Science Essay Examples

Science essay examples

By definition, science is the intellectual and practical activity encompassing the systematic study of the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world through observation and experiment. While technology is the usage of knowledge, tools, and crafts that affects the species ability to control and adapt to environmental changes. Many times, science and technology go hand in hand. However, the goal of science is the quest for knowledge for its own specific reason while the goal of technology is to create innovative products that assist in improving our lives.

Review of Related Literature
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Everything that we do today involves electricity, I can’t imagine a life without electricity. Imagine a life without lights at night, no cell phones, no TV, no cable and no internet. It’s like a catastrophe. But where do we really get this electricity? This energy came from the power plants where it is producing mostly by burning fossil fuels to rotate the turbine thus turning the generator and it produces electricity that what we are using in our everyday life.…...
LiteratureResearch
Personal and Academic Experience of American Students
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This literature review focuses on researches relevant to the development of theory on the personal and academic experiences of Ivatan students enrolled in higher education institutions in the mainland Luzon. According to Creswell (2009), qualitative methods provide a richness and depth about the way students experience the phenomenon. Strauss & Corbin (1998) mentioned that grounded theory is a qualitative method which encourages flexible interaction with participants in their natural settings. The central aim is hearing the participants’ voices and experiences,…...
LiteratureResearch
Essence and Importance of Time
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Time is the most misused resource known to man. “Time is free, but it’s priceless. You can’t own it, but you can use it. You can’t keep it, but you can spend it. And once it’s lost you can never get it back.” (Meha 14) It often takes the misuse of time to realize the true value of it. When asked “What is the biggest mistake we make in life?” the Buddha replied, “The biggest mistake is you think you…...
Case StudyTime
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Space Exploration and Earth
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One day the Earth will not be suitable for human life to live on. NASA will need to start looking for another planets like Mars that are suitable to live on so when that day comes we are ready. So therefore there are many reasons for space exploration. Astronauts will gain knowledge and become smarter, also NASA has the best trained astronauts on the field according to critics. Others may say that Mars is too dangerous to explore, but in…...
Space Exploration
Space Exploration Essay
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Should humans really make the effort to find a way to live in space or on other planets? Earth is our main possible long term habitat, but it is very delicate. Even if we avoid making it partly unlivable because of pollution, global warming, and etc. It's also in the middle of the firing line for passing asteroids. At one and time Earth will be hit by a huge rock. It could be soon, or it could be in a…...
Space Exploration
Nutrition & Fetal Brain Development Critique
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The fetal brain starts developing at just 2 weeks after gestation, which is before most women even know they are pregnant. According to Carolyn Robbins (2018), poor maternal nutrition can be damaging to the unborn child's brain development. If a woman is planning to get pregnant or think they might be she should talk to her doctor and make sure that she is eating a healthy diet. Robbins discusses brain development, malnutrition and the effects of alcohol and folic acid…...
Brain
Brain Development and Play
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Textbooks. Speeches. Blackboards. These were key elements used for education for many years. However, learning doesn’t have to be so rigid. Neuroscience has taught us of a learning method much more appropriate for children, known as play. The idea is that kids learn by engaging in actual activities. The reasoning behind this theory is that the act of play actually helps development of the brain. Children will gain much more by actively engaging in a project as apposed to just…...
BrainPlay
Application of Theory: Patient-Centered Nursing Framework
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The thesis and models are essential elements in the nursing field and created to delineate and perceive what nursing and could be. A thesis is a collection of ideas acquired from the model. It forms the basis of practice. Applying the argument into the areas of a Family Nurse Practitioner, organizing foundations that will help appraise care, foster interventions, and gauge the worth of care (Aura, 2015). Models are build-up of a thesis that assist in expanding nurses' qualities and…...
PsychologyTheory
The Betty Neuman Systems Model in Nursing Practice
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Introduction Nursing theories are brought about organically as nurses set forth to provide the highest quality patient centered care possible. As specific nurses over time have cared for their patients, they developed expertise and technique that is of such importance to the nursing profession that it is implemented as a Nursing Theory. The Neuman System Model (NSM) emphasizes its focus on stress and how it is perceived by a patient. Neuman’s model is a grand theory and embodies a holistic…...
PsychologyTheory
The Concept of Ethnographic Research
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According to the Dictionary of Social Sciences, ethnographic research is “The study of the culture and social organization of a particular group or community... Ethnography refers to both the data gathering of anthropology and the development of analysis of specific peoples, settings, or ways of life (“Research Methodologies for the Creative Arts & Humanities: Ethnographic Research”).” It focuses on the ways people interact with each other and aims to understand why it is that people do what they choose to…...
