sample
Haven't found the Essay You Want?
GET YOUR CUSTOM ESSAY SAMPLE
For Only $12.90/page

Why Do Students Shyout and Do Not Participate in Classroom Discussion Essay

Why do students shy out and do not participate in classroom discussion? Chapter 1 1. 1 Abstract Research has shown that shy students participate less frequently in class, are less likely to volunteer contributions, and give shorter and less elaborate answers to questions. Differences between shy and less shy students extend to their performance on standardized tests of vocabulary. The findings of two studies undertaken are presented; in each study participants were rated for shy out students by their class teachers.

The first study (of 10-year-olds) found that shy students test performance was influenced by the form of the test – they performed less well when the test was administered individually relative to the same test being administered to the whole class in a group setting. A second study asked students (aged 5-9 years) to sort and describe a set of pictures. The shy student was briefer with shorter mean length of utterances and less linguistic diversity, and this difference was obtained even when the influence of vocabulary test scores was statistically controlled.

The findings suggest that shy student responses are constrained by their concerns about evaluation and do not necessarily reflect underlying differences in competence. The paper discusses the implications of this research for the classroom. 1. 2 Introduction This study examines the hypothesis that shy, silent students that do not participate in classroom discussion of contraceptives in Pakistan underreport contraceptive usage. Data were obtained from the 1984-85 and 1994-95 Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys, the 1990-91 Demographic and Health Survey, and a Punjab 1993 survey. Shy or silent students were 11.

9% in 1990-91 and 11. 3% in 1994-95. The revised CPRs are 23. 7% and 29. 1%, respectively. In 1993, a follow-up survey among non-users in Punjab province showed that CPR increased from 13% in 1990-91 to 18% in 1993. Shy out students was the most widely used method, followed by the condom and female sterilization. The increase in CPR is attributed to more open reporting among shy or silent student. Revised CPRs that include shy or silent student were consistent with total fertility rates in all 3 nationally representative surveys. Typically shy or silent student were older by about 2.

3 years than current student, Shy or silent students had longer duration of greater illiteracy, and less contraceptive knowledge about methods and sources this is the cause they do not participate in classroom discussion. Research has distinguished shy out students from introversion, although they are typically related. Introverts simply prefer solitary to social activities but do not fear social encounters as do the shy, while extroverts prefer social to solitary activities. Although the majority of shy are introverted, shy extroverts are found in many behavioral settings. They are privately shy and publicly outgoing.

They have the requisite social skills and can carry them out flawlessly in highly structured, scripted situations where everyone is playing prescribed roles and there is little room for spontaneity. However, their basic anxieties about being found personally unacceptable, if anyone discovered their “real self,” emerge in intimate encounters or other situations where control must be shared or is irrelevant, or wherever the situation is ambiguous in terms of social demands and expectations. 1. 3 Problem statement The study was carried out under the title “why do students shy out and do not participate in classroom discussion”.

1. 4 OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY The objectives of the study were: 1. To identify the symptoms of shy out students. 2. To explore the causes of shy out students. 3. To find out the relationship of shyness with the self-esteem of students. 4. To examine the effects of shyness on the self-esteem of shy out students. 5. Helping students learn more from lectures 6. Getting students to participate more in class 7. Recognizing the importance of conflict and conflict resolution in student learning groups 8. Introducing and reinforcing active learning 9. Getting students to come to class having read the assignment 10.

Getting and giving feedback on meaningful class participation 11. Letting the classroom environment foster student participation 1. 5 Significance of topic There was a tendency for shyness to correlate significantly with measures of academic attainment. Even though the coefficients are moderate and explain little variance in test scores they are still meaningful and suggest that shy out students does have an impact on academic success. There exists some evidence of links between shyness and intelligence test scores, attainment measures, teacher-rated intelligence and academic performance but this has scarcely been explored.

Contemporary theories of learning emphasize the importance of social interaction for learning, including the contribution of students’ active participation in classroom discussion. This suggests the value of exploring the educational significance of shy out students and reticence – characteristics that may cause teachers few problems or draw attention to a student’s behavior but that might influence their achievement and adjustment. Being part of a discussion is a skill to learn, just like taking good lecture notes or learning to write a good essay exam. You are not doing shy students a favor by letting them off the hook completely.

Rather, emphasize to your class that in order to have productive discussions, everyone needs to make a contribution. This can be done in a variety of ways: good listening, asking good questions, challenging what someone has said appropriately and inviting. Chapter 2 Review of Literature Shyness as a “state of discomfort or inhabitation in interpersonal situations that interferes with pursuing one’s interpersonal or professional goals”. According to Cheek & Melchoir shyness involves the tendency to feel worried, awkward or tense when in the presence of others due to the prospect of interpersonal evaluation.

