Essays on The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates
Original title The Lincoln-Douglas Debates
Author

Abraham Lincoln

Genre Historical Fiction
Language English
Characters Abraham Lincoln, Mary Todd Lincoln, William Wallace Lincoln, Robert Todd Lincoln, Edward Baker Lincoln, Thomas Lincoln, Nancy Lincoln, Sarah Lincoln, John Wilkes Booth, Edwin Stanton ...
Published March 2, 2010
ISBN 978-0-8032-1787-0
Book Summary
Essay Examples

Table of Contents

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates Book summary

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican candidate for the Senate from Illinois, and Stephen A. Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate for the Senate from Illinois. They took place in the summer and fall of 1858, mostly in Illinois, and followed a pattern: each candidate spoke for an hour, followed by a half-hour rebuttal. The debates were widely publicized in the newspapers of the day and attracted a large audience. The main topics discussed were slavery and states’ rights. Lincoln argued that slavery was morally wrong and should be ended, while Douglas argued that each state should be allowed to decide for itself whether to allow slavery. The debates had a major impact on the election, and Lincoln’s performance in them helped him to win the Republican nomination for President in 1860.

The Lincoln Douglas Debates: A brief overview

The Lincoln–Douglas debates were a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican candidate for the United States Senate from Illinois, and incumbent Senator Stephen Douglas, the Democratic Party candidate. They took place in the towns of Ottawa, Freeport, Jonesboro, Charleston, Galesburg, Quincy, and Alton in Illinois, and were sponsored by the Illinois Republican Party. The debates previewed the issues that Lincoln would face in the 1860 presidential election.Lincoln and Douglas were both former Whigs who had switched to the new Republican Party in the 1850s. They differed on many issues, including slavery and states’ rights. While Lincoln had long been an opponent of slavery, Douglas argued that each state had the right to decide whether or not to allow slavery within its borders.The debates took place during a highly contentious election campaign. Illinois was a key battleground state, and the outcome of the election was seen as critical to the future of the nation. In the end, Lincoln lost the election, but the debates helped to raise his profile nationally and set the stage for his victory in the 1860 presidential election.

The First Debate: August 21, 1858 in Ottawa, Illinois

The first debate between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas was held on August 21, 1858 in Ottawa, Illinois. This was the first of seven debates between the two men during the 1858 Illinois Senate election.The debate lasted for three hours and covered a wide range of topics, including slavery, the Dred Scott decision, popular sovereignty, and the role of the federal government. Lincoln argued that slavery was a moral wrong and that the government should take steps to ban it. Douglas argued that slavery was a state issue and that the federal government shouldn’t get involved.The debate was widely reported in the newspapers and helped to raise Lincoln’s profile nationally. He would go on to win the election and become one of the most important figures in American history.

The Second Debate: October 7, 1858 in Freeport, Illinois

The second debate between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas took place on October 7, 1858 in Freeport, Illinois. This debate is considered one of the most important in American history as it helped to shape the country’s future.The debate revolved around the issue of slavery and its expansion into new territories. Lincoln argued that slavery was morally wrong and that it should not be allowed to expand into new areas. Douglas, on the other hand, argued that the people of each territory should be allowed to decide for themselves whether or not to allow slavery.The debate was held in front of a large crowd of people and was widely reported in the newspapers. Lincoln’s arguments against slavery and for the equality of all men helped to make him a national figure and paved the way for his election as President of the United States in 1860.

The Third Debate: November 21, 1858 in Jonesboro, Illinois

The Third Debate: November 21, 1858 in Jonesboro, Illinois was the last of a series of seven debates between Abraham Lincoln, the Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate from Illinois, and Stephen A. Douglas, the Democratic incumbent. The debates were held in seven Illinois towns over a period of three months. Jonesboro was the only town in which the debate was held on a Saturday, and the only one in which a large crowd was in attendance.Lincoln began the debate by stating that the issue at hand was whether the nation could “continue half slave and half free.” He argued that the nation could not, and that slavery must eventually come to an end. Douglas countered by arguing that the issue was one of states’ rights, and that each state should be allowed to decide whether or not to allow slavery.The debate lasted for three hours, and at the end, both Lincoln and Douglas agreed that it had been a fair and honest exchange of views.

The Final Debate: April 15, 1865 in Washington, D.C

The final debate of the American Civil War took place on April 15, 1865 in Washington, D.C. The debate was between the two main political leaders of the time: Abraham Lincoln, the President of the United States, and Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederate States of America.The debate was moderated by Horace Greeley, the editor of the New York Tribune. Greeley was a strong supporter of Lincoln and the Union cause.The debate was very civil. Both Lincoln and Davis made their case for why their respective side should win the war. Lincoln argued that the Union was fighting for the principles of democracy and liberty, while Davis argued that the Confederacy was fighting for the right of self-determination.In the end, Lincoln won the debate. He made a strong case for the Union and its cause. His argument was more convincing than Davis’s.The debate was important because it showed that the Union was still a strong political force, even though the Confederacy was crumbling. The debate also showed that Lincoln was a great political leader. He was able to effectively argue for the Union cause even in the face of defeat.

Conclusion

of 1858 by Paul SimonThe Lincoln-Douglas Debates of 1858 is an important book for anyone interested in American history. The book provides a detailed account of the seven debates between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas during the 1858 Illinois Senate campaign. Simon does an excellent job of placing the debates in their historical context and providing readers with a clear understanding of the issues at stake in the election. The book is also well-written and easy to read. I would recommend it to anyone interested in learning more about the Lincoln-Douglas debates or the election of 1858.

We've found 3 essay samples about The Lincoln-Douglas Debates
Prev
1 of 1
Next