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Battle of Passchendaele Essay

On November 6th, 1917 our Canadian soldiers captured the Passchendaele ridge. They had to face many obstacles but they made it.

Canadians take Passchendaele successfully.
On November 6th, 1917 our Canadian soldiers captured the Passchendaele ridge. They had to face many obstacles but they made it.

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Canadian Wounded at the Battle of Passchendaele

More than 15,000 Canadians died or were wounded during the Battle of Passchendaele. Many of them drowned in the mud and shell holes.

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Canadian Wounded at the Battle of Passchendaele

More than 15,000 Canadians died or were wounded during the Battle of Passchendaele. Many of them drowned in the mud and shell holes. The mud, flat terrain, and relative lack of preparation time and artillery support would make Passchendaele a far different battlefield than the one the Canadians encountered at Vimy Ridge.

Currie took the time to carefully prepare as much as possible and on October 26, the Canadian offensive began. Advancing through the mud and enemy fire was slow and there were heavy losses. Despite the challenges, the Canadians reached the outskirts of Passchendaele by the end of a second attack on October 30 during a rainstorm.

On November 6, the Canadians and British launched the assault to capture the village of Passchendaele itself. In excessive fighting, the attack went according to plan. After fierce enemy counterattacks, the last part of the battle saw the Canadians attack on November 10 and take out the Germans from the eastern edge of Passchendaele Ridge.

Our Canadian soldiers won the Battle of Passchendaele. They faced many challenges and obstacles but they fought through and succeeded.

The mud, flat terrain, and relative lack of preparation time and artillery support would make Passchendaele a far different battlefield than the one the Canadians encountered at Vimy Ridge.  Currie took the time to carefully prepare as much as possible and on October 26, the Canadian offensive began. Advancing through the mud and enemy fire was slow and there were heavy losses. Despite the challenges, the Canadians reached the outskirts of Passchendaele by the end of a second attack on October 30 during a rainstorm.

On November 6, the Canadians and British launched the assault to capture the village of Passchendaele itself. In excessive fighting, the attack went according to plan. After fierce enemy counterattacks, the last part of the battle saw the Canadians attack on November 10 and take out the Germans from the eastern edge of Passchendaele Ridge.

Our Canadian soldiers won the Battle of Passchendaele. They faced many challenges and obstacles but they fought through and succeeded.

The Canadian plan in capturing Passchendaele was simple: they would attack in a series of battles, each with a small objective. Step by step, they would take the village, the overall objective being to secure a defensible position on the Passchendaele Ridge. If they succeeded, they would make a small gap in German positions, leaving them exposed to enemy fire from all directions.

Before the Canadian entered the battle on the Passchendaele Ridge, the British and Australian soldiers had fought there for more than three months. They were defeated with 100,000 casualties.  Our Canadian Commander Sir Arthur Currie had begged the Commander-in-Chief to spare the Canadians the ordeal of Passchendaele, his plea had been refused because pressure on the enemy must be maintained.

The Ypres Salient was in utter disarray. The continuous damaged that had been caused to it destroyed the drainage system. The heavy rains that lasted for days had the terrain turn into an oozing quagmire of yellow mud. It was impossible to dig trenches. Men would be swallowed and killed in that mud.

The Canadian plan in capturing Passchendaele was simple: they would attack in a series of battles, each with a small objective. Step by step, they would take the village, the overall objective being to secure a defensible position on the Passchendaele Ridge. If they succeeded, they would make a small gap in German positions, leaving them exposed to enemy fire from all directions.

Before the Canadian entered the battle on the Passchendaele Ridge, the British and Australian soldiers had fought there for more than three months. They were defeated with 100,000 casualties.  Our Canadian Commander Sir Arthur Currie had begged the Commander-in-Chief to spare the Canadians the ordeal of Passchendaele, his plea had been refused because pressure on the enemy must be maintained.

The Ypres Salient was in utter disarray. The continuous damaged that had been caused to it destroyed the drainage system. The heavy rains that lasted for days had the terrain turn into an oozing quagmire of yellow mud. It was impossible to dig trenches. Men would be swallowed and killed in that mud.

General Sir Arthur Currie
Quote:
“I am a good enough Canadian to believe, if my experience justifies me in believing, that Canadians are best served by Canadians.” General Sir Arthur Currie
Quote:
“I am a good enough Canadian to believe, if my experience justifies me in believing, that Canadians are best served by Canadians.”

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