The strengths and weaknesses of the demographic transition Essay

Custom Student Mr. Teacher ENG 1001-04 23 May 2016

The strengths and weaknesses of the demographic transition

The demographic transition model describes how the population of a country changes over time. It gives changes in birth rates and death rates, and shows that countries pass through five different stages of population change (Stage one – High fluctuation, Stage two – Early expanding, Stage three – Late expanding, Stage four – Low fluctuating and Stage five – Decline) The demographic transition model has both strengths and weaknesses for example some strengths would include that the demographic transition model is a universal concept, therefore being able to be applied to every country in the world, Another strength would be that the model shows a change over time and can be seen as a predictor, with the expectation that every country will progress through the stages of the model for countries in Europe and the USA the model works well and was good to bode where countries are going in regards to development. It also shows change over time and can also shows change over time and can be used as a head start point for discussion about how to help LEDCs to develop.

However the Demographic Transition model also has its weaknesses some weakness would include the fact that the demographic transition model does not include the role of the government, some governments may put antenatal and prenatal operations in place to encourage the decrease or to increase the birth rate within these countries, therefore countries like China that are antenatal and have the one child policy put in place and countries like the UK which are prenatal and offer child benefits may show fluctuation of the birth rate in stages it should be decreasing or increasing in. Further more In stage four, the UK experienced a post-war baby boom where the birth rate should be steadily decreasing – this shows that the demographic transition model does not include the impacts of wars, natural hazards or migration either. In addition another weakness would be that it is Eurocentric based and therefore is assuming that all other countries in the world will follow the European sequence of economic changes therefore making it harder to apply to poorer countries as they are less likely to follow the stages of those in a more developed country.

Furthermore the timescale of the model assumes that a country will have equal time in each stage however the timescale is now generally being squashed as newly industrialised countries continue to industrialize especially in several South-East Asian countries such as Hong Kong and Malaysia, is being squashed as they develop at a much faster rate than earlier industrialised countries. The UK stayed in stage 2 for over 100 years as social, economic and technological changes were introduced slowly and death rate fell slowly. In many LEDCs, death rate has fallen more rapidly because changes (i.e. the introduction of western medicine) have taken place much more quickly. The birth rate has stayed high and so the population has increased rapidly. The demographic transition model has both strengths and weaknesses, it can be applied to any country in the world as it is a universal concept however being a Eurocentric based model it is less likely or more hard to be applied to those countries outside of Europe.

The model can help to suggest what will happen to a country in terms of population and in terms of development however it cannot suggest how long a country will take to pass through each stage as each country is an individual. The demographic transition model describes how the population of a country changes over time. It gives changes in birth rates and death rates, and shows that countries pass through five different stages of population change (Stage one – High fluctuation, Stage two – Early expanding, Stage three – Late expanding, Stage four – Low fluctuating and Stage five – Decline) The demographic transition model has both strengths and weaknesses for example some strengths would include that the demographic transition model is a universal concept, therefore being able to be applied to every country in the world, Another strength would be that the model shows a change over time and can be seen as a predictor, with the expectation that every country will progress through the stages of the model for countries in Europe and the USA the model works well and was good to bode where countries are going in regards to development.

It also shows change over time and can also shows change over time and can be used as a head start point for discussion about how to help LEDCs to develop. However the Demographic Transition model also has its weaknesses some weakness would include the fact that the demographic transition model does not include the role of the government, some governments may put antenatal and prenatal operations in place to encourage the decrease or to increase the birth rate within these countries, therefore countries like China that are antenatal and have the one child policy put in place and countries like the UK which are prenatal and offer child benefits may show fluctuation of the birth rate in stages it should be decreasing or increasing in. Further more In stage four, the UK experienced a post-war baby boom where the birth rate should be steadily decreasing – this shows that the demographic transition model does not include the impacts of wars, natural hazards or migration either. In addition another weakness would be that it is Eurocentric based and therefore is assuming that all other countries in the world will follow the European sequence of economic changes therefore making it harder to apply to poorer countries as they are less likely to follow the stages of those in a more developed country.

Furthermore the timescale of the model assumes that a country will have equal time in each stage however the timescale is now generally being squashed as newly industrialised countries continue to industrialize especially in several South-East Asian countries such as Hong Kong and Malaysia, is being squashed as they develop at a much faster rate than earlier industrialised countries. The UK stayed in stage 2 for over 100 years as social, economic and technological changes were introduced slowly and death rate fell slowly. In many LEDCs, death rate has fallen more rapidly because changes (i.e. the introduction of western medicine) have taken place much more quickly. The birth rate has stayed high and so the population has increased rapidly. The demographic transition model has both strengths and weaknesses, it can be applied to any country in the world as it is a universal concept however being a Eurocentric based model it is less likely or more hard to be applied to those countries outside of Europe.

