Mark Twain

Early Life
Born in Florida, Missouri http://www.cmgww.com/historic/twain/about/bio.htm

Early Life
Born November 30, 1835 http://www.cmgww.com/historic/twain/about/bio.htm

Early Life
Parents where John Marshall Clemens, Jane Lampton Clemens. http://www.cmgww.com/historic/twain/about/bio.htm

Early Life
Mark twains father John Marshall was a lawyer. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Three years after Samuel came into the world, his parents’ seventh and last child was born, a son named Henry. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
As a child, Mark Twain received no formal schooling, but a keen learner, he widened his circle of knowledge by finding information in public libraries. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
From the time he was old enough to think about it, Samuel Clemens was enamored with the steamboat pilots and hoped to grow up to be one of them. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Poverty forced Mark Twains family to move out of his boyhood home. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Their family moved in with Dr. Grant’s family above Grant’s Drug Store in exchange for Jane’s services as a cook. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
In 1847, when Samuel was 12, his father died. Jane Clemens was left alone to support the family’s four surviving children. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Sam Clemens apprenticed to Joseph Ament http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
By the age of 16, Twain had left school for a job as an apprentice to a printer in Hannibal. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Through all his years in the printshop, Clemens tried his hand at composing humorous pieces, using the heavy-handed techniques of local colorists who were popular at the time. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Elder brother Orion returned to Hannibal in September, purchased Western Union newspaper, Sam began working for his brother. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Mark Twain became apprentice river pilot under Captain Horace Bixby of the Paul Jones. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Samuel returned to Missouri in 1857 to begin a two-year apprenticeship to become a steamboat pilot. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Henry Clemens, Sam’s younger brother, died June 21, 1858 as a result of injuries received in the explosion of the PENNSYLVANIA on June 13, 1858. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Clemens spent a few inglorious weeks as a volunteer in the Confederate army. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Mark Twain became second lieutenant. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
Orion and Samuel went to Carson City, where Clemens tried his luck with timber, then mining, then finally found a measure of success in 1862 as a feature writer for the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise. http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Early Life
It was as this paper’s reporter at the Nevada constitutional convention that Clemens began to sign his work “Mark Twain.” http://www.biography.com/people/mark-twain-9512564

Facts
In 1870, Clemens married Olivia Langdon. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Mark Twain and Olivia Langdon had four children, one of whom died in infancy and two who died in their twenties. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Haley’s Comet was visible in the sky on the night Mark Twain was born. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
He predicted that he would die when it returned 75 years later. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Twain’s birth name is Samuel Langhorne Clemens http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Clemens wrote under several pseudonyms before settling on Mark Twain. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
He also wrote as Sergeant Fathom, Rambler, Thomas Jefferson Snondgrass and W. Epaminondas Adrastus Blab. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Clemens died on April 21, 1910, the day after the comet’s orbit came closest to the Earth. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Mark Twain was fond of cats. His boyhood home is rumored to have been shared with as many as 19 cats. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
He fell in love with the technology and would later lose $300,000 investing in a new style of printing press. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
In 1907, Mark Twain received a Doctorate in Letters from Oxford University.http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Twain had a keen interest in science and technology and was a close friend of Dr. Nikola Tesla. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
His daughter Clara was married in the house in July 1909. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
And his daughter Jean died of an epileptic seizure there on the day before Christmas the same year. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
There are no direct heirs to Clemens surviving today. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Feeling the absence of grandchildren in his life, he also established a club for young girls he called his “angelfish” and corresponded with them often. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Mark twain is a riverboat cry. It means that the water is two fathoms, or twelve feet deep. In river talk, that tells pilots it is safe for their boats to move forward without touching the bottom. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
One of Twain’s final acts was approving a $6,000 check for the Library Building Fund. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
He dedicated the Library in the memory of his daughter Jean in Redding, Connecticut. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
The Mark Twain Library in Redding, Connecticut is the only library in the World that founded, funded and filled with books by Mark Twain himself. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
During the last years of his life, he was the vice-president of the American Anti-Imperialist League http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Toward the end of his life, Clemens passed through a period of deep depression, which began in 1896 when he received word on a lecture tour in England that his favorite daughter, Susy, had died of meningitis. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/biography_main.php

Facts
His wife’s death in 1904, and the loss of a second daughter in 1909, deepened his gloom. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/biography_main.php

