Growth Mindset Essay

Custom Student Mr. Teacher ENG 1001-04 30 May 2016

Growth Mindset

Asking Effective Questions

Problem Solving Approach in mathematics classroom because it engages student in inquiry, prompting them to build on and improve their current knowledge as they “construct” explanations and help them solve tasks at hand. In a “Constructivist classroom” students are seen as the ones who are actively creating their own knowledge”. This is done through questioning to h

I need respect, motivation, encouragement, determination, to have confidence in your students.

8 Tips for Effective Questioning

1. Anticipate Student Thinking (plan the possible questions to stimulate thinking and deepen student understanding

2. Link to Learning Goals

3. Pose open ended questions 0 help build students’ self-confidence, help them respond at their own stage of development and allow for differentiation

Invitational stems that use plural forms and exploratory language invite reflection. Huinker and Freckman (2004, p. 256) suggest the following examples: As you think about… Given what you know about… In regard to the decisions you made… From previous work with students… When you think about..As you consider… In what ways… In your planning… Take a minute.

4. Pose Questions that actually need to be answered

5. Incorporate verbs that elicit higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs such as connect, elaborate, evaluate and justify prompt students to communi- cate their thinking and understanding, to deepen their understanding and to extend their learning. Huinker and Freckman (2004, p. 256) provide a list of verbs that elicit specific cognitive processes to engage thinking: observe notice remember contrast interpret

evaluate summarize visualize (“see”) differ distinguish
decide identify compare predict explain
conclude infer relate consider describe

6. Pose Questions that Open up conversations to include others.

7. Keep Questions Neutral

8. Provide Wait Time (use strategies such as turn and talk, think-pair-share and round robin to give students time to articulate and clarify their thinking

Ms Hastings does use different Instructional Strategies. She builds strong relationships with her students, set high expectations for performance and has a good understanding of their needs to reach success in her classroom.

Ms Hastings first has a strong belief in the “Growth Mindset” by setting high expectations and showing student they can learn as opposed to the belief of “either you are good at math or not”. Teacher shows students how they can succeed and achieve through “application and experience”. Their words and actions make it clear that the past does not dictate the future. If a teacher promotes the “growth mind-set”, they can focus students on “self-development, self-motivation and responsibility” and help them develop the mental determination to continue to improve. She clearly sets objectives and provides feedback to her students to help them progress. By reinforcing effort and providing recognition, students believe they can succeed. These strategies all provide students with the belief that they can positively affect their learning

She also uses various strategies to promote thinking and learning in the classroom. She uses cooperative learning, uses effective questioning and graphic organizers. She uses team building exercises and forms a base group, in which they learn and work together for the semester.

In reading the Capacity Building Monograph in “Asking Effective Questions in Mathematics” in showed how you can change Learning to becoming something you get for a short time to permananence and building a deeper understanding. In Ms. Hastings class, the 8 tips provided in this monograph are great strategies being used in Ms. Hastings class. One of the most important influences in student achievement is the relationship between teacher and students (Hattlie, 2009). By Ms. Hastings telling success stories this provides encouragement to her students.

Ms. Hastings class is preparing her students with the skills of the “21st Century Learner”. She is doing this by helping her students set personal learning goals, self-assessment for understanding, therefore, making learning permanent, accessing tools and resources for enhancing their understanding and using their learning in rich meaningful tasks in real-world contexts. These students will learn problem-solving, critical thinking and using their prior knowledge and skills to apply them to new situations.

Two challenges faced by adolescents is the belief they are not good at math, therefore, find it challenging and are less engaged in math class. The second challenge is to make math learning become permanent through student engagement. This means using Instructional Strategies to ensure students are engaged in their own learning and self-assessment.

One of the challenges faced by adolescents is the belief they are “not good at math”. This may be imparted by their parents belief they were not good at mathematics and do not ask more from their children. There needs to be a shift from this belief from all adults involved. They must recognize and affirm the importance of mathematical literacy for all. In the Ministry’s Numeracy Report (2004), students need the “ability to deal with the fundamental notions of number and change in order to make sense of mathematical information presented in everyday contexts” (Paulos, 1988, pg.). Mathematical literacy in important for both employment and post-secondary admissions. Therefore, as teachers, we need to take advantage of the abundant opportunities for fostering mathematical literacy across the curriculum. As with Ms. Hastings, has a strong belief in the “Growth Mindset” by setting high expectations and showing student they can learn as opposed to the belief of “either you are good at math or not”.

