Literature Essay Examples

Literature

Discrimination in America
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The United States of America, a melting pot of different cultures, religions, races and ethnicities. Despite being called “United” discrimination in America goes back to the beginning of the foundation of this country. America was built by the labor of African American slaves. After emancipation, African Americans were segregated based on the 1896 Supreme Court’s case “Plessy vs Ferguson” which made segregation constitutional as long as there were “Separate but equal” areas in facilities. This wasn’t the case as there…...
The Problem of Human Alienation
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Alienation is a very important issue in 21st C society that has the potential to affect anybody. Alienation is present in school, work, and other settings in life, and it is experienced by many people around the world. Alienation also means choosing not to be with anyone because of the feeling that you do not fit in. It is defined as the state of being an outsider or the feeling of being isolated from society. This condition may be caused…...
Alienation Through the Eyes of Brent Staples
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In “Black Men and Public Space” (1986) by Brent Staples (born in 1951) we are told Staples story of life as a black man and his experiences with stereotypes as well as his changes in behavior for a minority community. The theme of Alienation/Otherness through race is the umbrella under which this falls into. We see Staples theme of rave through his use of literary devices as well as his own life experience as a black man dealing with discrimination…...
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Tragic Hero In Oedipus The King and Odyssey
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Although there are some similarities between these two tragic type heroes Odysseus and Oedipus, where Odysseus and Oedipus are just mortal mans who are not particularly strong or beautiful, their value is not necessarily provided on the battlefield or through brute violence, Oedipus King is exemplary from the transition between mythical and rational thinking just like The Odyssey, where the man cannot escape his fate, but it is only his actions that lead to such an outcome. The Odyssey and…...
The Oedipus Rex Cycle As a Tragedy Of Fate
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In several of the works discussed throughout the semester, physical blindness is used to convey the truth that is unacknowledged by a character who is emotionally blind. In order to physically see the truth, one needs to recognize their tragic flaw, and then use this discovery to gain insight on their actions. Within Sophocles series, The Oedipus Cycle, both stories, Oedipus Rex and Antigone, portray a tragic hero who expresses a great deal of emotional blindness which stems from their…...
The Ethical Implications of Human Cloning
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The cloning of animals has been occurring from many years now in the advancement of time, the concept of human reproductive cloning has become a reality as with the breakthrough of biotechnology. Human reproductive cloning is a creation of an individual by nuclear transfer from existing human being to unnucleated ovum of another mammal that give rise to identical individual naturally or artificially. The child has born by this process that comes under new category of human being that is…...
Gothic Elements In The Fall Of The House Of Usher
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In many short stories, the Gothic image is made by the setting of the stories and the characters. The story “The Fall of the House of Usher”, which is written by Edgar Allan Poe, is considered a Gothic story because of the mysterious house and characters. Same goes for the short story “The Monkey's Paw” by W. W. Jacobs, which is essentially a horror chalked full of supernatural imagery and dark imagery. Strong similarities and differences can be seen between…...
How Does Edgar Allan Poe Keep the Reader in Suspense
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The American writer, Edgar Allan Poe, is known for short stories, such as ‘The Fall of the House of Usher’ and ‘The Tell-Tale Heart’. These stories are described as disturbing, even in modern-day society, almost 200 hundred years after having been written. By using a variety of literary devices such as personification, sibilance, imagery along with the use of punctuation, these disturbing stories classify as ‘enjoyable horror’. From the first paragraph of ‘The Fall of The House of Usher’, Poe…...
Incest in “The Fall of the House of Usher”
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“The Fall of the House of Usher” is one of the many short stories written by Edgar Allan Poe, first published the year 1839. This short story belongs to the gothic genre and handles various topics such as illness, family, loneliness, death, weaknesses... Nevertheless, there is a theme in the tale which is not directly mentioned or addressed but insinuated: this is the topic of incest. The purpose of this essay will be to explore the underlying theme of incest…...
Gothicism in The Fall of the House of Usher
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The short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” is a masterpiece of gothic fiction and comprises themes of metaphysical identities, family, madness, and isolation. The literary analysis of Edgar Poe’s story falls under the definition of American gothic fiction. The American Gothic Literature, conferring to the Prentice Hall Literature is categorized by the remote or bleak setting, violent or macabre incidents, and the characters ensuing in physical or psychological torment, or otherworldly involvements or supernatural. The story bearing…...
Anne Sexton’s Cinderella Story
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We have all read a fairytale at least once in our lives and the ending is always the same. There is always something bad that happens but, in the end, everyone lives happily ever after. In Anne Sexton’s poem “Cinderella” there is a twist, she adds her own tale and shakes up the original fairytale. Anne Sexton starts the poem by talking about the original fairy tales. After every fairy tale, she ends it by saying “that story” getting the…...
Reading Report of “The Complete Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde”
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Introduction of the Author The English author Oscar Wilde lived from 1854 to 1900. He was born on October 16th, 1854 in Dublin, Ireland. Wilde was the second son of a distinguished family. His father, Sir William Wilde, was a surgeon, and his mother was a poet and writer. Oscar Wilde was well-educated and graduated from Oxford University. At Oxford, Wilde was influenced by the aesthetic ideas of Walter Pater and John Ruskin, and was exposed to the works of…...
The Truth Under Fairy Tale: The Reflection of The Little Prince
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The Little Prince, the book with most of the human emotions in the world, is just like my life story. Actually, I have read this book several times from the first time I got it at age of 10. The Little Prince, is a fairy tale for children, a fable for adults, a memoir for the old. The author is Antonine de Saint-Exupery from France. It was written in 1942 and published in 1943. The author, Antonine, was an existentialist.…...
Psychological Impact of Fairy Tales on the Mind of Children