Zolton and Long said that shyness is a fear of, or shy out students from, other people or social situations, can have many different causes depending on the individual student and the specific circumstances. Shyness is something that all students experience at one time or another. In most cases it is a normal, temporary behavior. In students, some shy out students is normal, especially when they are around 5-6 of age, and then again at about two years of age. Shyness at these ages is considered a normal part of development.

Shyness becomes a problem in a student when it interferes with relationships with other people, with social situations, school, and other important aspects of a student’s life. In the light of the results of many psychological surveys concluded that substantial number of students regards themselves as shy. Shyness becomes problematic when it leads to the patterns of behavior that includes reluctance to enter social situations discomfort and inhibition in the presence of others exaggerated self, unresponsiveness, an increasingly negative social concept, or a combination of these .

Shy individuals are anxious and unsure of themselves in social situations and often try to avoid interacting with others . Minimum level of shyness does not create problems for students. Frequent exposure to a particular or different situation makes them confident. But if they avoid contact with people, students of their age or exposure to different situations than shyness can create different problems for them. 2. 1 What is shyness? Almost all students act shy at times, especially when encountering a new person or situation.

Quite sensibly most students take time to figure out what to do (and not do!) when presented with a novel situation. With time, most students start to feel comfortable in a new situation or with a person they’ve recently met and, therefore, act more outgoing, relaxed, and spontaneous.

Some students, however, warm up much more slowly than others. Shy students may look tense or distracted in institution as they worry about becoming the center of attention or doing something embarrassing. Teachers never see the students at home smiling, laughing, and chatting away with family members. 2. 2 Quiet or Shy out Students Even in small groups some students are quiet or shy.

When we use learning logs, these students often describe their anxiety about revealing their ideas. Stating that all students are expected to participate in a discussion is likely to heighten that anxiety. We have these suggestions concerning shy students. First, the course description should make it clear that discussion is expected, and this should be emphasized in the first meeting of the class. Second, help should be available for shy students, from either the instructor or a counseling center. We strongly prefer helping students learn to participate, rather than helping them avoid taking part.

Third, be accepting of degrees of participation. Students who have the courage to confront their shyness need time to develop, and all of us have “bad hair” days, when things are going terribly, and we need to be quiet. 2. 3 Strategies to Overcome Shy out students The following strategies to help the students to overcome their shyness in classroom discussion. 1. Tell the students about times when you acted bashful. 2. Explain to the children how they will benefit from acting outgoing Prevent labeling of the students as “shy”. 4. Reward the students for outgoing behavior 6.

Read books with the students about individuals who overcome shyness or fears 8. Eliminate teasing of the students or reduce the impact 9. Teach the student to identify and to verbally express their emotions 10. Relationship of Shyness with Self-Esteem students 2. 4 Causes of shy out students Some students seem naturally shy, while others may revert to being shy because they are scared, ashamed or simply conditioned by past experiences to do so. A lack of confidence can cause a child to become shy, especially if she has been given reason to doubt her abilities in the past.

This may lead to a student not participating in the classroom or having difficulty connecting with other students. * Lost Discussion Skills Students who do not interact with others in the classroom miss opportunities to learn crucial interpersonal skills. Also, students miss opportunities to develop debating skills. Students must learn how to be a part of a group discussion, which is commonly used in college classrooms and corporate boardrooms. * Lost Assertiveness Shy students may be less willing to mention when they are struggling with class material, causing them to not receive the help they need.

People often interpret timidity as a sign of being stuck up, which can put off many people who would otherwise give the student learning opportunities. * Low Self-Efficacy Shy students often develop low self-esteem and a lack of confidence, which reduces the chances that they will have the confidence to pursue challenges that give them learning opportunities. Shyness can also create an unfortunate cycle, as timid students do not develop effective communication skills. The lack of social skills leads to negative social experiences for the shy out students, which increases the anxiety she feels, leading to more shy behavior.

* Lost Opportunities Shyness is often caused by an exposure to new activities. Since students do not have as many experiences as adults, they experience more new activities, which can emotionally overwhelm those who have not yet developed coping skills. When students do not have enough experiences, they miss many opportunities to learn. Students who are very shy may be distracted from classroom material because of fears of social interaction or being called on in class. * Students often get ignored Shy students often have difficulty with class grades, but that largely comes from lower levels of class participation and oral skills.

Whether shyness is learned, cultural, or genetic, it can present problems for both students and instructors, most commonly in smaller classes in which participation is expected/encouraged. Most classrooms have one or more students who struggle with making themselves heard or participating in class discussions. These students are usually called “shy” because they may speak softly, prefer to work independently or refuse to speak up at all. Often these students flourish with written assignments or tests, but fail in areas that require participation with classmates or presentations in front of other students.