Major Works
The Innocents Abroad (1869) is the story of a cruise to Europe and the Holy Land in 1867. Mark Twain wrote humorous accounts of the trip in letters to newspapers. Later these were brought together into this travel book. The book is insightful, funny, witty and tireless. It satirizes the timeless cultures of such places as Italy and Egypt, and offers insights that remain fresh even today. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
Roughing It (1872) has the recollections of Mark Twain’s life in the West in the 1860s. He lived and worked in Nevada and San Francisco during that time. A large portion of the book covers a trip he made to Hawaii during this time. The narrative is also an
important social history on the mining camps and towns in this part of the country. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
Tom Sawyer (1876) is a story of the Adventures of Tom Sawyer, his friend Huckleberry Finn, and his girlfriend Becky Thatcher in the small Mississippi River town of St. Petersburg, Missouri. The novel is considered autobiographical because the characters and setting were based on Mark Twain’s boyhood experiences. The main plot developed when Tom and Huck witnessed a murder in the cemetery. Tom revealed that the murderer was Injun Joe. Later Tom and Becky were lost in a cave where Injun Joe was hiding. Tom Sawyer is one of Mark Twain’s best loved novels. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
A Tramp Abroad (1880) told of travel by Twain and his family in Europe in the 1870s. The book is humorous, but was not as well received as some of his other creations. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
The Prince and the Pauper (1881) is the story of a prince and a poor boy who switched places. Set in England in the 1500s, this novel is a satire on the social norms and pretensions of the time. The main characters were Edward VI, a boy who was king of England, and Tom Canty. The two were quite similar in appearance. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
Life on the Mississippi (1883) was written as a part of a Mississippi River cruise by Mark Twain and friends in 1882. For background material Twain also had his years as a pilot on the Mississippi in the years before the Civil War. Life on the Mississippi was well received and showed Twain to be more than a humorist. Material gathered for the book led to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which has been considered by many to be Twain’s greatest work. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884) is a story of young Huckleberry Finn and a runaway slave named Jim. They floated down the Mississippi River from Missouri and had numerous adventures. Huckleberry was running from his drunken father and also Widow Douglas who had tried to teach him manners. The story is a social commentary on pre-Civil War life along the Mississippi River valley. It shows the moral choices that face a young boy. During the course of the novel, Jim and Huckleberry slowly grow to respect each other and develop a strong bond of friendship. This is arguably Mark Twain’s best novel, and is considered by some to be the greatest American novel. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court (1889)–The story of a man from Connecticut who travelled back in time to the court of King Arthur in England. The book was an attempt to contrast the harsh living conditions of the poor with the pettiness and snobbery of the aristocrats of that time. The story is humorous and insightful about the human condition. The Connecticut Yankee played the master manipulator. He patronized the foolish knights and knaves while building an empire of technology under their very noses. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
The Diaries of Adam and Eve (1893/1905) Extracts from Adam’s Diary (1893) is a witty and whimsical look at the Biblical creation story and Adam’s adventures as he explores his new world. Twain uses this work as a forum to express his irreverent thoughts on conventional religion. By contrast‚ Eve’s Diary (1905) is Twain’s tribute to his beloved wife‚ Livy. The story from Eve’s viewpoint speaks eloquently of kindness and human goodness – overall‚ a commentary on Livy’s gentle nature. Adam’s last words at Eve’s grave are: “Wheresoever she was‚ there was Eden.” http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
Pudd’nhead Wilson (1894) was the story of a murder trial in Missouri in the 1830s. The work is significant in that it deals with slavery and the damage it causes to the human spirit. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896) Twain said he regarded this work as his best: his version of the story of the Maid of Orleans who‚ in 1429‚ at the age of 17‚ led a French rebellion against English domination. She was tried for witchcraft and heresy by French priests‚ supporters of the English‚ and burned at the stake. Twain viewed Joan of Arc as his bid to be considered a “serious” writer. Joan is considered to be Twain’s ideal woman: gentle‚ selfless and pure‚ but also courageous and eloquent. Twain’s Joan is said to be modeled after his oldest daughter‚ Susy‚ who died tragically three months after Joan of Arc was published. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
Following the Equator (1897) was the record of a lecture tour around the world in the 1890s. Both the lecture tour and book helped to pay debts from business losses by Mark Twain. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Major Works
The Mysterious Stranger (1916) An adult tale set in a medieval European village‚ The Mysterious Stranger tells of some boys who encounter a young stranger who performs wonderful feats of magic and shows the boys different times and places in mankind’s history. The stranger turns out to be a nephew of Satan. In this work‚ not published during his lifetime and not in its entirety for decades after his death‚ Twain explored and explained his feelings about religion and faith‚ good and evil. http://www.marktwainhouse.org/man/major_works.php

Quotes
Anyone who stops learning is old, whether twenty or eighty. Anyone who keeps learning stays young. The greatest thing you can do is keep your mind young. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Quotes
Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Quotes
I have a higher and grander standard of principle than George Washington. He could not lie; I can, but I won’t. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Quotes
Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Quotes
I didn’t attend the funeral, but I sent a nice letter saying that I approved of it. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Quotes
Honesty is the best policy – when there is money in it. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Quotes
Grief can take care of itself; but to get the full value of a joy you must have someone to divide it with. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Quotes
Habit is habit and not to be flung out of the window by any man, but coaxed downstairs a step at a time. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Quotes
Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Quotes
A man cannot be comfortable without his own approval. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Quotes
Always do right. This will gratify some people and astonish the rest. http://www.quotationspage.com/quotes/Mark_Twain/

Plays
Colonel Sellers (five-act), produced in New York City, 1874. http://people.brandeis.edu/~teuber/twainbio.html

Plays
(With Bret Harte) Ah Sin, produced in Washington, DC, 1877. http://people.brandeis.edu/~teuber/twainbio.html

Plays
The Quaker City Holy Land Excursion: An Unfinished Play, Buttonmaker Press (Omaha), 1986. http://people.brandeis.edu/~teuber/twainbio.html

Facts
Twain was a naturalist and greatly enjoyed nature’s beauty. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Mark Twain lived in Hartford, Connecticut for 20+ years and lived in Redding, Connecticut for 2 years. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Redding is where he died on April 21st 1910. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Twain was an inventor and held several patents. An adjustable garment strap & a history memorization game are examples. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
His most successful invention was a scrap book. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Twain was a founding member of The Players club in New York City. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
In 1917, Emily Grant Hutchins published a book “Jap Herron,” that she claimed Mark Twain had written from the grave via a Ouija board. “after several messages had been spelled out the pointer of the planchette traced the words ‘Samuel M. [sic] Clemens, Lazy Sam,’ “and the story as printed was then told.” http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Twain’s Short Story “A Curious Experience” begins: “This is the story which the Major told me, as nearly as I can recall it:– In the winter of 1862-3, I was commandant of Fort Trumbull, at New London, Conn.” There is now an exhibit at Fort Trumbull where you can sit and hear this story. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

Facts
Before he began his 1895/96 World Tour Mark Twain was deep in debt. http://www.life123.com/arts-culture/american-authors/mark-twain/interesting-facts-about-mark-twain.shtml

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