The model can help to suggest what will happen to a country in terms of population and in terms of development however it cannot suggest how long a country will take to pass through each stage as each country is an individual. The demographic transition model describes how the population of a country changes over time. It gives changes in birth rates and death rates, and shows that countries pass through five different stages of population change (Stage one – High fluctuation, Stage two – Early expanding, Stage three – Late expanding, Stage four – Low fluctuating and Stage five – Decline) The demographic transition model has both strengths and weaknesses for example some strengths would include that the demographic transition model is a universal concept, therefore being able to be applied to every country in the world, Another strength would be that the model shows a change over time and can be seen as a predictor, with the expectation that every country will progress through the stages of the model for countries in Europe and the USA the model works well and was good to bode where countries are going in regards to development. It also shows change over time and can also shows change over time and can be used as a head start point for discussion about how to help LEDCs to develop.

However the Demographic Transition model also has its weaknesses some weakness would include the fact that the demographic transition model does not include the role of the government, some governments may put antenatal and prenatal operations in place to encourage the decrease or to increase the birth rate within these countries, therefore countries like China that are antenatal and have the one child policy put in place and countries like the UK which are prenatal and offer child benefits may show fluctuation of the birth rate in stages it should be decreasing or increasing in. Further more In stage four, the UK experienced a post-war baby boom where the birth rate should be steadily decreasing – this shows that the demographic transition model does not include the impacts of wars, natural hazards or migration either. In addition another weakness would be that it is Eurocentric based and therefore is assuming that all other countries in the world will follow the European sequence of economic changes therefore making it harder to apply to poorer countries as they are less likely to follow the stages of those in a more developed country.

Furthermore the timescale of the model assumes that a country will have equal time in each stage however the timescale is now generally being squashed as newly industrialised countries continue to industrialize especially in several South-East Asian countries such as Hong Kong and Malaysia, is being squashed as they develop at a much faster rate than earlier industrialised countries. The UK stayed in stage 2 for over 100 years as social, economic and technological changes were introduced slowly and death rate fell slowly. In many LEDCs, death rate has fallen more rapidly because changes (i.e. the introduction of western medicine) have taken place much more quickly. The birth rate has stayed high and so the population has increased rapidly. The demographic transition model has both strengths and weaknesses, it can be applied to any country in the world as it is a universal concept however being a Eurocentric based model it is less likely or more hard to be applied to those countries outside of Europe. The model can help to suggest what will happen to a country in terms of population and in terms of development however it cannot suggest how long a country will take to pass through each stage as each country is an individual.

The demographic transition model describes how the population of a country changes over time. It gives changes in birth rates and death rates, and shows that countries pass through five different stages of population change (Stage one – High fluctuation, Stage two – Early expanding, Stage three – Late expanding, Stage four – Low fluctuating and Stage five – Decline) The demographic transition model has both strengths and weaknesses for example some strengths would include that the demographic transition model is a universal concept, therefore being able to be applied to every country in the world, Another strength would be that the model shows a change over time and can be seen as a predictor, with the expectation that every country will progress through the stages of the model for countries in Europe and the USA the model works well and was good to bode where countries are going in regards to development. It also shows change over time and can also shows change over time and can be used as a head start point for discussion about how to help LEDCs to develop.

However the Demographic Transition model also has its weaknesses some weakness would include the fact that the demographic transition model does not include the role of the government, some governments may put antenatal and prenatal operations in place to encourage the decrease or to increase the birth rate within these countries, therefore countries like China that are antenatal and have the one child policy put in place and countries like the UK which are prenatal and offer child benefits may show fluctuation of the birth rate in stages it should be decreasing or increasing in. Further more In stage four, the UK experienced a post-war baby boom where the birth rate should be steadily decreasing – this shows that the demographic transition model does not include the impacts of wars, natural hazards or migration either. In addition another weakness would be that it is Eurocentric based and therefore is assuming that all other countries in the world will follow the European sequence of economic changes therefore making it harder to apply to poorer countries as they are less likely to follow the stages of those in a more developed country.

Furthermore the timescale of the model assumes that a country will have equal time in each stage however the timescale is now generally being squashed as newly industrialised countries continue to industrialize especially in several South-East Asian countries such as Hong Kong and Malaysia, is being squashed as they develop at a much faster rate than earlier industrialised countries. The UK stayed in stage 2 for over 100 years as social, economic and technological changes were introduced slowly and death rate fell slowly. In many LEDCs, death rate has fallen more rapidly because changes (i.e. the introduction of western medicine) have taken place much more quickly.

The birth rate has stayed high and so the population has increased rapidly. The demographic transition model has both strengths and weaknesses, it can be applied to any country in the world as it is a universal concept however being a Eurocentric based model it is less likely or more hard to be applied to those countries outside of Europe. The model can help to suggest what will happen to a country in terms of population and in terms of development however it cannot suggest how long a country will take to pass through each stage as each country is an individual.

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