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In today’s vain society, is it not refreshing to listen to tales of heroes that confront all adversities with courage, treat all people with kindness? Heroes who don’t give up and receive the rewards they deserve? Some might disagree, but the truth is that such optimism is a necessity in life. (Bettleheim, 1989) states that for children to mature, they need to be educated about the realities of the world, how one has the power to overcome life’s difficulties and…...
Were Romeo and Juliet Victims of Predestination and Fate?
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Fate is something that is destined to happen or turn out in a specific way. It is the one aspect in our lives that sets the path for our lifetime. It cannot be altered or edited no matter what happens, it is just how we are destined to live our lives. It can lead to either destruction and accident or a lifetime full of happiness. Fate plays a major role in the play, Romeo and Juliet, by William Shakespeare. The…...
Emotion, Reason and Fate in Hamlet
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When one loses a loved one, it may take a harsh hit on his or her mind frame. The death of Hamlet's father in Shakespeare's play Hamlet causes several problems, all of which contribute to the tragic death of Hamlet. All the events taking place in the play are impacted by emotion, reason, and fate. Specifically, the events in the play that caused or resulted in Hamlet's downfall are determined by roles of emotion, reason, and fate. These three are…...
The Extent of Destiny: Gods, People, and Fate in The Iliad
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When does fate and when does choice play a role in our lives, or in this world? That question may always be asked but in Homer’s epic poem, The Iliad fate and choice happen often. Throughout The Iliad Homer creates numerous conflicts between not only the mortal Greeks and Trojans but the Gods as well. Though there is a difference between what fate is and what choice is; their similarities coincide with each other. Fate causes one to act in…...
What is the Significance of Fate and Destiny in Romeo and Juliet?
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Some strongly believe that fate plays a role in their lives. They think their life story is written in the stars by fate. In the famous play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, two young characters with rival families fell in love. One person from each family died before Romeo got banished to Mantua. Friar Lawrence, an old friend of Romeo and Juliet, gave Juliet a potion to help her reunite with her love, but his good intentions ended up…...
The Power of Fate in the Oedipus Trilogy
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Fate is clearly defined as, “the will or principle or determining cause by which things, in general, are believed to come to be as they are or events to happen as they do” (Merriam Webster). Throughout the play Oedipus Rex, Oedipus shows his best effort in avoiding the prophecy that said he will one day kill his father and marry his mother. In his effort and making his own decisions, Oedipus ends up fulfilling the prophecy through a series of…...
Postmodernism in Vonnegut’s “Cat’s Cradle”
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Kurt Vonnegut’s Cat’s Cradle is a dystopian novel that begins with the narration by a writer named John, or Jonah, as he asks to be called. John plans to write a book about the day the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. The name of the book is The Day the World Ended. In order to start the recollection of the events that happened that day, he needs to research about the Hoenikker family since Felix Hoenikker was a physicist…...
Dystopia and Society: “Animal Farm” and “Fahrenheit 451”
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Dystopian literature often serves as a warning or prediction of the future, how society would look if it was ruled by a totalitarian government, in the form of fiction. It reveals the true nature of oppression, exploring how the ruling elite uses its power set the status quo, and how society does not question it. Examples of an oppressive society include Joseph Stalin’s Soviet Union, where corruption and abuse of power twist the once ideal society into one that forces…...
George Orwell’s and Margaret Atwood’s Visions of Future Societies
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Margaret Attwood's ‘Handmaid’s Tale’ is a dystopian novel published in 1985. It is set in New England in the future where the handmaids are forced to produce babies for the Commanders and their wives to raise. George Orwell’s ‘1984’ is also a dystopian novel originally published in 1949. In this novel, citizens are taught to love and obey their leader, also known as ‘Big Brother’ who watches and controls everything to the extent that not even their thoughts are safe.…...
Dystopian World in MT Anderson’s Feed
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The feed is a satirical novel set in a dystopian future where MT Anderson offers a thought-provoking and scathing indictment that may prod readers to examine the more sinister possibilities of corporate and media-dominated culture. Anderson draws parallels between our society and that of the Feeds to bring light to recklessness and warn readers of what must be improved if humanity is to survive. He achieves this by juxtaposing the two main characters in the novel, Titus and Violet, and…...
The Handmaids Tale: A Feminist Dystopia
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As a reader, it's our job to know the author's purpose, Margaret Atwood’s book “The Handmaid's Tale” may be a dystopian novel that was published in 1985; during the backlash against the progress of second-wave feminism. To people that don’t know what the second- wave feminism period was, it had been the women's movement of the 1960s and 70s during which women started breaking the ideals of where a lady stands. Margaret Atwood used this point to make a dystopian…...
Dystopian Society and Conformity in The Lottery
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The fictional short story “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, discusses the themes of unjustified crimes and nature of evil in humans. This fictional text depicts a community of villagers who hold as part of their tradition an annual lottery. In this essay, I will discuss how the structure of the fictional world as a Dystopia helps the reader to understand the overall message behind by the implied author’s criticism of the text. Dystopia is a term refers to a fictitious…...
The Tradition-Change Contrast in William Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily
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In his 1930 gothic short story titled “A Rose for Emily”, William Faulkner contrasts the ability and inability of the people in Jefferson to change over the time. The story is set in Jefferson, Mississippi, the fictional small town during the late 1800’s. Through a set of symbolisms, Faulkner narrates the struggle that often comes from trying to maintain tradition in the face of widespread, radical change. The two sets or generations of people contrasted in the narrative are the…...
Feminist Elements in A Rose for Emily
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William Faulkner wrote the story entitled “A Rose for Emily” and was published in the year 1930. The story tells about a woman named Emily who lived in Jefferson. One day Homer Barron came into their town and Emily falls in love with him, but Homer doesn’t want to marry her. Therefore, she killed him and for 40 years she slept beside with the lifeless corpse of her lover. While interpreting this work of Faulkner, this simply tells us about…...
