A Comparison of the Similarities and Differences Between Organ Sales Will Save Lives by MacKay and Selling Organs for Transplantation by Burrows

Categories: Organ Transplant

In the literacy world there are many different ideas being expressed through writing. Some may be completely different and some could be very similar. “Organ Sales Will Save lives”, by Joanna MacKay and “Selling Organs for Transplantation” by Lewis Burrows have a strong relationship with each other. Both articles involve the discussion of organ sales and their opinions on why it could be a suitable change in the medical field.

Organ Sales Will Save Lives is a very determined article, with vigorous statistics and information provided.

It shows the readers the conditions patients are in today while they are on a list of people to get an organ donated. With 2,583 Americans dying from end-stage renal disease while waiting for a donor in just the year of 2000, and 50,000 people worldwide, many have moved onto the next big thing. A reason why people are more interested in a living donor is because of the life expectancy of the organs. A kidney from a living person can last over twice as long as one from a cadaver because the cadaverous kidneys are often old, or not completely healthy and only estimated to function for about ten years.

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Told by MacKay, “An organ from a cadaver will most likely be old, or damaged, estimated to function for about 10 years at most. A kidney from a living donor can last over twice as long” (120).

In current transplants, patients have to wait for people to decease in order to get their kidney, with the exception of a close family member or sibling.

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As shown on page 120, “when no family member is a suitable candidate for donation, the patient is placed on a deceased donor list, relying on the organs from people dying of old age or accidents” (MacKay). With the purchase of one, the patient would get it as soon as an appointment is set up to do so. In a legal kidney transplant the donors do not benefit from the procedure technically. It is argued in this article that if the donors were given a compensation for donating, there would be a great increase in how many organs were being donated. As stated in The Norton Field Guide to Writing, “If the sale of organs were allowed, people would have a greater incentive to help save the life of a stranger” (122 MacKay). In Organ Sales Will Save Lives, the resolution to the black market selling, and to patients who have high hopes of getting the good news is to legalize the selling of organs and regulate it. By regulating the subject closely, we could ensure that the seller is getting a fair amount of compensation. As stated on page 122, “Regulation would ensure that the seller is fairly compensated” as well as protecting the buyers. Also shown on page 123 is, “Regulation would also protect the buyers”, (MacKay). The buyers would no longer have to have secrecy within this matter which would lead to less risks and a safe procedure promised. It is believed that citizens of third world countries would be the biggest sellers. Some may say that we are denoting those people but the article argues that we will not be. We could fully educate them on the risks involving the procedure, as well as compensate them with enough that could go a long way. MacKay states in her article “Under a regulated system, education would be incorporated into the application processes. Before deciding to donate a kidney, the seller should know the details of the operation and any hazards involved” (122).

The idea believed within this article is that if we could do something to help the patients who wait over years to get an organ why wouldn’t we? Selling Organs for Transplantation expresses almost identical thoughts on the subject. Lewis states that although transplantations are highly successful procedures, the availability of the organs are limited. As stated by Burrows, “These successes have led nearly 80,000 individuals to opt as transplantation as a form of therapy.

Unfortunately, the number of organs available, has lagged far behind the demands” (The Selling of Organs for Transplantations, 1). A few countries that are within the “presumed consent” doctrine have a higher availability of organs. As stated in The Selling of Organs for Transplantations, “Countries that have adopted the doctrine of “presumed consent” have a much higher rate of organ recovery” (Burrows, 1). What is the difference? With presumed consent, organs are automatically enrolled into the recovery of their organs when they pass away, unless they decide to opt-out of it, unlike in most countries, one has to opt into the recovery. Lewis’s proposition is that if selling of organs was legalized, they would not just offer anyone to be available. He believes that the sellers should be specifically selected and matched to the patients. As stated by Burrows, “I want to consider the situation where the donor and the recipient are carefully matched…” (Selling Organs for Transplantations, 2). Another sure product would be that the sellers are guaranteed adequate care after the procedure and lifetime insurance for themselves and their families. As said by Burrows on page 4, “Paid donors must be guaranteed long-term medical care and life insurance for themselves and their families in the event that complications occur” (Selling Organs for Transplantations). There are several occurrences that Burrows would not accept with the process, but there are also many positive situations that he believes overrides the negative. Burrows said on page 3, “I would like to summarize the conditions that incline me to accept payment to organ donors in the ideal situation” (Selling Organs for Transplantations). As he went through every possibility Lewis in fact did have a change of direction. He realized that the current system had many flaws and that for now, buying donors is a way to keep his patients from dying. As shown on page 4, “But for the time being, while my patients are dying for want of an organ, I have accepted this libertarian and utilitarian approach” (Burrows, Selling Organs for Transplantations).

The purpose of Organ Sales Will Save Lives is to inform the readers about organ selling and argue the reasons of how it can help in the medical industry. The article gives in depth detail and evidence to prove to the audience that they are valid points. For this piece of writing the audience intended from my take of it would be all patients that need transplantations and their families, doctors, and all adults. I think this because everyday adults will be who are donating, and if doctors are persuaded than maybe the hospital directors will listen to them. As I have mentioned earlier that it persuades, informs, and argues, the technical genre for this piece of writing is only argumentative. The stance the author holds is that organ selling should be legalized.

The Purpose of Selling Organs for Transplantations is for Lewis Burrows to explain his thoughts on and opinions on selling organs. He wasn’t trying to convince the readers to go in any certain way, he was just assigned to write an article on what he feels about it. The audience for his article I believe is other professionals in the medical field, and adults interested in the topic. I believe that this article genre is an essay because he is writing about his outlook and points of the topic. The shortage of organs available, and the flaws that are currently in place when it comes to transplants made this author switch sides. Lewis Burrows eventually decides that through all of the pros and cons that are involved with it, he does think that the selling of organs should be legalized. 

Works Cited

  1. Burrows, Lewis. “Selling Organs for Transplantation.” Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine. Ebscohost, web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?vid=2&sid=61bde767-888f-465c 9e70-b7b15b2d5adf %40sessionmgr4010&hid=4204&bdata=JnNpdGUSZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d %3d#db=a9h&AN=14369098. Originally published in Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, vol. 71, no. 4, Sept. 2004, pp. 251-54. Accessed 19 Oct. 2016.
  2. MacKay, Joanna. “Organ Sales Will save Lives.” The Norton Field Guide to Writing, by Richard Bullock and Maureen Daly Goggin, 3rd ed., W. W. Norton & Company, pp. 119-24.

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A Comparison of the Similarities and Differences Between Organ Sales Will Save Lives by MacKay and Selling Organs for Transplantation by Burrows. (2021, Sep 10). Retrieved from https://studymoose.com/a-comparison-of-the-similarities-and-differences-between-organ-sales-will-save-lives-by-mackay-and-selling-organs-for-transplantation-by-burrows-essay

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