ResearchScience
Local Government Final Ethnography
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Introduction According to Gledhill (1994), the field of political anthropology, in seeking to relate the local to the global, must include a better understanding of the dynamics of political organization and power in Western societies. When we relate the local to the global, it is important to understand local power. Local government is the smallest and closest form of government to the individual. It “directly impact the daily lives of their residents” (Urban, 2017) as it is specifically catered to…...
ResearchScience
Respiratory Therapy Essay 
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Imagine a patient just resting in their bed, as you are about to end your shift for the night. You clock out and are about to just exit the door of the hospital until a nurse comes running up to you stating that the patients heart monitor is buzzing like crazy. You drop everything and run to the room. The patient is under cardiac arrest and you just have a few seconds to save this person’s life. You order a…...
Respiratory System
Acute Respiratory Failure
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Developing Critical Thinking through Understanding Pathophysiology Primary Problem (Medical Diagnosis) of patient: Acute Respiratory Failure (Type 1 Hypoxemia) Define and describe in your own words, the pathophysiology of the primary problem of your patient. Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is the impairment of the gas exchange function of the lung(s), where either oxygen is unable to diffuse from the alveoli and into the blood and tissues or carbon dioxide is unable to diffuse out from the blood and into the alveoli,…...
Respiratory System
An Overview of DNA Replication
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Introduction The process of DNA (Deoxyribonucleic acid) replication plays a very imperative role in providing genetic continuity from one generation to the succeeding one. Knowledge of the structure of the DNA began in 1869, with the discovery of nucleic acids. An accurate model of the DNA molecule was presented in 1952 by Rosalind Franklin, Francis Crick and James Watson. To reproduce, a cell must copy and transmit its genetic information (DNA), to all of its progeny. To do so, the…...
Dna
The Facts About HIV/AIDS Within the African American Community
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According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, "African Americans account for more than half of the 40,000 new HIV infections estimated to occur in the United States per year. Moreover, AIDS is the number one killer among Blacks between the ages of 25 and 44." This frightens me because my Uncle is HIV positive. Nevertheless, I believe that the reason why political figures, such as President Bush are not taking the HIV/AIDS epidemic seriously is because the disease is not prominent…...
AidsHivHiv Virus
Use of Drunk Stories by Authors
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Often times in literature, authors will illustrate the use and effects of alcohol to reflect the experiences that they had encountered within their own lives. Alcohol usually creates a distortion of reality and in some cases self-destructive behavior. Although alcohol can be problematic, it is also used in literature for entertainment purposes and makes things happen. In “The Swimmer“ by John Cheever and “The Drunkard” by Frank O’Connor, alcohol influences the characters and provokes problems within their lives involving relationships…...
Sense
The rise and fall of humor: Psychological Distance Modulates Humorous
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McGraw, Williams, and Warren (2013) designed a study to help find how humor changes over time after a tragedy. In the study the tragedy they used to test the theory was Hurricane Sandy. The study involved more than one thousand participants, recruited online, from Amazon Mechanical Turk network. In the article the authors used the benign violation theory to help them see if psychological distance helps with the transformation from tragedy to comedy. The theory says that humor rises when…...
Sense
Technology and Engineering Making Easier Life
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“Engineering or technology is all about using the power of science to make life better for people, to reduce cost, to improve comfort, to improve productivity.” Since from my childhood I am completely amazed to know how the mankind is evolved technologically from stone weapons to a modern day supercomputer. Due to tremendous development in the industrialization and the mechanical sector I drew my attention towards mechanical engineering. I was always eager to know about the design, construction and application…...
EngineeringTechnology
Preparation and properties of medical polymer tissue engineering scaffolds
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Polyurethane (PU) is a kind of high polymer with unique properties and wide use, especially as a medical material. The purpose of this paper is to design and synthesize poly (polyurethane) scaffold suitable for bone tissue engineering. The polyurethane tissue engineering scaffolds with good biocompatibility, biodegradability, mechanical properties and biological activity are the key points of this study by optimizing the reaction conditions and adjusting the ratio of raw materials to make good biocompatibility, biodegradability, mechanical properties and biological activity.…...
EngineeringTechnology
A Study on the Statuary Collection in the Baths of Zeuxippus
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Introduction The Baths of Zeuxippus could be dated back to 100 AD when Constantinople was still under construction as a normal city and had not yet became the centre of the whole Roman Empire'. According the primary records? the name of the Baths of Zeuxippus came from an ancient architecture, The Temple of Jupiter, a temple that occupied the spot before the baths were built over. However most of the renovations occurred after the year of 330, when Constantine the…...
Anthropology
