Essays on Tuesdays With Morrie

Tuesdays with Morrie is a memoir written by Mitch Albom. Mitch recounts the time he spent with Morrie Schwartz, a sociology professor that taught at Brandeis University, that was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie Review
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Reading Tuesdays with Morrie was truly an eye opening experience. In my biased opinion, I sincerely believe that this is a book that everyone should read. This book teaches you about how to be human, how to really enjoy and actually live life. Tuesdays with Morrie is one of the most relatable books I’ve read in awhile. Many of the things Morrie said really resonated with me. From the very first paragraph I was sucked in. Morrie was truly a…...
Book ReviewTuesday With MorrieTuesdays With Morrie
Mitch Albom’s Book Tuesdays with Morrie
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Tuesdays with Morrie is the memoir of Morrie Schwartz, written and narrated by Mitch Albom. Mitch is a graduate from Brandeis University and during his time there he was drawn to sociology professor, Morrie Schwartz. He took as many of his classes as he could and promised to keep in touch after graduation but life got in the way and the years passed without doing so. Sixteen years later he finds himself miserable and overworked in his profession, procrastinating marriage…...
Tuesdays With Morrie
Mitch Albom’s Tuesdays with Morrie Book Review
Words • 2568
Pages • 10
Tuesdays with Morrie is the memoir of Morrie Schwartz, written and narrated by Mitch Albom. Mitch is a graduate from Brandeis University and during his time there he was drawn to sociology professor, Morrie Schwartz. He took as many of his classes as he could and promised to keep in touch after graduation but life got in the way and the years passed without doing so. Sixteen years later he finds himself miserable and overworked in his profession, procrastinating marriage…...
Tuesdays With Morrie
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Aphorisms in Tuesdays with Morrie
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Pages • 4
“Accept what you are able to do and what you are not able to do.” (Albom 18) is the first and one of the most major aphorisms in Tuesdays with Morrie. I believe Morrie is speaking about recognizing your strengths, and not focusing so much on your weaknesses. He means, as he said, to “accept” your limitations. We are all affected by this aphorism everyday. We have limitations, and a lot of times we get so focused on our weaknesses…...
Tuesdays With Morrie
Death and Life – Tuesdays with Morrie
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Nagel wrote: "everybody dies, however not everyone concurs about what death is." In this chapter, Death, Nagel describes some of the beliefs individuals have about death. One of his points was survival after death. Nagel stated that if dualism is true we can comprehend how life after death may be possible. Each person would include a soul and a body, and the soul would have to be able to leave the body and function on its own. If dualism is…...
DeathLifeTuesdays With Morrie
Tuesdays With Morrie: Life’s Greatest Lesson
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The symbolic interactionism is an excellent sociological perspective that allows us to focus on micro activities and to analyze our society which is the product of everyday’s life. Tuesdays with Morrie is more than a simple book, more than a romance one; it is a great book that teaches us many of life’s greatest lessons. An analysis of this book using the SI perspective and concepts such as meaning making, status, impression management, looking-glass self, role taking, role making, and…...
Social PsychologyTuesdays With Morrie
Gaining Wisdom Through Suffering
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Wisdom is a difficult thing to define and understand. It’s easily recognized when people have experienced it. Wisdom is a tricky thing to obtain. Wisdom is the quality of having experience, knowledge, and good judgment. King Lear was foolish in the beginning of the play, but in the end he gained wisdom from his mistakes. Morrie from Tuesdays with Morrie was wise in the beginning of the book and became wiser in the end. Through suffering King Lear and Morrie…...
SufferingTuesdays With Morrie
“Tuesdays With Morrie” by Mitch Albom: Critical Thinking
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1. Yes, my opinion about Mitch did change as the book went on. As a young man in college, Mitch found a friend away from home. This friend happened to be Morrie, his professor. However, after Mitch graduated he was confronted by a world full of a "false" culture, foreign to a healthy one you can personally create. Mitch's dreams of becoming a musician quickly drifted away, and became hidden behind the pursuit of money and a powerful career. As…...
Critical ThinkingPhilosophyTuesdays With Morrie
Theme of Best Friend in Tuesdays with Morrie
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Morrie once said, “dying is only one thing to be sad over... living unhappily is something else.” Morrie Schwartz was a remarkable person, a wonderful husband, a loving father and an amazing professor. His loving personality has touched the lives of many people around him, including his students, family and friends. During our lessons in the weeks before his passing, he managed to change my whole life and my outlook of the world. I knew Morrie was different, the I…...
