De Profundis by Oscar Wilde

First Person Pronoun
A pronoun to show that an account is the authors own experience (e.g. “I want to get to the point…”)

Juxtaposition
Two things that usually should not go together (e.g. “Oxford…prison”)
Juxtaposition

Repetition
When something is said again either next to or close to the first instance. When something is said again either next to or close to the first instance. When something is said again either next to or close to the first instance.

Modal Auxiliary Verb
A verb used to show certainty (e.g. “I shall say quite simply”)

Antithesis
Balance in a sentence (e.g. “When my father sent me to Oxford and society sent me to prison”)
Antithesis

Sensual Language
Language used to create emotion and a feeling of actually being there (e.g. “the pageant of the seasons”)

Simple Sentences
A sentence with a single clause including a subject (e.g. “It was ruinous advice”)

Semantic Field
The general feel of the language used (e.g. a feeling of wonder”)

Metaphor
Language used to describe something by saying that it is literally something else (e.g. “or they will lose their healing power”)

Triadic Structure
Use of a list of three to make a point (e.g. ” maimed, marred, and incomplete”)
Triadic Structure

Alliteration
The use of words that begin with the same letter adjacent to one another (e.g. “maimed, marred…”)

De Profundis
Latin for “From the Depths” suggests that he is writing from “the depth of his heart” could suggest his love for the intended recipient?

Collocations
Words that are linked together through repeated use (e.g. “sun and moon”)
Collocations

Climax
The most important and impactful part of a text, often at the end (e.g. “It is no less than a denial of the soul”)

Oxymoron
Things that don’t make sense together (e.g. “make the evil things of my life good”)

Retrospective Narration
Something being looked back upon (e.g. “When first I was put into prison…”)

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