that discrimination will most likely raise the rates of social issues in society. Number three stated that “Society must invest a good deal of time and money to defend its barriers to the full participation of all members”(Schaefer).

White Privilege Issue

In a lighter version, this would mean that society should spend the same amount of effort and money on everyone so that everyone in that society can show their greatest potential. And lastly, the fourth dysfunction contributed to racism is that racism at often times will decrease the alliances between other countries. Although it isn’t as much of a problem today, the term“white privilege” can still play a big role in those of the lives who are white. Many of those who aren’t in the white race will still use that term today in bigger cities, with more differentiated races. I used to live in a big city in Florida and a majority of the time when a white person got something first or better than an African American (without the thought of being racist), some African American’s would still get offended and use the terms “white privilege” or “that’s racist.” Which a big majority of the time, there was no racism involved, it was used to get their way, and that is terrible. “Whiteness does carry privileges to a much greater extent than most white people realize”(Schaefer). These types of comments don’t occur much in the Upper Peninsula because around eighty-percent of the Upper Peninsula is of the white race.

Another factor that has a great effect on society is religion and the different kinds that people practice. Emile Durkheim had a great influence on the sociological impact on religion.

Emile Durkheim defined religion as an “ununified system of beliefs and practices relative to sacred things”(Schaefer). Durkheim projected three functions of religion for members of society/ The functions of religion for society members was that it provides social control to uphold religious-based morals and standards to help keep up conformity and control in society, it gives social unity to maintain social solidarity through shared ceremonies, beliefs, and worships. One last function is that it offers reason and meaning in reply to any existing questions. Religion has a great effect on societies and communities and how they function as a whole. The town I live in is quite small and throughout the community, everyone is either Christian or Catholic (both religions are quite similar), so there isn’t much religious diversity and that helps keeps our community together as a whole. Although, in bigger cities, there is much ethnic, racial and religious diversity. For example, in the town that I lived in, in Florida, there was a church of Scientology (which is much like a cult) that ended up taking up a majority of the downtown area and that made some individuals angry. I remember there were many riots and marches to remove that church and move all the members of it to a different area because it was affecting tourist attractions. Diversity like this can completely destroy society.

Community

At the end of this course, I have found myself looking at other’s lives through a different perspective. I’ve also looked at my community from a different perspective as well. It has taught me to better understand my community with how groups of people from all over interact with each other and act the certain way that they do. Additionally, sociology has taught me how different backgrounds either bring society together or breaks it apart, and this has a lot to do with their racial, ethnic and religious background. One of the main concepts of this class that I found most useful to me were the different sociological perspectives, which were the Conflict Theory, Structural functionalism, and Symbolic interactionalism. Breaking them down into macro and micro levels of each perspective, where Structural functionalism and Conflict Theory were on the larger scale of things, or the macro level, which were perspectives more on society. Whereas, Symbolic interactionalism was in the micro-level or smaller scale of things, where one would look at groups or behavior.

Why Learning Sociology is Important

These perspectives helped me better-understand each lesson and which perspective I should understand them through, or even think about which perspectives others would look at scenarios through. Furthermore, I have learned so much about different people and societies. It has reinforced and broadened my knowledge about the diversity in not only my community but this entire world. This was influenced mainly by the multiple perspectives that people have on societies and others. Besides the perspectives, learning about religion, culture, beliefs, family, ad education has also played a big factor in how much my knowledge was reinforced. Most of the information from taking this course plays along with the psychology class that I took through LSSU last year. This being that psychology is a science on the mind and sociology is a science on society, which are both social sciences. That course taught me the different ways that a human’s mind works and develops over time and this course taught me how different people fit into society today. Overall, I am satisfied with the knowledge that I gained from taking this class and I know that it will help me understand people for the rest of my life, and it gives me an interest in a future in social science and work.

FAQ about Sociology

What is Sociological Imagination
...The true meaning of having a sociological imagination, aspects that lead Mill’s to believe that Coontz has the sociological imagination, and reason as to why Coontz’s work may or may not be overlooked by an individual lacking the sociological ima...
What Is Sociological Imagination And How Can You Use It?
...In conclusion, my sociological imagination brought me where I am today. As being humans, we can not let our social location determine our abilities. We must explore beyond where we are and what we are given by life. Humans must defeat their ordinary ...
What is abnormality?
...Is a question, which indeed encompasses wide disagreement and a challenge to provide a definition, which is widely accepted. The Oxford Dictionary defines abnormality as something which is "not normal" (Oxford Dictionary, 2001), but such definition i...
When should we discard explanations that are intuitively appealing?
...Who is to say what is ethical or not? An intuitively appealing thought is always open to several interpretations. Though some explanations seem intuitively appealing, they are always limited due to the nature of humanity itself. Whether it is because...

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