End of the novel Essay

Custom Student Mr. Teacher ENG 1001-04 10 November 2017

End of the novel

This is similar to Victor’s pursuit for glory, as both men (Victor and Walton) are putting the life of themselves and other men in danger by continuing to try and achieve their ambition. From Victor’s above words we can see that he is still motivated to seek revenge on the monster, despite the danger to his life. He also attempts to put the life of others in danger, as he asks Walton to murder the monster if he gets a chance: If I do (die), swear to me, Walton, that (the monster) shall not escape; that you seek him, and satisfy my vengeance in his death. (Volume 3, Chapter 7, p212)

When Victor enters the novel, he is portrayed as a noble and kind person who is capable of both love and friendship. He has strong ambition and eager to learn. However, one gets the impression that when he starts to create life, he is trying to take the role of God, and becomes obsessed with gaining glory and power so much, that he forgets the importance of love and family. Victor also fails to care for the monster, which in my opinion is highly monstrous as it just like abandoning a new born baby.

Furthermore, Victor acts selfishly in many occasions throughout the play. He decides to create a female companion for the monster, to stop the monster chasing him. But he goes against his promise when he thinks about what the world will think of him, if a “race of monsters” attacks the world. Everything Victor does is centred on himself and he only thinks about what benefit it would be to himself, when he considers an action.

Now that I have considered Victor as a character, I will now examine the monster. The monster starts off his life as an innocent creature; however his abnormal figure and demented shape caused people to be scared of him and reject him. When the monster walked into an old man’s home to “obtain food and shelter”, the old man: -turned on hearing a noise; and, perceiving (the monster), shrieked loudly, and, quitting the hut, ran across the fields. (Volume 2, Chapter 3, p108)

All the man had to see was monsters figure to make him run away without any enquiry. This suggests that the creature’s look posed a threat to everyone who saw him, and led to him being alienated from society. However the monster is quite kind to start off with. While he was observing the De Lacy family, he demonstrates his kind gestures by gathering “a great pile of wood” for the De Lacy family to use as firewood. He also put their well being before his starvation, as he stopped stealing “a part of their store for (his) own consumption” when he found out that it “inflicted pain on the cottagers”.

During the beginning period the monster spends with the De Lacy family, he “perceives that the words they spoke sometimes produced pleasure or pain, smiles or sadness, in the minds and countenances of the hearers”. He too wanted to be able to interact in this way and “ardently desired to become acquainted” with speech. This shows that the monster is eager to learn and wants to become just like other humans.

Once the monster has mastered the use of speech, his desire to be like humans motivated him to enter the house of the De Lacy family, and speak to the blind old man when he was “left alone at the cottage”. This shows that the monster has some wit and cleverness as he selects a person who can’t judge him by his figure, but his personality and speech. However, whilst he is talking to the blind old man, the rest of the De Lacy family return home and were shocked by the appearance of the monster to such an extent that Felix, a male member of the De Lacy family, beat the monster “violently with a stick” using “supernatural force”.

It is this mistreatment of the monster that sparks a deadly hatred within himself for his creator. The monster had received abuse from the De Lacy family after he had helped them, all because of the way that Victor had made him look, and the fact that he had failed to protect him. It is this anger that makes the monster monstrous by personality and drives him to kill William (Victor’s younger brother): “‘Frankenstein! You belong then to my enemy–to him towards whom I have sworn eternal revenge; you shall be my first victim.’ (Volume 2, Chapter 8, p144)

The monster also seems to be jealous of Victor, as he knows that he can never have love and relationship like him and other humans because of the way he looks. We know this because the monster frames Justine for murder of William, as he knew he could never possess anything as beautiful as her. And it is this feeling that brings the monster to demand Victor to make “a creature of another sex, but as hideous as” himself. From this, we can see all that the monster wants is a bit of love and companionship, to make him lead a life which is similar to humans.

However Victor cheats the monster by first agreeing to create the female monster, but then “tearing (her) to pieces” in front the monster at the final stages of her production. This upsets the monster as Victor has effectively destroyed the monster’s only chance of love in front of his eyes. This antagonism caused the monster to become monstrous once again, as he murders both Henry Clerval and Elizabeth (now Victor’s wife):

-what I now held in my arms had ceased to be the Elizabeth whom I had loved and cherished. The murderous mark of the fiend’s grasp was on her neck, and the breath had ceased to issue from her lips. (Volume 3, Chapter 6, p199) Despite this, the monster does illustrate some humane characteristics towards the end of the novel. He presents great grievance for the death of Victor, and heartfelt remorse for his malicious actions: Oh, Frankenstein! generous and self-devoted being! What does it avail that I now ask thee to pardon me? I, who irretrievably destroyed thee by destroying all thou lovedst.

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  • Type of paper: Thesis/Dissertation Chapter

  • Date: 10 November 2017

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