Sociological Theories Essay Examples

Essays on Sociological Theories

Performativity, Precarity, and Sexual Politics
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Judith Butler’s central mission in her essay, “Performativity, Precarity, and Sexual Politics” is centered around bridging a link between gender performativity and the precarity that results from unconventional means of gender expression. In this essay, Butler emphasizes the influence of politics on these terms and how they relate to one another, making a clear distinction of the greater political forces that reinforce the precarious nature of non-conforming individuals. The concept of precarity of life is further complicated by Julia Serano…...
Short StorySociological Theories
The Color of Water by James McBride
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Ruth's childhood relationship includes a proof of her bitter separation from her family, which explains the family’s avoidance. Despite her contribution to the current book, Ruth refuses from time to time to recall her troubled past. James describes his mother's eccentricities, which can be described as both embarrassing and charming, as he discovers her being dissimilarity from parents' friends and other adults. James also provides one of the aims of this memoir: to look for an explanation of his mother's…...
Short StorySociological Theories
Imagination – Psychological practice and IRB 
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The exposure therapy has been effective for many who face anxiety disorder, there have not been various alternatives of effective tools that help eliminate fear condition associated with certain objects and situations. In the article “Your Brain on Imagination: It’s a Lot Like Reality” takes the fact that nearly 68 year ago, was discovered the first tool for eradicating people’s fear, what now it’s known as “exposure therapy” (University of Colorado at Boulder). Through this process, someone is exposed to…...
SocietySociological Imagination
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Are liberalism and democracy compatible?
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  The individual, its rights and freedom are the essence of liberalism. John Stuart Mill once wrote "Over himself, over his own body and mind, the individual is sovereign". Liberalism is the belief that we are free to make our own mistakes, decide our own lifestyle, choose our own way of living, pursue our own thoughts and philosophies, provided we don't infringe on other people's freedom. It tolerates and respects differing views, and appreciates diversity as essential to social and…...
DemocracyLiberalismPhilosophySociological Theories
The Person I am Today
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My name is Aston Bourne, I was born on April 4th, 2000 in San Jose California. I grew up in a city called Sunnyvale, located in Silicon Valley. I grew up being the oldest of 3 boys, both my parents are from Europe and I am a first-generation American. As I become older and more aware in the early stages of my life, I've been able to relate experiences in my life and the choices I've been given with my…...
CompetitionLifeMy Life ExperiencePersonal ExperienceSocial ClassSociological Imagination
What is Sociological Imagination?
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Some individuals stay confined in the borders they place around themselves, thinking only of themselves and their current issues. Therefore, they completely disregard what is happening in society. One can assume that these types of individuals do not, or may never have the sociological imagination. The sociological imagination is having an open-mindedness that allows one to place themselves in another’s shoes. In other words, it is having the capability to understand the history and events that have impacted the lives…...
Sociological ImaginationSociology
Time Travel and Slavery: Octavia Butler’s Kindred
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Kindred, by Octavia Butler, explores slavery through a time-traveling experience. The main character, Dana, is thrown into the antebellum south during the height of slavery. Dana is a modern-day African American woman living in Los Angeles. While celebrating her twenty-sixth birthday with her husband, Kevin, Dana is abruptly forced to time travel from the year 1976 to a Maryland plantation from 1815. After repeated time travel, it becomes evident that Dana’s time travels are related to her ancestor, Rufus Weylin,…...
Feminism In LiteratureIntersectionalityKindred By Octavia ButlerScience fiction
My Understanding of Intersectional Feminism
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1. What is feminism? What stereotypes surround the word feminist? What is patriarchy? How might someone internalize patriarchal or sexist thinking? How can everyone benefit from feminism? How can we break down the single story of feminism? My definition of feminism always included that it is a fight for women’s rights and equality, but as Bell Hooks stated, a feminist should care about not only feminist theory, but how it relates to race, culture, and class as well (19). To…...