An Argument in Favor of the Legalization of Physician-Assisted Suicide/Euthanasia Due to the Quality of Life, Economical, and Societal Implications
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For years, there has been much controversy regarding physician-assisted suicide/euthanasia and the patient's right to die. Thus far there has not been a concrete decision in all states as to whether or not a doctor can provide the means or administer a lethal dose of painkillers to a dying patient. This practice is looked down upon by some as a form of murder and opposite the duty expected of a physician. However, this practice also extolls the very basic virtue…...
Assisted SuicideEuthanasiaMedicine
A Discussion on the Reasons for the Elimination of Sugar from Our Daily Diets
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Sugar has become a very important part of our routine diet. It is so entwined with our diets that one cannot easily eliminate sugar directly from their food. This increased intake of sugar has become reason of various diseases and health risks like diabetes, obesity, overloading the liver and many more. This paper will discuss some solid reasons why it is necessary to eliminate sugar from our daily diets to prevent health risks. It will also give a brief idea…...
FoodHealthNutritionSugar
The Controversy of the Government’s Money Spending in the United States and the NASA’s Poor Handling
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One of the most prominent controversies of government spending in recent years has been the funding of space exploration. Space exploration requires substantial costs and commitments, which are certainly enough to put a country in serious debt if budgets are handled poorly. With other domestic issues becoming more prominent and requiring more funding, NASA has become something of an afterthought. At first glance, space exploration funding seems like a waste of time and money that would be better off invested…...
EconomySpace Exploration
An Overview of the Signs and Symptoms Neurocognitive Disorders
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Abstract Neurocognitive disorders is an acquired cognitive decline in one or more cognitive domains. The decline of the cognitive aspect must not just be a sense of loss of the cognitive abilities but must be observed by others through cognitive assessment. These disorders have adverse effects in the human body with some of its effects ranging from memory, attention, perception language and social cognition. Thus, an individual is having neurocognitive disorder have a significant influence on their general independence and…...
Medicine
The Cultural and Social Influences of Our Native Language
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This paper tries to answer the question of whether our native language influences the ways we think, to what extent and in which circumstances. It explores different findings of linguistic relativity and how they assert the notion of this hypothesis. Topics such as words for color and their influence on perception, grammatical gender, grammatical tense of words, spatial and time conceptualizations, and socio-cultural aspects are discussed all in relation to their influence on the speaker's thought process. Evidence contradicting this…...
LinguisticsSociology
Research Proposal: Digital Resource Planning for Newly Established Enterprise
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Introduction Information technology is playing a key role today in enhancing value of modern enterprises that operate over the virtual platform. Increasing scope and popularity of internet and Internet of Things (IoT) has opened new gateways to tremendous business opportunities globally. The advent of digital revolution has brought radical transformations in the ways of doing business consequently compelling every organization to adopt and implement state of the art technological resources and IT infrastructure due to the worldwide popularity and extensive…...
Research
Research Proposal: Child Abuse and Neglect-Evaluating Existing Institutional Organizations
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Unfortunately, in this day and adolescent abuse is excessively normal. adolescent abuse happens to pay little mind to ethnicities, societies, condition, and instructive levels. We as a whole have found out adolescent victims' survivors of maltreatment around the nation and our world. They are several types, for example, sexual, physical, and passionate. Even though we hear much about the rated pace of adolescent abuse, we catch wind of the accessibility of treatment strategies, and assets to adolescent maltreatment. With the…...
Child AbuseResearch
Should We Be Skeptical of Science
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The scientific method is a common procedure used by scientists to prove their theories along with several new discoveries. They create hypotheses, conduct experiments, and gather data to discover new findings. These findings are then peer-reviewed by many other scientists so it can be stated as a fact rather than a theory. Scientists use empirical evidence which is known as scientifically based research from fields such as psychology and sociology from educational settings. They gather this empirical data to prove…...
Science
Science Behind Slime
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Slime comes in forms of ways counting on however you create it. It will come in different colors and sizes with different ingredients. “Slime is a distinctive play material composed of cross-linked polymers classified as a liquid. It is usually created by combining polyvinyl alcohol ( PVA) solutions with borate ions on an oversized combining container.” (Advameg,Inc, n.d)It usually has an unpleasant odor, an inexperienced color, and is cold and slimy to the touch. There is a chemical reaction that…...
Science
Xinyao Song “Singapore Pie”
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I was born in the eighties. I have always been surrounded by music as I grew up in a musical family. My dad was in a band and my mom was a music teacher. On top of the previously mentioned influences, as a Chinese Singaporean, I was consistently being exposed to xinyao. This reflective essay will seek to focus on how transnational popular cultural flows influenced the music culture of Singapore and a semiotic analysis on a piece of xinyao…...
