Essays on To Kill A Mockingbird

To Kill A Mockingbird
Original title To Kill A Mockingbird
Author Harper Lee
Genre Southern Gothic , Bildungsroman
Language English
Characters Scout Finch, Atticus Finch, Jem Finch, Dill Harris, Miss Maudie Atkinson, Calpurnia, Arthur Boo" Radley, Tom Robinson, Bob Ewell, Mayella Ewell" ...
Published July 11, 1960
ISBN 978-0-449-00302-8
Book Summary
Essay Examples

Table of Contents

About To Kill A Mockingbird Book

To Kill A Mockingbird is a book created by American author Harper Lee that was first published in 1960. It has become enormously successful, being translated into more than 40 languages and selling more than 40 million albums.

Besides that, it is one of the most often assigned books in American high schools. It was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1961. The work was appreciated for its sensitive representation of a child’s awakening to racism and discrimination in the American South.

Book Summary

To Kill A Mockingbird is situated in Maycomb, Alabama, during the height of the Great Depression. The main character, Jean Louise (“Scout”) Finch, grows up from the age of 6 to 9 during the book.

Atticus Finch, their widowed father, raises her and her brother Jeremy Atticus (“Jem”). He is a well-known attorney who teaches his children the values of empathy and justice. He informs them that it is “a shame To Kill A Mockingbird,” pointing to the detail that the birds are peaceful and innocent creatures.

One of the town’s black citizens (Tom Robinson) is wrongly accused of rape by Mayella Ewell, a white lady. Atticus offers to protect him. His client is about to be lynched, and still, he refuses to get away from the crowd.

Scout unintentionally defuses the situation. Although Atticus claims that Mayella’s father, Bob Ewell, abused her, Tom is convicted and dies while attempting to escape the authorities.

“The senseless slaughter of songbirds” is how a character describes his own death, echoing Atticus’s remark about the mockingbird. On the other hand, the children play out their tiny play of prejudice and superstition as they grow intrigued by Arthur “Boo” Radley, a reclusive neighbor who is a local legend.

Trespassing on Radley’s land is irresistible to them since they have their thoughts about him and cannot resist. As long as their elders continue to degrade them, their theories will have a place in the world.

On the other hand, Atticus warns them and urges them to adopt a more sympathetic attitude. When Bob Ewell confronts Jem and Scout, Boo makes his presence known indirectly via a series of charitable gestures, eventually causing him to save the day.

Although Boo is responsible for the murder of Ewell, Sheriff Heck Tate prefers to claim that Ewell died as a result of a self-inflicted knife wound, thereby protecting the timid Boo from unwelcome attention. Towards the book’s conclusion, Scout looks out her window at her neighborhood from the Radley home and wonders what Boo thinks of it all.

To Kill A Mockingbird   Characters

To Kill A Mockingbird’s main cast includes the following individuals:

Scout (Jean Louise Finch): The story’s narrator. Scout is six to nine years old when the story takes place, but she relates it as an adult.

Atticus Finch: Atticus, a widower, raises his two children, Jem and Scout, as a single father.

Jem (Jeremy Atticus Finch): Scout’s elder brother, who varies in age from 10 to 13 during the course of the novel. He is Scout’s defender and one of her closest pals.

Arthur “Boo” Radley: Evil may threaten both innocence and virtue in the form of Boo, a brilliant boy who has been mentally harmed by his abusive father. There are several “mockingbird” characters in the story, and this one is one of them.

Bob Ewell: A member of Maycomb’s most impoverished family who is often intoxicated and jobless. Because of his intentionally false claim that Tom Robinson had sexually assaulted his daughter, Tom is killed. 

Tom Robinson: The black field worker accused of rape. Tom is one of the novel’s “mockingbirds,” a symbol of purity that is shattered by evil.

To Kill A Mockingbird   Quotes

Life quotations are sprinkled throughout the book, which is a tribute to its emotional impact. A few of the book’s most memorable lines are highlighted below.

  •     Atticus Finch: “He turned out the light and went into Jem’s room. He would be there all night, and he would be there when Jem woke up in the morning.”
  •     Jem Finch: “Atticus ain’t ever whipped me since I can remember. I want to keep it that way.”
  •     Atticus Finch: “There are some men in this world who are born to do our unpleasant jobs for us. Your father’s one of them.”
  •     Atticus Finch: “Why reasonable people go stark raving mad when anything involving a Negro comes up, is something I don’t pretend to understand.”
  •     Atticus Finch: “Boo Radley. You were so busy looking at the fire you didn’t know it when he put the blanket around you.”

Essay Structure On To Kill A Mockingbird 

To Kill A Mockingbird or any other literature, most students begin by writing their thesis first when answering a To Kill A Mockingbird essay topics. However, we strongly advise beginning with your analysis! A basic structure for creating a text response essay follows this process.

Introduction

Your essay title should be re-stated what the issue is asking and how you intend to respond to that To Kill A Mockingbird essay questions. On occasion, you may be requested to provide a reason for your opinion. What is your opinion on the subject?