FeminismGender RolesGender StereotypesIntersectionalitySociological Theories
Intersectionality: How Gender Interacts With Other Social Identities
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In Gendering the state: Performativity and protection in international security, Jonathan D. Wadley (2009), speaks of the state as being thought to be largely ungendered by International Relations scholars. Within the article, Wadley mentions that feminists argue that when an entity is considered ‘genderless,’ it is often masculinized, its masculinity made universal, and its theories made partial (while masquerading as impartial). According to Wadley, this ‘genderlessness’ in international relations ignores how key actors are defined and differentiated by gender norms.…...
Gender BiasIntersectionalitySociological ImaginationSociological Theories
Engaging the Sociological Imagination
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The sociological imagination is the practice of being able to “think ourselves away” from the familiar routines of our daily lives to look at them with fresh, critical eyes (Ashley Crossman 2018). Mills who formed this concept defined the sociological imagination as “the vivid awareness of the relationship between experience and the wider society” (C. Wright Mills 1959). As individuals we tend to face issues and push them into blaming ourselves, not thinking that there are social forces around us…...
EducationPhilosophySociological ImaginationSociologyUniversity
The Concept of The Sociological Imagination
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The book The Sociological Imagination was written by an American sociologist C. Wright Mills in the year 1959. Mills was the first sociologist to coin and use the concept of sociological imagination. Later this became the keystone concept in the branch of sociology. He defines sociological imagination as the “vivid awareness of the relationship between experiences and wider society”. He describes it as the ability to see things socially and guides us on how to interact and influence each other.…...
PhilosophyScienceSocial scienceSociological ImaginationSociology
What Is Sociological Imagination And How Can You Use It?
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The sociological imagination is a capacity, ability, and quality of mind that allows an individual to understand and connect his or her life with the forces and dynamics that impact it. The sociological perspective or in the other words sociological imagination helps people see through a bordering scope of society. Being a small part of the general category of society, exactly working-class adult, student, or someone else you should view the world through by society. My socialization agent belongs to…...
EducationGenderSociological ImaginationSociologyUniversity
C. Wright Mills On the Sociological Imagination
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The concept of sociological imagination was created by an American sociologist C. Wright Mills when he published his book, ‘The Sociological Imagination’ in 1959. Mills wanted to challenge the leading ideas within sociology. “The sociological Imagination is defined as the ability to understand one’s own issues are not caused simply by one’s own beliefs or thoughts but by society and how it is structured.” (Mills, The Sociological Imagination, 1959). Sociological imagination is the ability to see how society is integrated…...
SocietySociological ImaginationSociology
The Sociological Imagination Today
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The sociological imagination is defined as the ability to understand one’s own issues are not caused simply by one’s own belief or thoughts but by society and how it is structure. (Mills, The sociological Imagination 1959). As individuals we tend to face issues and push them into blaming ourselves, not thinking that there are social forces around us in society that have an impact on our breakdowns, emotionally and physically. At the same time, these social forces build us up…...
EducationMindPsychologySociological ImaginationSociologyUniversity
Defining the Sociological Imagination
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Introduction We owe the term sociological imagination to C Wright Mills who is an author of a book of the same title. This essay will discuss drug addiction in the lives of university students. Sociological imagination will assist in unpacking this problem. Definition of terms According to C Wright Mills sociological imagination is the ' vivid awareness of the relationship between experience and the wider society. ...enables us to grasp history and biography and the relations between the two in…...
HealthSociological ImaginationSociologySubstance Abuse
The Professional Thief
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Osborn & West (1979) found that 40% of sons of criminal fathers were criminal, compared to only 13% who had non-criminal fathers. This is consistent with most family studies, but the evidence is insufficient to 'prove' the heritability of criminal behaviour. Family studies have numerous methodological problems; for instance, it is impossible to separate genetic and environmental contributions to behaviour (Raine 1993). Most researches tend to investigate twin and adoption studies, when seeking a biological answer for criminality. Twin studies…...
ChildrenGeneticsSocial Learning TheorySocietySociological TheoriesSociology
The concept of “thick description”
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The concept of 'thick description' The aim of this paper is to assess the concept of 'thick description'. In order to do this, I will look at the way in which anthropological study was carried out prior to this relatively new concept. I will then discuss some of the sociologists such as Weber, Ryle and Geertz and their contributions that have influenced this topic. I aim to conclude by showing whether or not 'thick description' is a new method of…...
