Boiling point of water Essay

Custom Student Mr. Teacher ENG 1001-04 5 June 2017

Boiling point of water

Over time, numerous applications for the addition of salt in water have been established and the process of adding salt in water has become a regular exercise wherever water has to be boiled around the world (Bradley, 2006). Purpose The purpose of this project is to study the implications of the addition of salt in the reaction of water to heat. Theory & Hypothesis Upon the addition of common salt (NaCl) in distilled water, it causes the boiling point of the water to rise. As a result, water has to be heated for longer intervals of time as the amount of salt in the water is increased.

The hypothesis of this study is to validate whether or not the addition of salt in water causes the boiling point of the water to rise. Apparatus used The apparatus that was used for this experiment comprised of table Salt (NaCl), distilled Water, measuring spoon, stirring spoon, thermometer, electric stove, kettle. Experimental procedure implemented In the first step, the kettle is filled with distilled water and is placed on the electric stove. It was filled with approximately two teacups of water. It is allowed to boil continuously and the thermometer was used to measure the temperature of the water after every few minutes.

The water was observed to begin boiling at approximately 213 °F in normal conditions when no additions had been made to the water. In the second step, the initial sample of water was allowed to cool down until it had returned to room temperature, after which one leveled measuring spoonful of salt was added to the water and the kettle was once more placed on the electric stove to boil. The salt had been mixed into the water using the stirring spoon before it was put to boil. The water was once more allowed to boil continuously and the thermometer was used to measure the temperature of the water after every few minutes.

The water was observed to begin boiling at a higher temperature than 213 °F after salt had been added to the water. In the third step, the water was once more allowed to cool down until it had returned back to room temperature. Once the water had returned to room temperature, a second addition of salt (NaCl) is made. The measuring spoon was used to add another leveled spoonful of salt to the water and was stirred thoroughly using the stirring spoon. The kettle was then placed on the stove once more and was allowed to begin heating up.

The water was once more allowed to boil continuously and the thermometer was used to measure the temperature of the water after every few minutes. The water was observed to begin boiling at a higher temperature than that which had been observed in the readings taken in step two of the experiment. At all times, special care was taken to ensure that the thermometer did not touch the walls or the base of the kettle and that it was not held above the stove for too lon.g in order to prevent the readings from being altered unintentionally. Observations recorded.

The readings that were recorded during the three phases of the experiment can be observed in the following table. Phase Phase Attributes Boiling Point Observed 1 Boiling point for control sample 212. 9 °F 2 Boiling point after first addition of salt 215. 6 °F 3 Boiling point after second addition of salt 218. 3 °F Table 1: Observations made during the experiment If a bar chart was to be made of the three stages of the experiment that were taken during the experiment. We would have the following bar chart at hand. Chart 1: Comparison of observations made during the execution of the experiment Conclusions.

From the above experiment, we can conclude that when common salt (NaCl) is added to water, it causes the boiling point of the water to increase. As the amount of salt in the water was increased, a proportional increase was also observed in the temperature that the water required to attain its boiling point. The increase in boiling point was therefore established to be directly proportional to the amount of salt in the water. This also explained the fact that before any salt was added to the water, the water boiled at its standard temperature. We can therefore state that the hypothesis of this experiment stands valid.

This would also explain why everyday uses of salt in water such as those recommended in the culinary arts perceive the addition of salt in water (McGee, 1984) as a necessity to ensure that the end result is prepared to perfection through continuous heating.

References Bradley, D. (2006, December 27). Salt and the Boiling Point of Water. Retrieved April 27, 2009, from Science Base: http://www. sciencebase. com/science-blog/how-does-salt-affect-the-boiling-point-of-water. html McGee, H. (1984). On food and cooking: the science and lore of the kitchen. Scribner’s. List of Tables Table 1: Observations made during the experiment.

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