Science Essay Examples

Essays on Science

GMO Food: Advantages and Disadvantages
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Pages • 6
The main debates goes in a sense that if something is part of a basic need then why is it not free? We all need maize and wheat in our diets. What is genetic engineering? It is any direct manipulation of an organism’s genes. Examples of genetic engineering applicable to GMO grains: Maize – Specific maize has been genetically engineered to express desirable traits in agriculture. Which includes resistance to pests and herbicides. Maize is also produced in a sense…...
Genetically Modified Food – Good or Bad?
Words • 1842
Pages • 8
Do you ever pay attention to what nutrients you are feeding your body? Do you know what it is made up of? Is it GMO free? Genetically modified organism also known as GMO is defined as a result of laboratory test where a DNA from one organism is removed and then synthetically inserted into another organism that is not of the same vegetation. Today I am here to talk about a common asked claim “GMO food can solve the world’s…...
Are Genetically Modified Foods Safe
Words • 1741
Pages • 7
Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been the subject of debate for many years, with many people either completely for or completely against their mass production and sale. But what exactly is a GMO? Genetically modified organisms ( GMOs ) is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. These techniques generally known as recombinant DNA technology, use DNA molecules from different sources which are combined into one molecule to create a new set of genes. This…...
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Important Role of Genetically Modified Organisms in Our World Today
Words • 1881
Pages • 8
The amount of people that are currently suffering from starvation and famine is not only troubling but is inhumane. Most of these families that are extremely malnourished and facing life-threatening conditions are located in areas of the world where the environment is harsh and growing food is a futile task. Food aid foundation reports that 1 in 7 people go hungry daily ('World Hunger Statistics,' n.d.). Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are a great solution to help fight this global crisis.…...
GMO’s and the Developing World
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Pages • 11
For many years, people have intervened with the originality of plants and fruits for consumption. The fermentation of grains to create beer, aging grapes for wine, and using yeast for baking purposes all require some type of modification to the original state of the plant/fruit. Nowadays, technology is interfering with food with the usage of GMO’s and biotechnology. GMO stands for a genetically modified organism, which are organisms whose genetic material has been altered in a way that does not…...
Properties of Free Radicals
Words • 523
Pages • 3
At the end of the 1930s, a group of chemists proved that natural rubber degradation is due to successive and destructive attacks of atoms or unstable molecules, ie free radicals. Any matter, consists of infinitesimal particles: the atoms. At the core of these atoms are the protons and the neutrons, and the electrons rotate around it, which couple together, forming a relatively stable combination. Free radical is a molecule that has lost an electron with electric charge, eager to mate,…...
Summary of Hominid Gene Diversity
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Pages • 2
The article questions whether or not a lack of genetic diversity could have contributed to the extinction of archaic humans. Those involved in the study used neanderthal, denisovan and modern human DNA to gather evidence for the theory. The article compiles data on the genomes of modern and archaic hominins and then see if the data provides evidence that suggests that a lack of genetic immune diversity played a role in their demise. The data presented is the ratios of…...
7 Ways Music Affects Your Mood and Emotions
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Pages • 4
Neil in his article presents the seven different ways music influence human beings’ mood and emotions in the world. Having no souvenir traces of its real origin but just paintings discovered in caves and some jewelry, it lets scientists believe that all that happened deliberately for a reason. Through those beliefs, scientist seems to assert that music affects our emotions in the ways that aid in the intercommunication and consolidation of people in groups. He also mentions that generally, people…...
Basic Principles of Genetics: Mendel’s Genetics
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Pages • 2
Ever wonder how you got your “grandfather’s nose”? Or why you have curly hair like your mother and your brother doesn’t? Genes. They are the basic unit by which genetic information is passed on from parent to child. This is also called heredity. Genes are a part of DNA and people inherit them from both of their parents during reproduction. The ones they inherit will determine many things, like what a child will look like and whether they will have…...
Epigenetics: The Science of Change
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Pages • 5
Genetics is the study of heredity which is a biological process where a parent passes certain genes onto their children or offspring. This traditional theory is now being challenged by a new area of study focusing on epigenetics. Epigenetics is rapidly increasing within society today providing people with the opportunity to understand things that previously were not recognised. Deoxyribonucleic acid, commonly known as DNA, is the genetic material in humans and almost all other organisms. DNA information is collected as…...