LinguisticsPhilosophical TheoriesSociological TheoriesSociology
What is abnormality?
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When does a problem become a problem? When considering how to address the issue of abnormality, the arena is such a complex and vast issue thus it would be necessary to assign the essay towards addressing the historical background of abnormality. The primary question which needs to be explored and analysed is 'what is abnormality?' Such a definition has inspired many conflicting debates within the realm of psychology as there exists no agreed definition. Therefore to address the essay question…...
BehaviorBeliefSocial scienceSociological TheoriesSociology
The main idea of Marxism
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The main idea of Marxism is a philosophy of history, outlining why capitalism is doomed and socialism will replace it. He saw this work as a theory of society and a socialist political project. He took a scientific view of history and analysed it using scientific methods. He believed that history had developed through stages - from primitive communism, i. e. tribal societies, through to slavery, then feudalism into capitalism. He then thought capitalism would collapse and society would eventually…...
CommunismMarxismPhilosophical TheoriesPhilosophySociological Theories
Group Effectiveness
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From the human resources approach, work groups are viewed as quite capable of helping improve organizational efficiency and organization should be designed to utilize the work team whenever possible. Managers should be well equipped to use the newly emerging organization design to bring team to the point where they are entirely responsible for operations in their own areas, Guest (1979), Muncshus III (1983) and Yager (1979). The approach also assumes teams are capable of handling high level decisions and responsibilities.…...
ManagementSociological TheoriesSociology
Elementary Forms of Religious
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The understanding of religion and its importance to society Throughout history there have been many scholars who in one way or another have contributed to the understanding of religion and its importance to society. However there is one man who stands out from this extraordinary bunch by the name of Emile Durkheim. This French sociologist is not only known for his principal of modern social science but is also associated with the finding of the basics of religion and its…...
ReligionSocietySociological TheoriesSociology
Assignment About What Is Social Exclusion?
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Introduction For example, it doesn't really explain why individuals are excluded due to their race or sexuality etc. One of the debates regarding social exclusion is whether it is the fault of the excluded, or a result of the social system (structural phenomenon). Both Marx and Weber saw social exclusion as a result of the social system, with people attempting to secure privileged positions for themselves at the expense of the least well off. However some would argue it is…...
GlobalizationIndustrial RevolutionSocial Problems In Our SocietySocietySociological TheoriesSociology
What did Solon achieve?
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Solon 'the reformer' as he was know was an Archon from 594-593bc in the time of the Greeks. He was an elected dictator (aisymnetes) and was placed in power to sort out the ever growing problem that was happening between all social classes. He was chosen for this job due to the fact that he was born into a noble class; though he was perhaps he was a second son but didn't inherit the family estate. He was a trader…...
EconomicsFamous PersonGreece Debt CrisisHistorySocial ClassSociological Theories
The sociological imagination
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According to C. Wright Mills, "the sociological imagination enables us to grasp history and biography and relations between the two within society". Here, Mills is referring to his belief that researchers can view human life as they are shaped by historically conditioned forces - It empowers us to make the connection between personal troubles of a person (these are such issues of personal and private matters) and public issues of the social structure (or 'social problems'). Mills decides that people…...
Social ClassSociological ImaginationSociology
The Iron Cage
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Introduction The Iron Cage theory also rises out of the ever increasing rationalization of modern society. Weber defined 'power' as the "ability to realize one's will despite and against the resistance of others. During Weber's time, he saw an increasing power shift towards the ever growing bureaucracies, these formally rational, complex organizations. Bureaucracies are by nature highly formally rational. They are there for the purpose of organizing what would otherwise be very large or complex organizational tasks which wouldn't be…...
BureaucracySocial scienceSocietySociological TheoriesSociology
The Deindividuation perspective
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Introduction Also Premenstrual syndrome has been cited in criminal trials as a reason for aggressive behaviour. These together with other biological explanations cast doubt on aggression being purely a learned behaviour. The social learning theory itself relies heavily on experimental evidence and field studies in which there are some mythological flaws. For example low ecological validity, after all the Bobo doll was not a living person. Johnson et al found in a similar study that the children who acted more…...
