Sociology and Family Essay

Custom Student Mr. Teacher ENG 1001-04 3 July 2016

Sociology and Family

In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society.

Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows:

The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution

In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two

of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined

the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that

the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction.

It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies.

Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults.

Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies.

He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal. Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring.

At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society. George Peter Murdock: the family – a universal social institution In a study entitled Social Structure (1949), George Peter Murdock examined the institution of the family in a wide range of societies. Murdock took a sample of 250 societies, ranging from small hunting and gathering bands to large-scale industrial societies. He claimed that some form of family existed in every society, and concluded, on the evidence of his sample, that the family is universal.

Murdock defined the family as follows: The family is a social group characterized by common residence, economic cooperation and reproduction. It includes adults of both sexes, at least two of whom maintain a socially approved sexual relationship, and one or more children, own or adopted, of the sexually cohabiting adults. Murdock, 1949 Thus the family lives together, pools its resources and works together, and produces offspring. At least two of the adult members conduct a sexual relationship according to the norms of their particular society. Such norms vary from society to society.

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