Psychology Research Essay

Custom Student Mr. Teacher ENG 1001-04 17 February 2017

Psychology Research

  1. What are the main points of both articles?

Anxiety Disorder: Panic Attacks. It can happen anytime, anywhere. Unexpectedly, out of the blue, your heart starts to speed up, your face goes red and you go through shortness of breath. One feels dizzy, nauseated and out of control. A number of people even think like they’re dying. Such may be a person experiencing a panic attack — a sudden occurrence of powerful fear that induces grave physical reactions in the body (Campbell, 2002). Several people, believing they’re having a heart attack, go to the emergency room.

Others try to disregard the signs and symptoms, not comprehending that they’re experiencing a panic attack. A lot of women than men are disturbed by panic attacks. One-month prevalence estimates for women are 0.7% versus 0.3% for men (i.e., women are more likely to be affected than men by a 2- to 3-fold factor) (Daniels et al, 2006). And some people are experiencing frequent panic attacks, a condition known as panic disorder.

Panic Anxiety Disorder starts most often when people are 20-30 years old. It activates less often in teenagers or persons in their forties. It is unusual for the disorder to emerge in the elderly for the initial time. Though panic attacks were once set aside as nerves or stress, they’re now documented as a potentially immobilizing, but treatable health condition. An assortment of approaches, together with medications, therapy and relaxation methods, can help one manage or prevent panic attacks (Wilson, 2005).

Article #2: Children with Anxiety Disorder. Life is not easy for children these days. The fact that many adults suffer from mental illness of different kinds is enough to make people realize that children are even more susceptible to the same disease. It’s only good that a lot of breakthroughs are made especially in the area and study of mental illness. This study is even more significant in the light of the film Ordinary People, which has captured audiences worldwide decades ago. Precisely because the characters depict the “ordinariness” of each person and how representative they are to the masses, made this film a hit during its time. Ordinary People presents how malfunctioning individuals are as they go through each of their lives with the burden of mental illness.

The role of the mother in the film shows someone who has personality disorder, specifically dissociative disorder, while the spouse and father as having generalized anxiety disorder; and their son Conrad, as suffering with PTSD or Posttraumatic Stress Disorder. Mental health experts describe the illness through its signs and symptoms. It is typified by children experiencing severe fear – a powerful worry or the uneasiness that run or last for periods of time ((http://www.nimh.nih.gov).

When children sufferers are not treated, symptoms like these will present themselves through poor performance in academics, inability to relate with other children, low self-esteem, the use and abuse of illegal drugs including alcohol, and even anxiety disorder in adulthood (http://www.nimh.nih.gov).  Mental health experts describe the illness through its signs and symptoms. It is typified by children experiencing severe fear – a powerful worry or the uneasiness that run or last for periods of time ((http://www.nimh.nih.gov).

When children sufferers are not treated, symptoms like these will present themselves through poor performance in academics, inability to relate with other children, low self-esteem, the use and abuse of illegal drugs including alcohol, and even anxiety disorder in adulthood (http://www.nimh.nih.gov). This mental health problem usually runs in families. Oftentimes, the disorder appears alongside other physical and mental health problems; substance abuse, like alcohol, usually comes along (http://www.nimh.nih.gov) with it. Anxiety disorder manifests in different forms: 1.) Generalized Anxiety Disorder or GAD, 2.) Phobias, 3.) Separation Anxiety Disorder, 4.) Panic Disorder, 5.)OCD or Obsessive & Compulsive Disorder, and 6.) Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (Source: US Dept of Health, 1999 in http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov/).

  1. 2. What are the similarities and/or differences?

Similarities come in the form of the disorders’ signs and symptoms which include physical distress with Rapid heart rate , sweating, trembling , shortness of breath and hyperventilation, chills, hot flashes, nausea, abdominal cramping, chest pain, headache, dizziness, faintness, tightness in your throat, trouble swallowing, a sense of impending death . Other health problems — such as an impending heart attack, an overactive thyroid gland (hyperthyroidism) or drug withdrawal — can cause similar signs and symptoms. Individuals who experience panic attacks often are affected by other mental health conditions, including depression, fear of public places (agoraphobia) and social phobia (http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic1725.htm).