The Structure in William Faulkner’s a Rose for Emily
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A Rose for Emily is a short story by celebrated American author William Faulkner. First published in 1930. It tells the story of one small Mississippi town’s local recluse and is written in Faulkner’s signature non-linear style. 'A Rose for Emily' discusses many dark themes that characterized the Old South and Southern Gothic fiction. The story explores themes of death and resistance to change. Emily Grierson had been oppressed by her father for most of her life and hadn't questioned…...
Reasons of Emily’s Tragic Fate in A Rose for Emily
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In William Faulkner’s novel, “A Rose for Emily” Emily is the title character who is depicted as disillusioned with society, totally withdrawn, and a bit odd and outlandish at times. From what we can tell, she never actually receives any type of treatment for her mental health, but she consistently exhibits numerous systems that might be diagnosed as a psychiatric issue. Through an analysis of Emily’s behavior and her relationships socially, it is evident that she has some type of…...
The Enigma of Emily Grierson
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“A Rose for Emily”, a short story by William Faulkner, is one of the most enduring examples of literature of the early twentieth century. The story has been written through the perspective of a first-person narrator and it is centered on a main character by the name Emily Grierson. Faulkner’s expert usage of a combination of symbolism and imagery manages to capture and hold the attention of readers by portraying Emily as a rather mysterious and grotesque figure. “A Rose…...
William Faulkner’s A Rose For Emily And The Yellow Wallpaper
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A Rose for Emily and The Yellow Wallpaper 'A Rose for Emily'' By William Faulkner and 'The Yellow Wallpaper by Charlotte Perkins Gilman,' are two short stories that both combine qualities of comparable qualities and complexity. Both of the short stories are about how and why these women changed for lunacy. These women are compelled into confinement because of how they are women. Emily's father rejects each and every piece of her mates; the mate of Gilman Narrator (John) withdraws…...
Friar Lawrence is to Blame in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet
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Friar Laurence is the puppet master that’s pulling the strings behind the scenes. Friar Laurence is a Friar and an apothecary in training. He is the one who gave the vial to Juliet, which led to the climax of the play. He also came up with the plans to keep Romeo and Juliet together, such as, “killing Juliet,” until Romeo came and the couple would leave together. Friar Laurence is the most memorable character in the story because he came…...
Who is Most Responsible for the Deaths in William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet
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Introduction The play “Romeo and Juliet”, written by William Shakespeare explores the tragedy of the two main characters, Romeo and Juliet. In the play, there are several characters who contribute to the death of the protagonists. Initially, it is the grudge between the parents that ruin any chance of Romeo and Juliet finding happiness as well as the lack of support of Juliet’s nurse at her time of need. In addition, it is also the reckless and immature plans of…...
Who Could Be Responsible for the Tragic Death of Romeo and Juliet
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Sadly the tale of Romeo and Juliet did not end well. From their families constantly trying to find ways to fight or argue to Romeo getting banned to Mantua for the death of Tybalt. There was just so much drama. .. We also know that the couple ended up dead by the end of the story. So, Who is to blame for their deaths? Benvolio convinces Romeo to go to the ball. If Romeo didn’t attend the ball, he might…...
Causes Of To Blame For Romeo And Juliet
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Romeo and Juliet is a story of two warring families who despise each other. The Montague is the house of Romeo’s. The house of Juliet’s family is the Capulets the play rotates between passionate love scenes to ghastly bloody fight scenes. In the play Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare, it is Tybalt\'s hatred of Romeo that is the cause of all the deaths. Also in the play, there are different types of love such as unrequited love, love at…...
What Characters and Ideas Contribute to the Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet?
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William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet depicts the fatal consequences of Romeo’s and Juliet’s lives. Shakespeare suggests that the “pair of star-crossed lovers” decisions, contribute to their demise. Romeo and Juliet flourished during the Elizabethan era, as it was a period that allowed the arts to prosper through Queen Elizabeth I’s reign control. The play was written in the 16th century, which delineated the four senses of humor that were widespread during the Elizabethan era; melancholy, sanguine, choler, and phlegm are…...
Who Is to Blame for the Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet?
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To Shakespeare’s audience, fate and destiny were both acceptable concepts; unlike today, when something goes wrong the people look for someone or something to blame, instead of believing that the outcome was inevitable. We do not like to think that we aren’t in control of our own lives. In Romeo and Juliet, it is difficult to escape from fate. At the beginning of the play, Romeo and Juliet are described to have “death marked love”, this suggests the play is…...
The Development of John Grady Cole in All the Pretty Horses
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In Cormac McCarthy’s All the Pretty Horses, he uses blood as a unifying concept. John Grady Cole’s devotion is compensated in blood. The brutal image of blood and violence is morbidly displayed throughout the whole novel. It is an important symbol and a repetitive element because it symbolizes the cost John Grady pays for everything he loves. It also represents the world around him and helps to define the attractiveness it has, despite the difference in violence and delicacy. There…...
Conformity vs. Individuality in Fahrenheit 451
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The statement of conformity vs individuality is incredibly intricate, so we must comprehend each word. Merriam Webster accurately defines conformity as “action in accordance with some specified standard or authority” while individuality is defined as “a total character peculiar to a distinguishing an individual from others.”The remarkable book that accurately describes these two words is undoubtedly the book Fahrenheit 451 which was created by Ray Bradbury. In the text, the society that Montag lives in shows that Montag’s individuality triumphed…...
Deja Dead: The Classic Forensic Thriller
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Kathy Reichs, Canada crime. Dr. Temperance Brennan, or Tempe, a forensic anthropologist, that like to search for a crime scene and love to figure out the murderer. But need a break from her job and all of the skeletons, so she plans a vacation to Quebec City, and thought of visiting the Plains of Abraham. But only got a little time for it, after a moment she got call back for a big case, and because of that, she has…...
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FAQ about Literature