For shy students, keep some considerations in mind. Chapter 3 * Methodology The research approach was quantitative. Standardized questionnaires were used to collect data for the research. For this research, the research adopted analytical way of research. In this way, quantitative way of analysis was adopted. The researcher developed a questionnaire for getting the data from language teachers, and on the basis of collected data analysis was made. For effective research the feedback given by the teachers was presented in the tables and graphs. On the basis of quantitative analysis and suggestions were finalized.

Research Tools Opinion scale on the pattern of analytical way of research was developed. Population The students constituted population of study. Sampling Thirty students were selected as a sample using simple random technique. Method of research The study was descriptive in nature. The survey method was used to collect the data from the respondents. For this purpose a questionnaire was developed and was administered to the sample of the study. Collection of data The questionnaire was administered to the students. For each statement, teachers were to respond one option from the given four options.

* Analysis of data The data collected was tabulated, analyzed and interpreted in the light of the objectives of the study. Simple percentage was used for analysis of data. Table no. 3. 1 Do group activities break the shy out of the student? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 14| 47%| SA| 13| 44%| N| 0| 0%| DA| 0| 0%| SDA| 3| 10%| When students were asked the statement 47% students said they were agree group activities break the shy out of the student, 44% said strong agree and 10% said strong disagree. Table no. 3. 2 Have shy out students discuss their weakness in classroom as a communicator?

Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 0| 0%| SA| 9| 30%| N| 3| 10%| DA| 12| 40%| SDA| 6| 20%| 30% said strong agree,10 %neutral ,40%said disagree and 20%said strong disagree . Table no. 3. 3 Confer with parents give opportunities for shy out student to increase your involvement in classroom discussion? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 12| 40%| SA| 7| 24%| N| 3| 10%| DA| 8| 27%| SDA| 0| 0%| 40% said agree, 24%said strong agree, 10%said neutral and 27%disagree. Table no. 3. 4 Do shy students show sign of social anxiety? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 9| 30%| SA| 8| 27%| N| 3| 10%|

DA| 10| 34%| SDA| 0| 0%| 30% said agree, 27%said strong agree, 10%said neutral and 34%disagree. Table no. 3. 5 Do not force the shy out students to prefer in front of the classmates, but encourage him to do? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 12| 40%| SA| 8| 27%| N| 8| 27%| DA| 2| 7%| SDA| 0| 0%| 40% said agree, 27%said strong agree, 27%said neutral and 7%disagree. Table no. 3. 6 Do not make shy out students that feel rushed to answer quickly? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 4| 14%| SA| 20| 67%| N| 6| 20%| DA| 0| 0%| SDA| 0| 0%| 14% said agree, 67%said strong agree and 20%said neutral

Table no. 3. 7 Students have courage to comfort their shyness need time to develop? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 9| 30%| SA| 9| 30%| N| 3| 10%| DA| 27| 8%| SDA| 1| 4%| 30% said agree, 30%said strong agree, 10%said neutral, 8%disagree and 4% strong disagree. Table no. 3. 8 The environment which a student raised can affect his or her shyness in classroom discussion? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 7| 24%| SA| 18| 60%| N| 0| 0%| DA| 17| 5%| SDA| 0| 0%| 24% said agree, 60%said strong agree and 5%disagree. Table no. 3. 9 Some students have problematically shy out in varying degree?

Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 3| 10%| SA| 3| 10%| N| 20| 67%| DA| 2| 7%| SDA| 2| 7%| 10% said agree, 10%said strong agree, 67%said neutral, 7%disagree and 7%strong disagree. Table no. 3. 10 Shy out student diversity affect learning? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 9| 30%| SA| 13| 44%| N| 2| 7%| DA| 6| 20%| SDA| 0| 0%| 30% said agree, 44%said strong agree, 7%said neutral and 20%disagree. Table no. 3. 11 Can we suggest strategies for shy out students which help students for classroom discussion? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 11| 37%| SA| 11| 37%| N| 6| 20%| DA| 2| 7%| SDA| 0| 0%|

37% said agree, 37%said strong agree, 20%said neutral and 7%disagree. Table no. 3. 12 Can we help shy out students to set social development goal for discussion? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 11| 37%| SA| 14| 47%| N| 2| 7%| DA| 3| 10%| SDA| 0| 0%| 37% said agree, 47%said strong agree, 7%said neutral and 10%disagree. Table no. 3. 13 Can teacher s allow the students to speak for break the shyness? Options| Frequency| Percentage| A| 8| 27%| SA| 10| 34%| N| 3| 10%| DA| 7| 24%| SDA| 2| 7%| 27% said agree, 34%said strong agree, 10%said neutral, 24%disagree and 7% strong disagree.

