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William Blake Essay Topics & Paper Examples

William Blake’s “Infant Joy” and “Infant Sorrow,

I chose William Blake’s “Infant Joy” and “Infant Sorrow,” because they represent two different perspectives of innocence. I particularly liked “Infant Joy,” due to its dark symbolism, imagery, and figurative depiction of innocence. It is quite shocking that an infant would describe a new world as “dangerous” (Blake 2), where the infant’s parents would either weep or groan, as if in terror. Parents should be happy when they see their baby, but this poem paints a different picture. An infant described as a “fiend” is also hardly anticipated; this image is quite perplexing, because innocence has been doused into the murky waters of evil (Blake 4). At the same time, the infant, who has just been born, already feels “bound…

The Tiger and the Pig: Comparing two poems

TASK After taking part in a discussion in class about two poems. William Blake’s’ ‘The Tiger’ published in 1794 and ‘View of a Pig’ by Ted Hughes published in the 1960’s. Question 1 How do the poets’ attitudes to their respective animals differ? Firstly I think that in Hughes’ ‘View of a Pig’, it seems the poet has a kind of morbid fascination with the carcass of the animal. This is derived from the fact that there is a theme of deadness repeated throughout the poem. He seems fascinated with the ‘deadness’ of the pig. ‘Set in death, seemed not just dead’, ‘It was too dead’ and ‘too deadly factual’. Such strong imagery of nothingness felt towards the pig. In…

“The Tyger” VS “The Lamb” by William Blake

The two poems that I will analyse in depth, “The Lamb”, and “The Tyger” has many comparisons and contrasts between the two, although the same writer, William Blake, wrote them. He was born in London on 28, 1757 a period of time when enormous and rapid changes occurred in Europe, like the “Industrial”, “Agricultural” and the “French” revolutions. These “changes” in his life reflects his background and also had an effect on his style of writing. I will be looking at the subjects and themes of the poem and also focus at how Blake uses imagery, structure and form to create effects. The two poems “The Tyger” and “The Lamb” are based on the numerous events that happened in Blake’s…

An Analysis of the Poem “The Tyger” by William Blake

In the first stanza we can observe that the word “tiger” is written with a “y” instead of an “I”, this is to give the word an inclination towards Ancient Greece. This is closely followed by the alliteration “(…) burning bright (…)” .This alliteration is used by the author to emphasize the strong, bright, shiny colors of the “tyger”. The “symmetry” y highlighted in this stanza, this is closely related to the spelling of the word because in Ancient Greece symmetry is seen as ´beauty´. It also speaks about an “immortal hand or eye”, which makes an allusion to the creator of this tiger, which is said to be a god. The pattern of the poem is also symmetrical. The…

Innocence and experience in Blake’s Songs

A Romantic as he was, William Blake created his rather simple songs as an opposition to the poetry the eighteenth-century poets tried to impose, the so called ornated word,poetry of beautiful words saying very little. Songs of Innocence and Experience are about the “two contrary states of the human soul” as Blake put it. To confirm this he wrote some of the poems of Innocence with their pairs in Experience. Such a pair is “The Lamb” from Innocence and “The Tyger” from Experience. “The Lamb” consists of two stanzas, each one of them based on simple rhyming scheme like the children’s songs. The first stanza poses the questions while the second one is left for the answers. The questions are…

William Blake’s “The Tyger”

William Blake wrote The Tyger as a counterpart to The Lamb. In its simplest interpretation, it may seem that The Tyger represents the bad in mankind, and The Lamb represents the good. The speaker asks the tiger, “What immortal hand or eye, could frame thy fearful symmetry?” (4) The Tyger is majestic, but also dangerous and ferocious. However, Blake shows that the tiger is scary and evil sometimes, but maybe people just can’t understand the reason it was created. The tiger, like all living things, has a purpose. Blake supports this idea throughout the poem. He uses a couple of mythological allusions which, if understood, make this poem much more complex and meaningful. An allusion is made to Prometheus and…

William Blake’s “The Book of Thel”

William Blake’s contrast between innocence and experience is apparent in another book, aside from those that are named respectively, that was produced in 1789, The Book of Thel. Thel is a maiden who resides in the Vales of Har, which seems equivalent to the sheltered state of peace and innocence in the Songs of Innocence. Feeling unfulfilled and useless, Thel is invited to assume an embodied life by Clay. In doing so, she is exposed to the foreign world of sexuality and experience. This revelation terrifies her tremendously and she flees back to the safe, familiar Vales of Har, never to be enlightened. The Book of Thel presents the state of innocence confronted by the world of experience. Thel’s innocence…

William Blake’s Visions

William Blake’s Visions of the Daughters of Albion is a representation of the author’s convictions concerning repression and physical and religious slavery. Oothoon, Blake’s heroine, is subject to the rejection of two men who are unable to provide her with the pure, innocent love she so desires. Upon plucking Leutha’s flower, Oothoon indicates that she is ready to experience a man. The first she encounters, Bromion, rapes her, then claims he has impregnated her, making her his possession. Theotormon, the object of Oothoon’s affection, binds Bromion and his newfound lover together, punishing them for their display of sexuality, as seen in the frontispiece plate. Theotormon’s life is ruled by Urizen, his vision of God–a vision Oothoon condemns because it encourages…