FriendTuesdays With Morrie
Movie and Book Comparison
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Pages • 2
Tuesdays With Morrie is both a book and a movie. They are alike and different in so many different ways. The movie is never going to have as much detail as the book did, but they did a good job making the movie as close as possible to the book. The book covered a lot more aspects of the story than the movie did, and the book focused on the bigger more important parts. There were a lot of main…...
Comparing a book to a movieComparisonMovieTuesdays With Morrie
Tuesdays with Morrie Essay
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Pages • 3
As Morrie Schwartz faces his terminal disease, ALS, he inspires Mitch Albom with his many aphorisms and life lessons. In tuesdays with Morrie, Morrie is the teacher, Mitch is the student, Morrie’s home is the classroom, and the lesson is life. As the modern transcendentalist, Morrie teaches Mitch about life, every Tuesday. They discuss a plethora of topics, including death, marriage, and forgiveness. The day you realize we are going to die, is the day you change the way you…...
Tuesdays With Morrie
How do the themes of Hamlet relate to modern life?
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There are some people who think that the theme in Hamlet, written by Shakespeare, is general and applies to our modern life. The truth is that there are a lot of differences between our modern world and Hamlet's world. Hamlet does not apply to our modern life. This is because is Shakespeare's time, women seem to be weak and easy to control, revenge appears to be in every family and Shakespeare makes it clear that there are a lot of…...
HamletRevengeTuesdays With Morrie
Tuesdays with Morrie Summary
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Summary of Tuesdays with Morrie Major Characters Morrie Schwartz - The novel is centered around him; Morrie is Mitch's previous college teacher who was identified with ALS (Lou Gherig's disease); he satisfies with Mitch in his home every Tuesday to teach him about the meaning of life. Mitch Albom- Morrie's former trainee; he has since become a journalist and leads an extremely quick paced life; discovers Morrie after hearing he is ill on "ABC's Nightline" and check outs him every…...
Tuesdays With Morrie
Tuesdays with Morrie Themes
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The Tuesdays with Morrie, written by Mitch Albom is the true story of an old college professor and a prior student now facing life, death, and time. Throughout the story, Albom shows many morals, themes, and life lessons; however three themes truly stood out within this story. Mitch Albom specifically pointed out to the reader the three specific themes of friendship, truth, and the sad reality that everybody dies. Albom showed the theme of friendship within the book, by presenting…...
Tuesdays With Morrie
The Acquisition of Wisdom In King Lear and Tuesdays With Morrie
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Wisdom is a trait mostly associated with the elderly and highly valued in today’s world. However, do all old men truly possess wisdom merely because they can see their own deaths in the near future? In both King Lear by William Shakespeare and Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom, the protagonists acquire wisdom after undergoing trials of sufferings and tribulations. Despite learning similar lessons, both of these men begin their quest as completely different people. Morrie, the main character in…...
King LearTuesdays With Morrie
Case Analysis (Tuesdays with Morrie)
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CASE ANALYSIS: TUESDAYS WITH MORRIE Synopsis Morrie was Mitch's favourite instructor. He was identified with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS. One night, Mitch saw and acknowledged his old teacher in a tv program. He suddenly remembered the pledge he made with his instructor, so he called him to establish a visit. Mitch started checking out Morrie every Tuesday and whenever they fulfill Morrie taught Mitch lessons about life. The disease gradually get rid of Morrie as days pass and during…...
Tuesdays With Morrie
Literary Analysis – Mr Van Gogh
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Owen Marshall’s ‘Mr Van Gogh’ addresses the inevitable issue of marginalisation of an individual. Through language features he influences the reader to reflect and consider action of the attitudes towards the socially marginalised. The social rejection of an individual is described through the voice of the town bully, and the cowardly acts of the narrator. Set in a small town in New Zealand it serves as a microcosm of contemporary society. Marshall presents a parable to educate the reader so…...
Tuesdays With MorrieVincent Van Gogh
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ALS is a progressive disease affecting motor function. As each Tuesday passed, Morrie gradually lost voluntary motor skills, but as his body began to deteriorate his high spirit remained. Morrie embraced living, aging, and dying which is why his story has been read by millions of people around the world. Our own mortality is something we all must face, and Morrie encourages us to embrace death so that we may know how to live.

