Shoe-Horn Sonata Essay

Custom Student Mr. Teacher ENG 1001-04 19 March 2016

Shoe-Horn Sonata

The notion of the distinctively visual can be seen as a process of connecting an image with an idea, the distinctive quality of the visual lies in its capacity to elicit a powerful response and plant it within the reader’s mind, in order to cultivate as the themes, characters and plot of the material begins to broaden. Distinctively visual texts have the power to provoke reactions from responders whether that would be reactions of pleasure or anger and most intentions of distinctive visuals is to provoke us to question embedded notions of normalcy or challenge us to think in new ways and to most importantly understand the image being evoked by composers as they rely on language or visual techniques to induce distinctive visuals in their readers imagination. Whether a distinctive visual is perceived as negative or positive is sometimes shaped by the life experiences of the responder.

The play “The Shoe-Horn sonata” by John Misto uses distinctively visual to convey the distinctive experiences and to influence the audience’s response to the characters and events in the text. The dramatic and theatrical devices, written techniques and strong visual imagery function accordingly to communicate the ideas of heroism, death, trauma, crimes against humanity and lastly survival. In the play “The Shoe-Horn sonata” we the audience are firstly introduced in Act one, Scene 3 to one of the key themes being heroism. As the two main protagonists Bridie and Sheila describe their first sightings of each other as they desperately float at sea, Bridie describes her multiple attempts of saving Sheilas life as she “nods off”, Bridie hits her with her shoe-horn, as Sheila describes “whack, whack, whack” and “tap, tap, tap”. Through the use of repetitive hyperbolized onomatopoeia and the heroic symbolism of the shoe-horn, Misto has cleverly juxtaposed these characters to show such heroism as Bridie realistically saves Sheila by such an emblematic item being the shoe horn.

Also to create realism throughout the moments of this scene the use of distant sounds of lapping waves play in which this assists in creating a sense of immediacy and puts forward the notion of heroism that needed to be displayed to overcome such horrendous condition in which these girls went through. Overall Misto manipulates the responder to evoke the heroic images, as he enables the audience to empathise with the characters on such a heroic journey. In contrast, within Scene 8 of Act one the play also influences the audience’s response to the characters and events by dealing with the theme of death. The confrontational approach of death, as quoted in italics “Bridie slaps Sheila” then followed by “you’re alive today because of me, and don’t you ever forget it”, through the stage directions, and dialogue this particular scene unravels the sudden realisation of death that the two protagonists faced as their journey was hitting a rough hit, also as Sheila states with a more saddened les aggressive tone “I hated those coffins..

I wasn’t going to see you in one” The notion of the distinctively visual can be seen as a process of connecting an image with an idea, the distinctive quality of the visual lies in its capacity to elicit a powerful response and plant it within the reader’s mind, in order to cultivate as the themes, characters and plot of the material begins to broaden. Distinctively visual texts have the power to provoke reactions from responders whether that would be reactions of pleasure or anger and most intentions of distinctive visuals is to provoke us to question embedded notions of normalcy or challenge us to think in new ways and to most importantly understand the image being evoked by composers as they rely on language or visual techniques to induce distinctive visuals in their readers imagination. Whether a distinctive visual is perceived as negative or positive is sometimes shaped by the life experiences of the responder.

The play “The Shoe-Horn sonata” by John Misto uses distinctively visual to convey the distinctive experiences and to influence the audience’s response to the characters and events in the text. The dramatic and theatrical devices, written techniques and strong visual imagery function accordingly to communicate the ideas of heroism, death, trauma, crimes against humanity and lastly survival. In the play “The Shoe-Horn sonata” we the audience are firstly introduced in Act one, Scene 3 to one of the key themes being heroism. As the two main protagonists Bridie and Sheila describe their first sightings of each other as they desperately float at sea, Bridie describes her multiple attempts of saving Sheilas life as she “nods off”, Bridie hits her with her shoe-horn, as Sheila describes “whack, whack, whack” and “tap, tap, tap”. Through the use of repetitive hyperbolized onomatopoeia and the heroic symbolism of the shoe-horn, Misto has cleverly juxtaposed these characters to show such heroism as Bridie realistically saves Sheila by such an emblematic item being the shoe horn.

Also to create realism throughout the moments of this scene the use of distant sounds of lapping waves play in which this assists in creating a sense of immediacy and puts forward the notion of heroism that needed to be displayed to overcome such horrendous condition in which these girls went through. Overall Misto manipulates the responder to evoke the heroic images, as he enables the audience to empathise with the characters on such a heroic journey. In contrast, within Scene 8 of Act one the play also influences the audience’s response to the characters and events by dealing with the theme of death. The confrontational approach of death, as quoted in italics “Bridie slaps Sheila” then followed by “you’re alive today because of me, and don’t you ever forget it”, through the stage directions, and dialogue this particular scene unravels the sudden realisation of death that the two protagonists faced as their journey was hitting a rough hit, also as Sheila states with a more saddened les aggressive tone “I hated those coffins.. I wasn’t going to see you in one”

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  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Date: 19 March 2016

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