Social Problems In Our SocietySocial scienceSocietySociological TheoriesSociology
The consequences of Modernity
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The terms post-modernity, post-modernism and post-modern have been extremely well documented in the fields of sociology and philosophy. My main aim in this essay is to assess whether or not these concepts are useful in sociological analysis. I also wish to give examples of them and show whether or not there has been any real historical change between the periods of modernity and post-modernity. In order to do this, I will draw upon the works of sociologists such as Stuart…...
Philosophical TheoriesPhilosophyProgressSociological TheoriesSociology
The concept of ethnocentrism
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Introduction Chinese philosopher Confucius stated that "All people are the same; its only their habits that are different". People within the western world are lucky to hold a privileged position within the worlds social system. Everything done by these people stems from the fact that they were brought up in a certain type of society that offers opportunities. "Sociology is - the systematic, sceptical study of human society", (Ken Plummer). So as sociologists it should be remembered that our perspective…...
Social Life Of Human BeingSocial Problems In Our SocietySocial scienceSocietySociological TheoriesSociology
SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION ON UNEMPLOYMENT
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SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION ON UNEMPLOYMENT In sociology there is individual’s private issues and public issues which connect with Sociological imagination the concept by C. Wright Mills and it have interlink with unemployment. Mills elaborate sociological imagination as the ‘the vivid awareness of the relationship between experience and wider society and to think yourself away from the familiar retinue of everyday life’. This essay will apply the sociological imagination to unemployment. Firstly, it will discuss unemployment. Secondly it will describe the causes…...
EmploymentPovertySociological ImaginationSociologyUnemployment
Social traps and dilemmas
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Introduction Such individualism is not unique to the individualistic culture of America. Edney's findings are supported in other cross cultural studies. In Japan, a collectivistic culture, Kaori Sato (1987)vii gave participants opportunities to plant and harvest trees from a simulated forest for money. When the students shared the costs of planting the trees, the result was much like those in Western (individualistic) cultures: trees (the stock) were prematurely harvested before they had grown to their most profitable size. The lack…...
American CultureCriminology TheoriesSociological TheoriesSociology
Social divisions
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Introduction Social divisions are not the same as social differences. Social differences are mostly based on accident of birth. Normally we don't choose to belong to our community. People around us are male or female, they are tall and short, have different kinds of complexions, or have different physical abilities, disabilities but every social difference does not lead to social division. Social differences divide similar people from one another, but they also unite very different people. People belonging to different…...
Social ClassSocial Life Of Human BeingSocial Problems In Our SocietySocial scienceSociological TheoriesSociology
Situational factors
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Introduction When we fail this is not expected and therefore we are more likely to look for causes outside ourselves. However, this explanation is refuted by a the results of a study by Miller (1976) who gave Pps a test of social perceptiveness and then randomly told them that they had either passed or failed. Half were told it was a well standardised and valid assessment and half were told it was a poor assessment. This meant that for those…...
BiasSocial Problems In Our SocietySocietySociological TheoriesSociology
Merton’s Theory of Anomie
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Anomie is a state of normlessness first coined by Robert K Merton, an American functionalist sociologist borrowed Durkheim s concept of Anomie to form his own theory called Strain Theory Merton argued that the real problem is not created by a sudden social change as Durkheim proposed, but rather by a social structure that holds out the sane goals to all its members without giving them equal means of achieving them. It is the lack of combining between what the…...
Philosophical TheoriesSociological TheoriesTheory
Karl Marx and Max Weber
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Karl Marx and Max Weber offer two very different but valid approaches to social class in modern capitalist society. In a capitalist society the private ownership of the means of production is the dominant form of providing the things needed to survive. What distinguishes capitalism from other types of society is the emphasis on the rights of property and the individual owner’s right to employ capital, as she or he thinks fit. Karl Marx’s approach was, at first, the most…...
EconomicsKarl MarxMax WeberPhilosophical TheoriesSociological Theories
Looking At The Problems Of Hegemony Culture Cultural Studies Essay
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Hegemony is the procedures by which dominant civilization maintains its dominant place: for illustration, the usage of establishments to formalise power ; the employment of a bureaucratism to do power look abstract ( and, hence, non attached to any one person ) ; the ingraining of the public in the ideals of the hegomonic group through instruction, advertisement, publication, etc. ; the mobilisation of a constabulary force every bit good as military forces to subdue resistance.In international dealingss, there is…...
