Compare the creation scene in Boris Karloff’s Essay

Custom Student Mr. Teacher ENG 1001-04 12 November 2017

Compare the creation scene in Boris Karloff’s

Genre benefits the film industry because it classifies/categorises the type of film which the film industry are required to make. It benefits the audience because they are usually expecting the genre of film and this will result in fewer complaints from the audiences, as they are prepared for the viewing. I have seen several films belonging to the Horror genre. E. g. The Haunting, Scream 1, 2 and 3, The Exorcist, The Poltergeist.

Horror films deal with our most primal nature and its fears: Nightmares, our Vulnerability, our Alienation and our Terror of the Unknown, Death, and Para normality, Monsters, Blood and Religion are typical elements that make up a horror film. The scene selected is the creation scene. At this point in the narrative, Victor brings the monster to life. The 1931 version of the film is set in a stereotypical “Mad Scientists” laboratory with all the high-Tec equipment, potions and machinery. It looks like it is set in the cellar of a gothic mansion or castle. The laboratory appears to be tense and top secret.

No music is used throughout the scene. Victor Frankenstein wears traditional doctors white robes which is also a stereotypical feature. It links with the surroundings/environment because the doctors’ robes convey a sense of technicality/experimentalism. The spectators in the scene are wearing formal clothing; they would have been “well off” in those days. The use of dialogue contrasts with most Horror films as quite a lot is said. Most of the dialogue spoken by doctor Frankenstein regards scientific explanation. Thunder, Lightning, and the electric buzzes are the only sound effects used.

They can be classed as scientific sounds. The thunder and lightning are to do with nature and also the supernatural as they can be seen as horrific. Thunder and lightning are stereotypical elements of a horror film. Infrequent thunder sounds are heard, this creates tension for the viewer. The lightning usually strikes when movement or raising of voice occurs. The majority of the cuts are very fast apart from when the table with the monster on is being elevated. This shot is one of the main focusing points throughout the scene and Boris Karloff has shown this by making it the longest shot in the scene.

It is also one of the few low angle shots throughout the scene making this an outstanding shot. Every shot in the scene is a straight cut. The fast cuts convey a sense of urgency and tension. No special effects are used in the scene. Very few low angle shots are used compared to the amount of high angle shots used. The low angle shots sometimes show power and authority, for example when Victor Frankenstein is talking to the other doctor. He contradicts the other doctor and proves him wrong; this shows his authority over him.

This degrades the doctor in front of the on-scene audience. Igor (Frankenstein’s assistant) is a typical aspect of Horror. He is an iconography to “The Hunchback Of Notredame” which relates to horror. The camera rarely moves. It is usually still. Doctor Frankenstein is shown to look evil and greedy whereas the monster is shown to look helpless and weak as the movement of its hand is very low. The camera never zooms in throughout the scene. The 1993 version of the film by Kenneth Branagh uses lots of loud, tense music with a fast beat at the start of the scene.

This creates a sense of urgency at the start of the scene. As Victor Frankenstein is running, this also adds the tension. Victor Frankenstein is wearing very scruffy clothes. The scene is set in a Gothic type castle/mansion and it looks like it is set in the medieval times by the use of props. Lots of candles also add to the medieval setting. However, lots of machinery and electrical devices are seen which contrasts with the medieval setting. In this scene, Dr Frankenstein brings the monster to life and tries helping it to stand up when he kills it unintentionally.

Very few words are said throughout the scene which are the typical aspects of a Horror film but, as there is only one human viewed throughout the scene it is quite obvious that not a lot of dialogue is expected. Each shot is very short and has a straight cut. The only special effects are used at the monster’s birth where it squeezes out of its cage. There are lots of close-ups and medium shots on Victor. You are given the impression that the monster is weak and feeble. Frankenstein gives the impression of being a very unlucky and distraught person as the monster dies.

Both films fit in the category of Horror, however Kenneth Branagh’s version is much more like a Horror film to me as it includes action and excitement. Kenneth Branagh’s version was a big budget film whereas the 1931 version was not. It also includes music and special effects whereas the 1931 version does not. This is why Kenneth Branagh’s version is my favourite. By Jack Sanders 10F Show preview only The above preview is unformatted text This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Mary Shelley section.

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