Heart Disease: Risk Factors, Prevention, and More
Words • 1800
Pages • 8
Cardiology Disorder Predict and analysis of cardiology disorder to considering the parameters like age, gender, pressure level, heart rate, diabetes and shortly. Since various factors are concerned in cardiology disorder, the prediction of this wellness is difficult. A number of the key symptoms of attack are Chest tightness. Shortness of breath. Nausea, stomach upset, Heartburn, or stomach pain. Sweating and Fatigue. Pressure within the higher back Pain that spreads to the arm. the subsequent are the kind of cardiology diseases:…...
Client Education: Heart Disease
Words • 1995
Pages • 8
Patient education on cardiovascular illnesses empowers people who may or may not be exposed to the disease. This is in line with the idea of establishing health policy initiatives to enhance patient empowerment (Bravo et al., 2015). Patient-led coaching and education initiatives are more effective in prevention of heart disease (Bravo et al., 2015). This paper presents an education plan targeting older adults and other individuals who may be at risk of developing heart disease. Learner Population and Overall Goals…...
The Genetic Diversity of HIV Infection
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Pages • 4
Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) displays a high degree of genetic variability and is grouped into two major types, namely type 1 and type 2, both of which are further divided into subtypes based on gene sequence data. Genetic variability, as well as rapid genetic mutations causing morphological changes, poses a major challenge in developing an AIDS vaccine. The viral genetic material is enclosed inside a membrane known as the envelope, which harbors molecules including proteins and glycoproteins that are essential…...
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and AIDS Treatment & Prevention
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Pages • 2
What is HIV? Human Immunodeficiency Virus also known as HIV is a virus that has been shown as the cause of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome). AIDS is the last stage of a HIV infection. HIV falls into a group of viruses know as retroviruses. Prevention Methods Preventing HIV can be quite an easy task if you know the right steps to take and how to do it. Some Prevention Methods for stopping someone/yourself from transmitting…...
The Human Condition Analytical Essay
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Pages • 7
The Human Condition is a concept that can be defined from numerous viewpoints depending on your culture, religion, upbringing, and current status. The customary definition given for the ‘Human Condition’ is, “the ability to rebound and to heal is the normality for every individual no matter their physical abilities, when we are knocked down we get back up and continue forward, it’s in all of us.” ('The human condition', 2019) These emotions are uniform in every human being that results…...
Critical Thinking and Analytical Thinking Comparison Essay
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To think critically encompasses one’s cognitive ability to look past the ostensible attestations offered by the writer or portrayer of the message and instead delve into the issues from various perspectives with an open mind. Evaluative thinking demands that we discern the sender’s (of the message or information) approach or standpoint to the topics subjectivity skews even the most seemingly credible academic data, and ensure that it is applicable to our research, after which you deduce whether to accept or…...
“My Free-Range Parenting Manifesto” Analytical Summary
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Is Lenore Skenazy the world's worst mom? In 2008, there was an article released, “My Free-Range Parenting Manifesto,' stating that a mother named Lenore Skenazy allowed her 9-year-old to ride a subway bus unsupervised. This event sparked controversy with many people because many believe that times have changed, and the crime rates have increased over the years. Skenazy later encouraged parents and non-parents with problem-solving skills, innovation, and confidence towards building protectiveness and still have the freedom many people had…...
“To Kill a Mockingbird” Comparison Essay
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To continue, convergence and divergence can be seen in isolation, which can cause psychological damage, resulting in tragedy. In To Kill a Mockingbird, Boo Radley is a highlight character to reflect the seclusion. In accordance with Scout: “Inside the house lived a malevolent phantom. People said he existed, but Jem and I had never seen him” (Lee 9). He has been mistreated by his father and been isolated for a fifth-teen year. He does not leave his house. Nobody knows…...
Analytical Essay: Transportation Methods in 19th Century
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The 19th century marked a dramatic change in the United States. Through the production of many new developments, this time period allowed the US to grow economically while allowing many middle-class workers to benefit from these alterations. The 19th century was also able to create better transportation methods to more efficiently transport goods and to gain better value for their products. Throughout this essay, we will explore the most memorable expansion of the United States during this time. We will…...
Analyze of Sub-Optimal Service Process
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Pages • 6
Introduction The purpose of this essay is to analyze a sub-optimal service process. The article starts with dissatisfied service experience, followed by an analysis of customer's wants from service apply a job map. Then it covers different components of service quality (reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and tangibles) by looking at the difference between the expected service and perceived service. The next part of this essay, it discusses the influence of service quality on the company's competitive advantage. How to recover…...
