The Darkness out there Essay

Custom Student Mr. Teacher ENG 1001-04 12 November 2017

The Darkness out there

Changing the mood during a story makes it more exciting and less predictable which captivates the reader’s interest. Both stories show evidence of significant mood change, which created a successful amount of suspense when I read them. The endings of the three stories are all quite similar because the characters die at the end because of what they have been through. “Frankenstein” ends as it began with letters written from Walton to his sister. Frankenstein has journeyed to the Arctic in pursuit of his creation and has lived to tell the extraordinary tale of his life.

The reader finds out that the end of Frankenstein’s story was in the prologue and everything is pieced together, for example, the sighting of the “gigantic stature” in the beginning. After completing his story, Frankenstein dies on the boat and his monster finds him. The compassion he once felt for his creator returns to him as he confesses he wants to die too. The morals used throughout the story are summed up here in part of the monster’s speech. “… I, the miserable and the abandoned, am an abortion, to be spurned at, and kicked, and trampled on…

” Here, Shelley communicates the idea that everyone should be loved no matter how they look. This could be related to many modern issues, for example, a mother abandoning her baby. The ending matched the theme of the story, e. g. death and bereavement, and was very detailed. I liked the way the letters at the beginning and the end made the story very complete, and gave the story more of a purpose to be told. Walton wanted to hear it; Frankenstein wanted to tell it. Many of the ideas Shelley used in the novel were talked about by the monster at the end which also made the story educational because it talked about very realistic issues.

In “The Raven” Poe leaves you unsure about the ending he has written. It is quite evident that the man is dead and the raven has frightened the man to death because his “soul from out that shadow lies floating on the floor”, which seems as if he has left his body but we are never sure why. The only evidence we have is that the man was a firm believer of superstition and maybe he was so scared of the thought of dying that it killed him. This is like the ending in “The Tell Tale Heart”, also by Edgar Allan Poe. At the end you know that the younger man has killed the older man but you can’t figure out why.

Poe lets the readers decide for themselves what has truly happened which involves their imaginations, which makes it a more memorable ending because the reader has had to think about it more. In “Man Overboard” it is safe to assume that a shark killed the man because he was praying to die and suddenly “His last appeal had been heard” and a fin “approached him slowly”. In “Frankenstein” and “Man Overboard” the men wanted to die so the ending is satisfactory to the character and reader because it was what was expected.

In one of the stories it might have been better to keep the character alive for longer to create more fear in the character’s mind which would have built up more suspense in the story if the character had to keep going through more horror. The ending of “The Raven” was good because the man didn’t want to die but he did. This made the story more horrific because the character didn’t want what happened in the end, making him more frightened and adding more fear and tension to the story for the reader because they could be so involved in the story that they would feel what the character is feeling.

Linking ideas throughout a story is an effective way of keeping a reader interested. It keeps the story exciting if the reader is able to piece parts of different plots together. However, if the writer continually keeps inventing new plots that have no relevance to any of the current ones and make up a new story on their own, the reader may start to lose interest because it may confuse them. In “Frankenstein”, Shelley links many plots to one another as the novel progresses. This helps the reader to develop a clearer understanding of what is happening because each plot supports another one.

The letters in “Frankenstein” are a good example of the way Shelley links different character’s ideas together in the story. The letters Frankenstein received when he was away at Ingolstadt were about what was happening at his home. These letters made it easier for me to understand the story when Frankenstein returned home because all of the information had already been supplied about the environment and characters. I didn’t have to concentrate on figuring out things about the story, which made it easier to read.

The letters acting as the prologue and epilogue from Walton to his sister also linked the story together very well. When I had finished the story I realised what everything meant at the beginning, for example when Frankenstein said to Walton “I have lost everything and cannot begin life anew”. Reading statements like that at the beginning built up a lot of suspense and made me want to keep reading to find out more. This helped me enjoy the story more because I was always searching for something to find out about in the text.

In “The Raven”, Poe links ideas with words, rhyme and verse structure. The way he wrote about the raven saying “Nevermore” at the end of each verse gave the plot more continuation because it provided a reason for man to keep reacting to in the next verse. It made me wonder whether the raven would say anything else so it kept me interested. The verses and the rhyming patterns are very structured, which linked each verse of the story together because they were of similar length and sound.

The way the rhyming of the ‘ore’ sound kept appearing in the same places in each verse gave the poem more rhythm and familiarity and linked the verses together even more because I was able to tell when the next rhyme would be. In “Man Overboard”, Churchill links the song with the setting very well. This is very important because the song is the cause of the ending of the story. “Rowdy Dowdy Boys” is a sea song and as the story is set on a ship, this makes it very appropriate and makes the atmosphere feel more realistic.

It makes it easier to imagine the song being sung in its surroundings and puts the story into context more effectively. The main difference between these two stories is the type of language they contain because of the different periods they were written in, and the effect the language has on the style of the story. “The Old Nurse’s Story” and “The Darkness Out There were written in different periods of history. “The Old Nurse’s Story” uses a more formal style of English.. The style of writing in “The Darkness Out There” may still be used in writing today.

The style of language used in each story makes them very different from each other and we can identify the period in which they were written in very easily by looking at some of the words used and things written about that were popular at that time. I found that both stories contain many realistic and relevant ideas about morals and the contrasting behaviour of adults and children. Mukwinda Phiri 10Wn English 7 Show preview only The above preview is unformatted text This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Mary Shelley section.

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  • University/College: University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Date: 12 November 2017

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