Semiotics
First World War and Semiotics
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The forces that led to the rise of modernism in the late 19th and early 20th century were diverse and complex. New social norms, a conception of history that was increasingly Hegelian, the development of empiricism and the concomitant loss of conviction in the Renaissance tradition, industrialization and the rise of mechanization—all of these contributed to its growth and eventual flowering. Yet there can be no question that modernism, insofar as it can be characterized as a unified phenomenon, reached…...
Semiotics
The Impact of the Withdrawal of the United States Troops in Iraq on the Empowerment of Iran
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Justification for the chosen topic: Withdrawal of United States troops during the 2011 sparked diversity of International debates and one of the most common is the belief that it's a triumph for Iran. The chosen research question is short and direct, with rich academia resource access and is doable regards to amount of time I could assign to this project. There isn't any scholar effort completed in my chosen research area – that means it doesn't duplicate other scholars and…...
GeographyPolitics
An Analysis of the Structure of Scientific Revolutions
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There can be little doubt that, with the publishing of The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn transformed the nature of the debate on the sociology of science. For many, Kuhn not only managed to implicate a new focus for the sociology of science, but also to strengthen the external legitimacy of sociology's place in the understanding of science. In contradistinction to the beliefs of the empiricist tradition in the philosophy of science: of timeless logical rules assessing and validating claims,…...
The Scientific Revolution
A Critical Analysis of Eric Wolf’s Theory on the Realms of Anthropology
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"My primary interest is to explain something out there that impinges me, and I would sell my soul to the devil if I thought it would help." Eric Wolf's interest into the realm of anthropology emerged upon recognition of the theorist- imposed boundaries, encompassing both theories and subjects, which current and past anthropological scholars had constructed. These boundaries, Wolf believed, were a result of theorist tending to societies and cultures as fixed entitiesstatic, bounded and autonomous, rather then describing and…...
Anthropology
The Concept of Callout Culture
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Most people probably know most the vocabulary involved in callout culture, as it is a phenomenon we all experience, but it is helpful to have them put into words. Political correctness, which is the basis for callout culture, is a “term used to refer to language that seems intended to give the least amount of offense, especially when describing groups identified by... race, gender, culture, or sexual orientation” (Roper np). Callout culture is when people take political correctness into their…...
DiffusionReligion
Impact of the Rise Of Greece on Society
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The rise of Greece brought with it revolutionary changes to society and innovations that would forever alter how civilizations conducted themselves. With its sudden growth brought sudden changes that fundamentally changed how people viewed the world around them and how people chose to spend their time. Its philosophical knowledge would last far longer than it would, influencing great empires such as Rome, and its ancient architectural and artistic breakthroughs would influence many future projects, and continues to even to this…...
DiffusionReligion
Culture of the Upper Paleolithic
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To understand the culture of the Upper Paleolithic period we must first understand what exactly is culture and what exactly is the Paleolithic period. Culture by definition is “a shared way of life that includes material products, values, beliefs, and norms that are transmitted within a particular society from generation to generation” (Scupin, 2016) it is also one hundred percent learned. The Upper Paleolithic is the “most recent period of the Paleolithic, also referred to the Late Sone Age, defined…...
DiffusionReligion
Interchange between Religion and Culture
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“Religions are like species, they either evolve or they go extinct” - Unknown It is hardly rocket science that culture and religion are two things that go hand in hand. Your beliefs and values are shaped by which culture, segment of society, or family that you have been exposed to or raised in. In a sense, because of where you were born or what your family believes you really have no choice in what ideals are placed in your head…...
DiffusionReligion
Disabling of Hypermasculinity in Black Men
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As a social construct, masculinity is a complex force that often drives behaviors and attitudes for men. While these behaviors are often shaped by societal expectations, values, and ideals of manhood; its implications can be especially disabling or even deadly when considering the Black male. Black men have long faced societal isolation, inequality, and disrespect compared to their white counterparts. As black men navigate their way through society they are constantly reminded through implicit and subtle acts of racism, media…...
Тhе Space
Afrofuturism and Black Womanhood 
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Pages • 7
Displays of resilience have long been part of African history within the diaspora. A constant need to defend Black bodies from enslavement, Jim Crow, sexual violence, and police brutality have allowed Black people to create spaces that accommodate them and fight for their inclusion within history. The ways in which activism engaged with these concepts are prominent within the arts and more specifically music and literature. These two mediums have been used as radical declarations of pro Blackness and were…...
Тhе Space
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Importance of Biotechnology