Body

Your answer should comprise at least four or five well-structured paragraphs, each of which focuses on one or two major topics. It should include extensive quotations and a To Kill A Mockingbird essay prompt from the book.

Conclusion

After you’ve addressed the most important issues and arguments in the main body paragraphs, it’s time to summarize your research. This part doesn’t provide any new concepts. It synthesizes your arguments and thoughts to express your perspective on the issue. Your To Kill A Mockingbird essays will be easier to write if you follow this structure: Topic Sentence (T.), Example (E), Explanation (E), Link (L).

Tips To Consider While Writing An Essay About To Kill A Mockingbird 

“To Kill A Mockingbird,” Harper Lee’s iconic work of Southern Gothic literature, is set in an Alabama town in the early twentieth century. You must thoroughly read, analyze, think, and organize your To Kill A Mockingbird essay examples before writing a decent one. Most students should be able to compose an essay and get a good score if they follow these instructions.

Read The Book Thoroughly

As you read the book, pay great attention to the tiniest of details. Make a note of everything that you believe is significant. Analyze Harper Lee’s narrative for any underlying concepts she may be trying to get over.

One example of the To Kill A Mockingbird theme essays is the racism that surrounded the trial of Tom Robinson. In Maycomb, the inhabitants’ conduct and small-town Southern life are shown in a very realistic and authentic way.

Find A Compelling Topic

You may come up with great To Kill A Mockingbird essay topics. To discover which ideas made it into the final copy of your essay, you’ll have to complete writing it. As a consequence, you won’t risk mistakenly changing the title.

Then double-check. The strongest basis for your paper’s title is likely to come from your thesis and main ideas. A few ideas come to mind. It doesn’t matter whether the titles are short or long; assessing what works best for your article is the first step.

 Create The Outline

Before you begin writing your essay, sketch out an outline. Organize the material into sections that cover the topics you believe are the most significant. Atticus and Boo Radley have been mentioned as well as the rest of the primary characters. Try to connect them and explain how they fit into the story.

Write The Thesis Statement

As far as Atticus Finch is concerned, Aunt Alexandra is his sibling when it comes to familial ties. The relationships between Atticus, Jem, and Scout that Finch establishes in this essay will be explained using her as a point of reference.

Include A Lesson Or Moral

The ideas of “To Kill A Mockingbird,” as addressed in this article, provide vital lessons to society. It investigates the impact of morality, good vs. evil, racism, and literacy on society. It serves as a reminder that people are ready to make snap judgments about others based just on their looks.

According to the book, Hatred and ignorance, and other evils beset the human race. It also focuses on racism, which is still prevalent in the U.S. and other parts of the globe today. This illustrates that kids can acquire the essentials of education at home if they have someone to help them through the process of doing so.

Conclusion: Proofread Your Work

Make a thorough review of your rough draft and identify any mistakes or places for improvement. Read the To Kill A Mockingbird essay aloud to check for grammar and sentence structure mistakes. Complete the final draft of your paper and make any necessary revisions.

Suppose you find difficulty in writing an essay about To Kill A Mockingbird. Here is the place to go when it comes to creating an essay on To Kill A Mockingbird. We’ll be able to accomplish it for you in a far more efficient and timely manner.

FAQs

      i.        Where To Kill A Mockingbird takes place?

During the Great Depression (1929–39), To Kill A Mockingbird takes place in Maycomb, Alabama, which is a fictitious town. Jean Louise “Scout” Finch, a six to nine-year-old girl, is the book’s protagonist.

    ii.        Who Is Mrs. Dubose In To Kill A Mockingbird?

We’re introduced to Mrs. Henry Lafayette Dubose, the Finches’ old, cantankerous neighbor who’s often on her porch and yelling abuse at youngsters. To go to town, Jem and Scout must pass by her home many times a day, and they hate having to do so.

   iii.        Who Is Scout In To Kill A Mockingbird?

The storyteller of To Kill A Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman is Jean Louise “Scout” Finch, who is now an adult. She reflects on a moment when she didn’t comprehend anything but now appreciates it. She gets into difficulty with Miss Caroline, her instructor, since she is supposed to acquire reading and writing on her own terms.

   iv.        How Old Is Jem In To Kill A Mockingbird?

During the course of To Kill A Mockingbird, Jem grows from 10 to 13 years old, which is a significant age in any child’s life.

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FAQ about To Kill A Mockingbird

“The Place or Type Of Surroundings Where Something is Positioned or Where an Event Takes Place.”
...Connection: Later in the story, the plot develops using the setting. More events are being introduced to the audience and the story continues. As the novel progresses, people like Atticus tries to change the culture as well as Scout’s opinions by m...
How the Moral Lessons of to Kill a Mockingbird Endure Today?
...In this way, the novel ends with a faint reminder of some of its fundamental themes that have run throughout it, such as accusation, threat and innocence. By illustrating the wise moral outlook of Atticus, the reminder puts these themes to rest. If o...