Analytical Framework Analysis
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Pages • 6
The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is one of the most prestigious universities in the United States. It is listed as #3 on U.S.New's best colleges. You can imagine my surprise when I read an article from The New Yorker highlighting the most recent scandal involving MIT’s media lab. In reading this article, I learned that MIT’s media lab accepted donations from Jeffrey Epstein, who is a convicted sex offender. Not only did the Media lab accept donations from Epstein,…...
The Problem of Human Alienation
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Pages • 5
Alienation is a very important issue in 21st C society that has the potential to affect anybody. Alienation is present in school, work, and other settings in life, and it is experienced by many people around the world. Alienation also means choosing not to be with anyone because of the feeling that you do not fit in. It is defined as the state of being an outsider or the feeling of being isolated from society. This condition may be caused…...
Scientific Method – How Knowledge is Made
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Pages • 5
Throughout the history of scientific develop there have been many a view and reflection on the scientific method and overall nature of science; these reflections and views have been the topic of much philosophical debate. These debates can lead to issues in determining the “apparent” rationality of the scientific method and nature of science (University of Queensland, 2019). Whilst it is commonly understood that science is a way of critically thinking about and analysing the empirical world around us; it…...
Scientific Literacy: Conceptual Overview
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Pages • 3
Scientific Literacy is a term that has been used since the late 1950’s to describe a desired knowledge about something related to science on the general public. In the history of science education there has been at least nine separate and distinct goals of science that are related to the goals of scientific literacy. In the history, it has been argued that instead of defining scientific literacy as prescribed learning and outcomes, scientific literacy should be conceptualized broadly enough for…...
The Structure of Scientific Writing
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The structure of a research paper or scientific writing includes several steps. These steps are described below. Abstract It must briefly introduce to reader our aim of study, methodology, results and findings. The abstract is a summary of our research. It is nearly as important as the title because the reader will be able to quickly read through it. In most scientific writing, the abstract can become divided into very short sections to guide the reader through the summaries. Keep…...
Scientific Management Approach
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Pages • 6
Introduction Scientific management may be described as science where workers have specific but different responsibilities. It is one of the first notable paradigm shifts in management style in the 20th century. The main objectives of scientific management can be described as follows: The development of a new mechanism for each part of a job replacing old rule-of-thumb methods. Selecting, training and developing workers in a scientific manner instead of self-selection of tasks and self-training by workers. The development of cooperation…...
Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies: Achievements and Challenges
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Behavioural therapy is rare that you can rely on the scientific method. Notions and techniques are examined scientifically and are regularly updated. The therapist and assessment happen all at once and the researched is constant. Assessments always commence at the start of the therapy when goals are set. The therapist’s job is to instruct, however, the client determines which behaviour to require to be modified, and the therapist reaches a decision in what way is best accomplished. The behavioural therapist…...
Scientific Methods and Knowledge
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Pages • 3
Introduction Scientific method is a method that scientists use to study natural phenomena, acquire new knowledge, or modify existing knowledge. Scientific methods must be scientific, observable, inferential, measurable, and consistent with the principles of reasoning. Scientific methods are considered to be the best objective framework for constructing the material world, including theoretical research, applied research, and rules, techniques, and models in the development and promotion of science. However, scientific methods are not always reliable. The results obtained using scientific methods…...
How Technology Changed Communication
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Pages • 6
In the 21st century that we live in, communication can be done in many different ways other than conventional speaking right in front of each other. The reason for that is because of the existence of communication technology and the wide interest in this technology from people around the world. Communication technology is improving as we speak and more important sector is depending on it to gain benefits such as business and politics. Communication technology includes telephone, radio, television, internet,…...
Disadvantages of Human Cloning
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Nowadays, Clone is a word that is heard throughout the world, especially the United States. Scientists have discovered a way to bring back extinct animals. Many people dream to extend a life time for their loves one and to be able to express their hidden feelings in their mind after their loved one has disappeared from their life. The idea that humans might someday be cloned in the future, but there is some scientific concern about cloning that may change…...
Ethical Concerns on the Use of Animals for Cloning
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Pages • 4
Abstract Medical research dating back to more than a century, with the accredited advances made in the development of drugs and treatments, involved to a great extent the use of animals. Currently, there are several alternatives to animal testing such as in vitro cell culture, microdosing, in silico computer simulation and non-invasive imaging technique. However, some emerging studies in the field of Medical Science are still utilizing animal models in research. This paper focuses on the concepts of xenotransplantation, cloning…...
