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Against the Odds, and Against the Common Good Essay Review

Paper type: Review
Pages: 3 (603 words)
Categories: American Culture, Critical Thinking, Essay, Government, The Effects Of Gambling
Downloads: 35
Views: 207

In her essay, “Against the Odds, and Versus the Typical Good,” Gloria Jimenez examines the debate for state-run lottos and assumes that state representatives, having people’ well-being in mind, should not pass costs advising them to gamble. In today’s society, state-run lottery games are typical establishments thinking about most of our nation has one. Thirty-nine states and the District of Columbia all have lottery games justified as essential state funds useful to the typical good.

However with state lottos nobody wins– not schools, not the federal government and not the American public. (1) The lottery system does not contribute significant funds to the state or schools (2) it is a regressive kind of taxation (3) it develops limited tasks (4) it is harmful to American values and society (5 )however they claim to be reasonable and honest. In general, lottery games are neither useful nor fair, and they are harmful to the common good. Initially, let me point out that lottery games do not accomplish their first objective of contributing noteworthy funds to the state or schools.

The most legitimate defense for lottos is that they will increase

Educational financing, when, in reality, contributes very little. In her research, Jimenez briefly describes her findings and deducts “the lotteries have actually been paying out approximately 4 percent to the organisations while taking in practically $20 billion in 2002.” (New York Times, May 18, 2003, sec. 4, p. 1). If states raised income tax by a portion of a percent, they might create just as much earnings as state lotteries. That is how irrelevant they are. Along with being an ineffective cash raising scheme, the lotto is also a regressive kind of taxation. The tourist attraction of the lotto is to strike it rich immediately and never need to work once again.

The message is most evident to the poor, undereducated, and compulsive gamblers. As a result, these citizens participate in the lottery spending an average of three times as much of their income on lottery tickets than the wealthy would. This is, in effect, due to false and misleading advertising aimed specifically at this market. Furthermore, the only new jobs that are created unless, by chance a new casino goes in, are the vacancies for advertising executives and accounting clerks. The positions for clerks that actually sell the tickets do not need filling because they are previously filled at convenience and grocery stores.

In addition, state run lotteries are unwholesome and dangerous for the common good. They send out a message that opposes the ethics of hard work, sacrifice, and integrity—everything Americans believe in. The lottery is deceptive and encourages people to believe that they will win something for nothing. Still, government allows lotteries and actually promotes them, encouraging citizens to participate.

One of the greatest problems associated with the lottery is that it can lead to addiction. So although people are buying the tickets of their own free will and free will to participate is one of the pro’s of the lottery. Exactly how much free will really is there when all of the manipulation is being done by the ad executives targeting prime citizens, the government strong-arming the constituents into their lottery schemes, and the gambling addicts cannot really help themselves? Government has no business enticing people to gamble their hard earned money for an against the odds chance of winning a big cash prize. It is irresponsible, immoral and far from fair and honest.

Works Cited

Jimenez, Gloria. “Against the Odds, and Against the Common Good.” Pg. 112-114. Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing. Barnett & Bedau. New York. Bedford/St. Martin.2008. Print

Cite this essay

Against the Odds, and Against the Common Good Essay Review. (2016, Jun 08). Retrieved from https://studymoose.com/against-the-odds-and-against-the-common-good-essay-review-essay

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