Science never changes and is nothing but a process of exploring new knowledge. On the other hand, technology is rapidly changing and putting scientific knowledge into practice. Put science and technology together and you end up with biotechnology. Biotechnology has provided us with innovative technologies that assist in reducing our environmental footprint, feeding the hungry, combating devastating diseases, using less and much cleaner energy, along with more efficient industrial manufacturing procedures (“What is Biotechnology?”). In more or less words, biotechnology is the leading component in healing, fueling, and feeding the world. Though there are a never-ending amount of advancements in biotechnology, I’m choosing to focus on Genetically Modified Organisms, commonly referred to as GMO’s.

Genetically Modified Organisms

A genetically modified organism is a living organism whose genetic material has been artificially manipulated through genetic engineering which in return produces combinations of animal, plant, virus, and bacteria genes that do not occur naturally (“GMO Facts”). These genes can be extracted from any living being, plant, or structure and forced into the structure of any other living organism. There are many diverse purposes of GMO’s including; insect resistance, drought resistance, herbicide tolerance, disease resistance, and an enhanced nutritional profile. Along with optimizing agricultural performance, animals can also be genetically modified to reduce their susceptibility to diseases and increase yields. Although many individuals embrace the idea of genetic engineering, others have been hesitant because of the ongoing debate of their advantages and disadvantages. Genetically modified crops have the ability to conserve water, soil, energy, resources, and land. Along with the possibility of increased shelf life, better health benefits, less chance of crop extinction, the possible elimination of food allergies, and more (Lombardo, 2017). However, with the advantages always come the disadvantages. For instance, it’s thought that the use of genetic engineering could create antibiotic resistance, create super bugs and super weeds, encourage the use of additional herbicides, affect animal proteins, contaminate other crop fields and increase the possibility of food intolerance (Lombardo, 2017).

Famous Scientific Discoveries

There were many scientific discoveries before genetically modified organisms could even be thought of. However, there are two discoveries that are considered to be the breakthrough that would unite genetics and biotechnology. The first of which was in 1953 with the discovery of the DNA structure by JD Watson and FHC Crick (Colwell, 2018). For the first time ever, the mystery that surrounded DNA as genetic material was cleared. The second major scientific discovery came in 1973 when Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer successfully performed the first recombinant DNA experiment with bacterial genes (Colwell, 2018).

These discoveries represented a landmark for a long sequence of developments in molecular genetics and biochemistry. Improved by new methods, within years genetic engineering became the foundation in an explosion of biotechnology.

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