The Seventh Tuesday: We Talk about the Fear of Aging, was the most impactful chapter of Tuesdays with Morrie for me because it talks about how we need to embrace aging. As I have gotten older, I have feared aging because I have witnessed what it has done to others that I care about. My great-grandmother had Alzheimer’s Disease, and my grandmother has Dementia. I have a high possibility of developing either one of these conditions. This is what scares me the most, but I am not necessarily scared for myself. I am more afraid for those who will have to take care of me and see me in such a delicate condition. I have seen both my great-grandfather and grandfather deal with the frustration that comes with both ailments. If I do not develop these conditions, I may not fear aging as much. However, I do fear losing my independence because I would find it embarrassing for someone to have to take care of me. Morrie gave me a new perspective on aging. Morrie, like me, feared losing his independence and “felt a little ashamed,” but later learned to accept and appreciate losing his independence (115). He talked about how it took him “back to being a child again… [and that] we all yearn in some way to return to those days when we were completely taken care of” (116). When I first read this, I did not agree fully but then thought about when I am sick and how all I want is to be loved and taken care of. Is aging really like that? I know that there will come a point when I will envy the youth because I will no longer be capable of doing certain tasks. Morrie said that “if you’ve found meaning in your life, you don’t want to go back. You want to go forward. You want to see more, do more. You can’t wait until sixty-five” (118). I am still a little hesitant on accepting aging, but Morrie gave me a new perspective on it.

In the chapter, The Fourth Tuesday: We talk about Death, Morrie reminds us that we need to truly live and accept death. I am not necessarily afraid of death because of my religion. I am a Christian and believe that by obeying and following Christ’s example, I will go to heaven after I die. Since I was a child, I have understood death because of my faith. When I was younger I read stories in the bible and that included death; the most important death was Jesus Christ. I am not afraid of death itself, but what comes before death. This includes aging and what I may not have accomplished by the time I die. Most of my life I have dealt with anxiety and depression and when I was younger I thought that everyone had these feelings. Once I started to become an adult I realized that these intense emotions were not normal. Since I was in middle school, my anxiety and depression have kept me from experiencing the world fully. I would be too anxious or depressed to go out into the world. I still have these feelings some days but have methods to cope with the emotions. I recognize that I am young and can die at any time, but I do not think I have not fully accepted that. I never think, “Could today be my last day on earth?” Morrie pointed out that “Once you learn how to die, you learn how to live” (82). I find this quote inspirational, but also do not understand exactly what Morrie means by learning how to die. Do I just need to accept that death is inevitable and that it can happen to me anytime? There are many things that I will want to do before I die. It sounds very cliché, but I really want to travel the world. I have already done a lot of traveling, but I want to travel in a converted van. I understand I would need resources to accomplish this, but I also do not want to wait until I am older and retired. I do not necessarily want to be attending college currently but know that it is something that I must do. This reminds me of when Morrie said, “We really don’t experience the world fully, because we’re half-asleep, doing things we automatically think we have to do” (83). I completely agree with Morrie because it describes a large portion of the world, and myself. Morrie may not be talking about traveling the world, but we do go about life as a series of tasks that need to be done.