  1. What experiences have you had that relate to the topic or what have you learned in prior courses?

Researchers are not certain what bring about panic attacks. Heredity, stress and certain biochemical factors may play a part. A person’s chance of having panic attacks increases if she/he has a close family member who has had them. Numerous researchers think the body’s natural fight-or-flight reaction to danger is involved. For instance, if a snarling dog came after a child, his/her body would react automatically. The heart rate and breathing would race as the body readies itself for a life-threatening situation. A lot of the same responses take place in a panic attack. No noticeable stressor is nearby, but something trips the body’s alarm system. Persons having Panic attacks are no more likely than the average American to have suffered from emotional problems at the time the disorder begins (Wilson, 2005).

  1. How does your view point relate to the topics?)

Definitely, I agree from personal observation that these panic attacks and /or anxiety disorder though present only in the mind, “effectively’ renders a person “paralyzed” no matter his intelligence, status and persuasion in life. Imagine this picture: after months or years of incessant panic attacks and the constrained lifestyle produced by the distinctive avoidance behavior, the sufferer may develop into a demoralized and psychologically or physically depressed person. In addition, some sufferers resort to alcohol in an effort to self medicate or to reduce the sign and symptoms of the disorder. This significantly causes difficulties to the individual’s life and ability to seek suitable treatment. Unfortunately, one out of every five untreated sufferers attempts to end his or her life, not at all comprehending that there was chance for changes and treatment (Wilson, 2005).

As in the film as mentioned, it is interesting to note that despite such a troubled family, Conrad emerged to be someone who has conquered the odds in his life. The loss of a brother and its effects on him, being around with parents who exhibit a variety of symptoms that they themselves are also suffering, these things could have been too much for him or for anybody for that matter.

PTSD and other anxiety disorder sub-categories are very interesting types of mental health problems because of their prevalence – and in spite of that, still, many people most of the times, ignore the fact that they might be sufferers. Just as in the case of Conrad, ordinary people – the most common among the populace – are actually beset with extremely upsetting events and are left to themselves to cope as each day comes.

            To end, this study from researchers Craske et al shows the hope for sufferers: “With practice and encouragement or persuasion from the therapist the patient learns to reinterpret internal sensations from signals of loss of control and panic to cues that are intrinsically harmless and can be controlled with certain skills. The intentional creation of these signs by the client, coupled with success in coping with them, reduces their unpredictability and changes their meaning for the client” (Craske, Maidenbberg, & Bystritsky, 1995).

Reference:

For Children with Anxiety Disorder:

  1. Campbell, Nancy M. Panic disorder. Mankato, MN: LifeMatters, [2002]. 616.85 DYI VT
  2. Craske, MG; MAidenberg, E & Bystritsky A (1995). Brief Cogntive-behavioral versus nondirective therapy for panic disorder. Journal of Behavior Therapy & Experimental Psychiatry ; 26, 113-120.
  3. Giacobello, John. Everything you need to know about anxiety and panic attacks. New York: Rosen, [2000].
  1. Daniels C., Yerkes S., Bureau of Naval Personnel emedicine.2006.
  2. Wilson, Reid D., Don’t Panic: Taking Control of Anxiety Attacks The Revised Edition Of: Harper Perennial ISBN# 0-06-095160-5.

For panic Attacks Article:

  1. Davison, Gerald C., Neale, John 2001, Abnormal Psychology, Eighth Ed., John Wiley & Sons, Inc. New York.
  2. National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH) accessed in the Internet February 20, 2007 http://www.nimh.nih.gov.
  3. Surgeon general accessed in the internet February 20, 2007 http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/mentalhealth/chapter3/sec6.html.

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