CulturePhilosophical TheoriesPhilosophySociological Theories
Individulas and the Sociological Imagination
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Individualism and the Sociological Imagination The belief that the individual controls his destiny and succeeds or fails based on talent, hard work, and perseverance is a central theme in the American way of life. This strong belief in individualism often dictates how Americans explain, and resolve social problems. This view that individuals are solely responsible for their success or failure in life, mostly unaffected by surrounding social forces, runs counter to the sociological imagination. C.Wright Mills considered the sociological imagination…...
IndividualismObesitySociological ImaginationSociology
Compare and Contrast Two Sociological Theories to Crime and Deviance
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Sociological perspectives on society are divided into two areas; Structural and Action Theories. Both these theories aim to describe how society is structured, and what contributes to that make up. This document will look at the structural theories in relation to crime. It aims to show how two sociological theories can be used to analyse crime and give differing views. The structural theory looks at society as a whole. This is called a macro theory as it takes an overall…...
Compare And ContrastCrimeKarl MarxMarxismSocial ClassSociological Perspective
Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Sociological Theory of Human Development
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Human development is one of the most intriguing paradigms in all of science. Human development plays a principal role in the makeup of individuals that populate our nation. Urie Bronfenbrenner (1917-2005) was one of the most influential developmental psychologist, who was known for his groundbreaking contributions with the ecological theory of development. Conceivably, Bronfenbrenner’s levels of influence, the microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem, macrosystem and the chronosystem helped shape my development and influenced my decision to enter graduate school, to obtain a…...
DevelopmentEcologyHumanSociological Theories
A Global Perspective of Identity, Racism, and Belonging
Words • 1500
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Societies develop social standards, stereotypes, or labels to categorize people in, whether that is due to race, gender, social status, etc. These classifications can create injustices like racism and sexism, especially for immigrants. Discussing problems from a removed perspective can be challenging, but it is crucial in addressing these social problems. The novel, Americanah, written by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, creates a platform of dialogue in which she is able to analyze the roots of many of these problems, not only…...
GenderIdentityIntersectionalityOppressionRacismSocial Issues
The decisions we make along with the outcomes are influenced
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The decisions we make along with the outcomes are influenced and shaped by the situations we find ourselves in, the values we have and the behaviors of people around us. The resulting effect of these decisions and actions have an impact on the society, and the study of sociology has given us an edge of understanding as to why things happen the way they do. In this essay, I will use the sociological imagination according to C. Wright Mills, to…...
DecisionsInfluenceOutsourcingSociological ImaginationSociology
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FAQ about Sociological Theories

What is Sociological Imagination?
...The true meaning of having a sociological imagination, aspects that lead Mill’s to believe that Coontz has the sociological imagination, and reason as to why Coontz’s work may or may not be overlooked by an individual lacking the sociological ima...
Intersectionality: How Gender Interacts With Other Social Identities
...Although Wadley makes some valid points, an acknowledgment that war is not only external to the state, the acknowledgment that violence is not only physical, recognition of the influence of religion (and other internal entities) on state priorities, ...
What Is Sociological Imagination And How Can You Use It?
...In conclusion, my sociological imagination brought me where I am today. As being humans, we can not let our social location determine our abilities. We must explore beyond where we are and what we are given by life. Humans must defeat their ordinary ...
What is abnormality?
...Is a question, which indeed encompasses wide disagreement and a challenge to provide a definition, which is widely accepted. The Oxford Dictionary defines abnormality as something which is "not normal" (Oxford Dictionary, 2001), but such definition i...
Assignment About What Is Social Exclusion?
...Despite there being a lot of ambiguity in the term, as Peters (1996) says, "Some reject the term entirely on the grounds that it is 'highly problematic'", the most important thing is that British government is looking at ways to help those who are so...
What did Solon achieve?
...They way in which he decided to sort out all of the problems were not really for a permanent state but instead for a temporary solution to the ever growing problem. Some call him the 'Father' of democracy; I would tend to disagree with this. Admitted...

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