The Ninth Tuesday: We Talk about How Love Goes on, emphasizes listening and being fully present when with others and throughout our everyday lives. The world is filled with people who are constantly on the go, myself included. Everybody always has a destination in mind and are trying to cross the next thing or task off their list. When I am not working or furthering my education, I watch shows and films on Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu. Sometimes I wonder, “What kind of life is this and am I simply existing?” Last year when I attended Wichita State University, I made a lot of friends and constantly felt full of life. Unfortunately, I lost contact with most of these friends once I moved to Hays. I do still have one good friend that I am in constant contact with. I live alone off-campus and only attend two on-campus classes; therefore, I do not have any friends in Hays. Since I started living alone, I began to appreciate the time I spend with my family. Whenever I get to see and visit them I try to be fully present and engaged. I do not get to talk that often, so when I am with them I really try to be with them. Listening and being fully engaged is something that I am trying to improve on every day. I loved the way Mitch described being with Morrie. When talking about how Morrie was with him he said, “He looked you straight in the eye, and he listened as if you were the only person in the world” (135). When I was younger, I was always taught how to listen, but it was always something I brushed off because I thought that I knew how to listen. Over the years, I’ve tried to get better at listening and it is important to be reminded of how it feels when you are truly being listened to. I hope to have a family of my own someday and am constantly searching (and looking forward) to that. I also know that family and friends are how I will live on. Morrie said, “Love is how you stay alive, even after you are gone” (133). I believe this is something that many people already understand and just need to be reminded of it—I certainly did.

These three lessons spoke to me the most, but truthfully the entire book did. I cannot remember the last time I read a book that was not in textbook form. I used to read all the time as a child and now only read academically. While reading this book I realized how much I missed reading and how this book was the perfect place to start. There are so many great lessons that Morrie gave, and I can see why it is used in this course. Morrie helped me confront my own mortality and reminded me how to truly live. As I was reading I would highlight quotes that spoke to me. When I finished the book, I noticed that the pages were filled with color and wisdom. What stuck out to me the most was what Morrie called the tension of opposites. “Life is a series of pulls back and forth. You want to do one thing, but you are bound to something else. Something hurts you, yet you know it shouldn’t. You take certain things for granted, even when you know you should never take anything for granted… Which side wins? Love wins. Love always wins” (40). I am not going to say that the book was life-changing, but I certainly have a new perspective on aging and death.

Tuesdays with Morrie is a memoir written by Mitch Albom. Mitch recounts the time he spent with Morrie Schwartz, a sociology professor that taught at Brandeis University, that was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ALS is a progressive disease affecting motor function. As each Tuesday passed, Morrie gradually lost voluntary motor skills, but as his body began to deteriorate his high spirit remained. Morrie embraced living, aging, and dying which is why his story has been read by millions of people around the world. Our own mortality is something we all must face, and Morrie encourages us to embrace death so that we may know how to live.

The Seventh Tuesday: We Talk about the Fear of Aging, was the most impactful chapter of Tuesdays with Morrie for me because it talks about how we need to embrace aging. As I have gotten older, I have feared aging because I have witnessed what it has done to others that I care about. My great-grandmother had Alzheimer’s Disease, and my grandmother has Dementia. I have a high possibility of developing either one of these conditions. This is what scares me the most, but I am not necessarily scared for myself. I am more afraid for those who will have to take care of me and see me in such a delicate condition. I have seen both my great-grandfather and grandfather deal with the frustration that comes with both ailments. If I do not develop these conditions, I may not fear aging as much. However, I do fear losing my independence because I would find it embarrassing for someone to have to take care of me. Morrie gave me a new perspective on aging. Morrie, like me, feared losing his independence and “felt a little ashamed,” but later learned to accept and appreciate losing his independence (115). He talked about how it took him “back to being a child again… [and that] we all yearn in some way to return to those days when we were completely taken care of” (116). When I first read this, I did not agree fully but then thought about when I am sick and how all I want is to be loved and taken care of. Is aging really like that? I know that there will come a point when I will envy the youth because I will no longer be capable of doing certain tasks. Morrie said that “if you’ve found meaning in your life, you don’t want to go back. You want to go forward. You want to see more, do more. You can’t wait until sixty-five” (118). I am still a little hesitant on accepting aging, but Morrie gave me a new perspective on it.