How Does Edgar Allan Poe Keep the Reader in Suspense

...'The Use of Imagery, Strong Irony, and Similes in The Tell-Tale Heart, a Short Story by Edgar Allan Poe.' GradesFixer, 22 Oct. 2018, https://gradesfixer.com/free-essay-examples/the-use-of-imagery-strong-irony-and-similes-in-the-tell-tale-heart-...

What is the Significance of Fate and Destiny in Romeo and Juliet?

...In addition to accidents and coincidences being an influence that caused Romeo and Juliet’s death, good intentions were too. Friar Lawrence marrying Juliet and Romeo to end the feud that was going on between the Capulets and Montagues. He said to R...

Who is Most Responsible for the Deaths in William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet

...In summary, the minor characters contribute to the deaths of Romeo and Juliet. As stated previously, if there had not been a feud between the families, none of this would have occurred. Secondly, the lack of support from Juliet’s Nurse in her time ...

Who Could Be Responsible for the Tragic Death of Romeo and Juliet

...The nurse also surprisingly took a role in their deaths. In act three scene five the nurse states “ I think it's best if you married with the county. Oh, he is a lovely gentleman. Romeo's a dishclout compared to him.” The nurse is pressuring Juli...

What Characters and Ideas Contribute to the Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet?

...Ultimately, Shakespeare illustrates the character flaws in Romeo and Juliet that results in devastating consequences, yet end the violence between the Capulets and the Montagues. Romeo and Juliet concludes with tranquillity finally being restored in ...

Who Is to Blame for the Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet?

...Ultimately, fate is the main cause of the tragedy of Romeo and Juliet because most of the main points in the play which lead to their deaths occurred because fat willed it so. the younger generation is least to blame because most of their actions wer...