Teacher shows students how they can succeed and achieve through “application and experience”. Their words and actions make it clear that the past does not dictate the future. If a teacher promotes the “growth mind-set”, they can focus students on “self-development, self-motivation and responsibility” and help them develop the mental determination to continue to improve. She clearly sets objectives and provides feedback to her students to help them progress. By reinforcing effort and providing recognition, students believe they can succeed. These strategies all provide students with the belief that they can positively affect their learning

She also uses various strategies to promote thinking and learning in the classroom. She uses cooperative learning, uses effective questioning and graphic organizers. She uses teambuilding exercises and forms a base group, in which they learn and work together for the semester.

The second challenge faced by adolescent if to ensure their learning has “permanence”. This is done through strong conceptual foundations in math and ample opportunities for students to demonstrate their knowledge. I also believe that as teachers we need to use effective instructional strategies to emphasize student ability to think, use problem-solving skills and build on prior knowledge. Ms. Hastings uses various strategies to promote thinking and learning in the classroom. She uses cooperative learning, uses effective questioning and graphic organizers. She uses team building exercises and forms a base group, in which they learn and work together for the semester.

In reading the Capacity Building Monograph in “Asking Effective Questions in Mathematics” in showed how you can change Learning to becoming something you get for a short time to permanence and building a deeper understanding. In Ms. Hastings class, the 8 tips provided in this monograph are great strategies being used in Ms. Hastings class. One of the most important influences in student achievement is the relationship between teacher and students (Hattlie, 2009). By Ms. Hastings telling success stories this provides encouragement to her students.

Ms. Hastings class is preparing her students with the skills of the “21st Century Learner”. She is doing this by helping her students set personal learning goals, self-assessment for understanding, therefore, making learning permanent, accessing tools and resources for enhancing their understanding and using their learning in rich meaningful tasks in real-world contexts. These students will learn problem-solving, critical thinking and using their prior knowledge and skills to apply them to new situations. To be able to prepare our students as 21st Century Learners, we need to increase our math competence through professional learning to be more effective.

The Expert Panels Report on Student Success in Ontario Mathematical Literacy, Grades 7-12 (May 2004) looked at at-risk mathematical learners and came up with a number of themes:

Effective teaching and learning begins with the needs to the adolescent learners and have a good understanding of their development stages Connect the learning in math to the lives of the students (having rich meaningful tasks that connect to real-life contexts) Ensuring they have a strong conceptual foundations to be able to apply their knowledge and continue their learning Instructional learning strategies empahisize problem solving and building and one’s own understandings To improve students’ performance, teachers need to link instruction more closely to assessment

More professional learning opportunities for teachers to strengthen their competence in math Technology to support learning and have more accessibility to students who are struggling in math Also extra support for “at risk” students to close the gap Strong leadership and strong planning to create an effective learning environment in which all the needs of the students are met and success is promoted.

2. Changing Climate – Transforming Classroom Culture Dan Myer Inquiry Based Learning
Being interest in students thinking
How my teachers see them in a sincere way and shed the idea of controlling the process Bring the student who are not strong in the foundations
Gains in achievement – multimedia helped students who are identified at risk or LD Teach as we are taught, memorization, calculations, learning formulas, doing math and debrief

M.J. Hobbs Senior P.S. –DI 7-8
Differentiated Instruction and problem solving by group readiness Individual Accountability in group work
Create a positive work environment
Group work looks like, sounds like anchor charts with clear understanding of expectations Participate in work that is engaging and challenging

Centennial S.S. HPEDSB Differentiating Instruction Secondary Think-Pair-Share
Mathematical Questions
Justify using mathematical vocabulary
Learning Centres give students choice, work collaboratively and related to hands on materials and manipulatives’ based on their strengths (observe the kids first to see how they are learning Use the entry point depending on their strengths and how they learn to work towards the curriculum expectations Use of different strategies and connect using different means to demonstrate their learning Data given for Problem Solving

Exit cards to demonstrate learning in a differentiated environment to take responsibility on teaching the students how they learn DI planning for kids based on grouping on kids strengths and needs.

Free Growth Mindset Essay Sample

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  • University/College: University of Arkansas System

  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Date: 30 May 2016

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