In the chapter, The Fourth Tuesday: We talk about Death, Morrie reminds us that we need to truly live and accept death. I am not necessarily afraid of death because of my religion. I am a Christian and believe that by obeying and following Christ’s example, I will go to heaven after I die. Since I was a child, I have understood death because of my faith. When I was younger I read stories in the bible and that included death; the most important death was Jesus Christ. I am not afraid of death itself, but what comes before death. This includes aging and what I may not have accomplished by the time I die. Most of my life I have dealt with anxiety and depression and when I was younger I thought that everyone had these feelings. Once I started to become an adult I realized that these intense emotions were not normal. Since I was in middle school, my anxiety and depression have kept me from experiencing the world fully. I would be too anxious or depressed to go out into the world. I still have these feelings some days but have methods to cope with the emotions. I recognize that I am young and can die at any time, but I do not think I have not fully accepted that. I never think, “Could today be my last day on earth?” Morrie pointed out that “Once you learn how to die, you learn how to live” (82). I find this quote inspirational, but also do not understand exactly what Morrie means by learning how to die. Do I just need to accept that death is inevitable and that it can happen to me anytime? There are many things that I will want to do before I die. It sounds very cliché, but I really want to travel the world. I have already done a lot of traveling, but I want to travel in a converted van. I understand I would need resources to accomplish this, but I also do not want to wait until I am older and retired. I do not necessarily want to be attending college currently but know that it is something that I must do. This reminds me of when Morrie said, “We really don’t experience the world fully, because we’re half-asleep, doing things we automatically think we have to do” (83). I completely agree with Morrie because it describes a large portion of the world, and myself. Morrie may not be talking about traveling the world, but we do go about life as a series of tasks that need to be done.

The Ninth Tuesday: We Talk about How Love Goes on, emphasizes listening and being fully present when with others and throughout our everyday lives. The world is filled with people who are constantly on the go, myself included. Everybody always has a destination in mind and are trying to cross the next thing or task off their list. When I am not working or furthering my education, I watch shows and films on Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu. Sometimes I wonder, “What kind of life is this and am I simply existing?” Last year when I attended Wichita State University, I made a lot of friends and constantly felt full of life. Unfortunately, I lost contact with most of these friends once I moved to Hays. I do still have one good friend that I am in constant contact with. I live alone off-campus and only attend two on-campus classes; therefore, I do not have any friends in Hays. Since I started living alone, I began to appreciate the time I spend with my family. Whenever I get to see and visit them I try to be fully present and engaged. I do not get to talk that often, so when I am with them I really try to be with them. Listening and being fully engaged is something that I am trying to improve on every day. I loved the way Mitch described being with Morrie. When talking about how Morrie was with him he said, “He looked you straight in the eye, and he listened as if you were the only person in the world” (135). When I was younger, I was always taught how to listen, but it was always something I brushed off because I thought that I knew how to listen. Over the years, I’ve tried to get better at listening and it is important to be reminded of how it feels when you are truly being listened to. I hope to have a family of my own someday and am constantly searching (and looking forward) to that. I also know that family and friends are how I will live on. Morrie said, “Love is how you stay alive, even after you are gone” (133). I believe this is something that many people already understand and just need to be reminded of it—I certainly did.

Conclusion

These three lessons spoke to me the most, but truthfully the entire book did. I cannot remember the last time I read a book that was not in textbook form. I used to read all the time as a child and now only read academically. While reading this book I realized how much I missed reading and how this book was the perfect place to start. There are so many great lessons that Morrie gave, and I can see why it is used in this course. Morrie helped me confront my own mortality and reminded me how to truly live. As I was reading I would highlight quotes that spoke to me. When I finished the book, I noticed that the pages were filled with color and wisdom. What stuck out to me the most was what Morrie called the tension of opposites. “Life is a series of pulls back and forth. You want to do one thing, but you are bound to something else. Something hurts you, yet you know it shouldn’t. You take certain things for granted, even when you know you should never take anything for granted… Which side wins? Love wins. Love always wins” (40). I am not going to say that the book was life-changing, but I certainly have a new perspective on aging and death.

FAQ about Tuesdays With Morrie

How do the themes of Hamlet relate to modern life?
...Revenge is not something common in our modern life. Revenge is an important thing in Hamlet. Women appear as symbols that represent weakness. In our modern world, women are as good as men and they are not weak at all. With att these weaknesses, the w...

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