An Inside Look at Equine Cloning
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Pages • 6
Abstract Equine cloning has been a major topic in the equine industry for the last sixteen years when the World’s first cloned Equus caballus (horse) was born in 2003. In the last twenty-two years, the first ever cloned animal was of “Dolly” the Ovis aries (sheep), which was born in 1996 at the Roslin Institute in Scotland. In recent years, cloned quarter and thoroughbred horses have been banned from equine associations such as the American Quarter Horse Association which has…...
Ethical Issues of Human Cloning
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Pages • 5
Cloning is the process of generating a genetically identical copy of a cell or an organism, which many scientists have not yet figured out how to do so. Over the years, cloning has become a worldwide controversy on whether it should be allowed or not. People would disagree saying that cloning goes against religious critics, “It’s like a man becoming creator”. Other people would agree by saying that, “It could cure some disorders”. I would disagree with cloning for many…...
The Ethical Implications of Human Cloning
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Pages • 7
The cloning of animals has been occurring from many years now in the advancement of time, the concept of human reproductive cloning has become a reality as with the breakthrough of biotechnology. Human reproductive cloning is a creation of an individual by nuclear transfer from existing human being to unnucleated ovum of another mammal that give rise to identical individual naturally or artificially. The child has born by this process that comes under new category of human being that is…...
Ethical and Policy Issues of Human Cloning
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Pages • 5
Human cloning refers to creating an exact genetic copy of a person. Cloning is first discovered by many people in 1996 when Dolly the sheep is cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). And that’s when exchange of views behind the idea of human cloning became an issue that causes many controversies including the positive effect of cloning but as well as the possible danger behind it and the moral problems it may cause, which resulted in human cloning to…...
A Journey into the Darkness: Symbolism in “The Fall of the House of Usher”
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Throughout Edgar Allan Poe’s life, he wrote many short stories with deeper meanings that could be found through psychology, “The Fall of the House of Usher” being one of them. When looking at a story from a psychological standpoint, the unconscious mind of the author can be interpreted and shown in the stories that the author has written. The psychoanalysis of a story simply builds on this by using Freudian’s theories of psychology. Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Fall of the…...
Nontraditional Health Care Practices
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Pages • 7
The use of nontraditional healthcare practices has continued to increase in the United States in the effort to complement conventional medicine. Nontraditional health practices use different techniques which may include the use of natural resources, osteopathy, and body systems that help the body to heal from the inside (Purnell, 2013). Scientific evidence has supported the efficacy of alternative medicines in addressing specific health issues. Most American cultures have adopted nontraditional healthcare practices that are passed down from one generation to…...
Why Trees Are So Important in Our New Smart Cities
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Pages • 9
Trees are very important in Buhara sub-county in the Kabale district for reasons like income generation, soil erosion control, biodiversity conservation, wood, and charcoal production among others. Eucalyptus species and Pinus species remain part of the dominant tree species planted in Buhara sub-county. Although these tree spp. are widely planted, the environmental effects of plantations comprised of exotic trees such as Eucalyptus spp. and Pinus spp. have been vigorously debated and reports such as drying up of watercourses, affecting the…...
The Effects on Depression and Working Memory
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Pages • 8
Depression is an illness that can affect all aspects of daily life because of its negative impact on thoughts, emotions, energy levels, and the focus of this paper, working memory. Depression can have many causes, including the stress generated by a demanding job and other common life activities, challenging family situations and events, hormones, genetics, drug and alcohol use, and personal loss and the resulting grief. Working memory briefly stores information that may be of immediate use during our waking…...
Memory Systems of the Brain
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Pages • 3
When thinking about memories many people group them into only two groups, which are short-term and long-term. Most people don’t know that when it comes to long-term memory you can categorize them into two groups, one being Explicit memory (declarative) and the second one would be Implicit memory (non-declarative). Within both of these categories, there are two more subdivisions. Knowing this people can learn how their memory works and what makes it a long-term memory. I know a few people…...
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Scientific Method – How Knowledge is Made
...In conclusion, it can clearly be seen that Popper’s Hypothetico-Deductivist Account of Science is far better than Chalmers’ inductive interpretation for deducing scientific knowledge. The claims presented in Alan Chalmers’ ‘Common view of Sci...
How Technology Changed Communication
...With global technology advancement, there is a great shift in communication in the 21st century. There has been the development of social media platforms where people engage in charts and exchange ideas and life experiences. These social media platfo...
Why Trees Are So Important in Our New Smart Cities
...Eucalyptus spp. and Pinus spp. are part of the dominant tree species planted in Buhara sub-county, Kabale district. Although these tree species are planted in various spatial patterns in the area to meet the demand for soil erosion control, timber, f...
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