Chapter 4 4. 1 Procedure of the Study The researcher herself visited for data collection and personally met the student’s . The researcher briefed the students about the purpose of the research and the teachers identified shy out students, a careful observation was made by the researcher also and only those students were selected who were seemed to be really shy and do not participate in classroom discussion. 4. 2 Findings The data collected through questionnaires was analyzed through the research. The results were interpreted in the forms of tables.

* When students were opinion the statement 47% students said they were agree group activities break the shy out of the student, 44% opinion strong agree and 10% opinion strong disagree. * 30% the opinion they are strongly agree that have shy out students discuss their weakness in classroom as a communicator,10 %neutral ,40% disagree and 20% strong disagree . * 40% opinion they are agree that confer with parents give opportunities for shy out student to increase their involvement in classroom discussion , 24%opinion strong agree, 10%opinion neutral and 27%disagree.

* 30% opinion they are agree do shy students show sign of social anxiety, 27%opinion strong agree, 10% opinion neutral and 34%disagree. * 40% opinion they are agreeing that do not force the shy out students to prefer in front of the classmates, but encourage him to do? 27% opinion strong agrees, 27% opinion neutral and 7%disagree. * 14% students opinion agree do not make shy out students that feel rushed to answer quickly, 67% opinion strong agree and 20% opinion neutral * 30% students opinion they are agree students have courage to comfort their shyness need time to develop, 30% opinion strong agree, 10% opinion neutral, 8%disagree and 4% strong disagree.

* 24% student’s opinions they are agreeing that the environment which students raised can affect his or her shyness in classroom discussion, 60% opinion strong agree and 5%disagree. * 10% students opinion they are agree some students have problematically shy out in varying degree, 10% opinion strong agree, 67% opinion neutral , 7%disagree and 7%strong disagree. * 30% students opinion they are agree shy out students diversity affect learning , 44% opinion strong agree, 7% opinion neutral and 20%disagree.

* 37% student’s opinion agrees can we suggest strategies for shy out which help students for classroom discussion? 37% opinion strong agrees, 20% opinion neutral and 7%disagree. * 37% students said opinion can we help shy out students to set social development goal for discussion, 47% opinion strong agree, 7% neutral and 10%disagree. * 27% students opinion agree that can teachers allow the students to speak for break the shyness, 34% strong agree, 10% neutral, 24%disagree and 7% strong disagree. 4. 3 Explanation

Almost all students act shy at times, especially when encountering a new person or situation. Shy sensibly most students take time to figure out what to do (and not do! ) when presented with a novel situation. With time, most students start to feel comfortable in a new situation or with a person they’ve recently met and, therefore, act more outgoing, relaxed, and ontaneous. Some students, however, warm up much more slowly than others. Student who is shy may not respond when spoken to by a teacher or classmate even after weeks of academy.

Or they may say little, speak very softly, and avoid eye contact. These students may hover near other students day after day but never join the others in play. Shy students may look tense or distracted in institution as they worry about becoming the center of attention or doing something embarrassing. Teachers never see the students at home smiling, laughing, and chatting away with family members. * What is shyness? Almost all students act shy at times, especially when encountering a new person or situation. Quite sensibly most students take time to figure out what to do (and not do!) when presented with a novel situation.

With time, most students start to feel comfortable in a new situation or with a person they’ve recently met and, therefore, act more outgoing, relaxed, and ontaneous. Some students, however, warm up much more slowly than others. Student who is shy may not respond when spoken to by a teacher or classmate even after weeks of academy. Or they may say little, speak very softly, and avoid eye contact. These students may hover near other students day after day but never join the others in play.

Shy students may look tense or distracted in institution as they worry about becoming the center of attention or doing something embarrassing. Teachers never see the students at home smiling, laughing, and chatting away with family members. * What are the signs of shyness in a young student? Shy students tend to show at least 3 or 4 of the following behaviors in preschool or primary school. Shy students tend to: 1. Produce little or no voluntary speech 2. Follow directions but don’t respond verbally to them 3. Turn away when spoken to 4. Watch but don’t join other students in fun activities.

5. Speak softly * What are the effects of shyness on students in classroom discussion? The unfortunate effects of being shy include nervousness, decreased development of close relationships, interference with learning, and reduced opportunities to practice and improve social skills. As a shy student reaches, peers tend to start thinking of the child as not normal. This can in turn have negative effects on the child’s self-esteem. On the other hand, shy student tend to act out less than other students do, perhaps because they don’t want to call attention to themselves by doing something wrong.

Although some students outgrow shyness as they get older, others remain painfully shy their entire life. * Relationship of Shy out students with Self -Esteem Shy students are seen less friendly than others, maybe a bit standoffish, even cold in some circumstances. shy students probably even see themselves in a more negative than positive light. Because of this worry, their thoughts and strengths are limited to a very small circle of students; they are in fact only limited by their own thoughts and emotions.

They constantly think that others are slighting them, insulting them, or attacking them in some way. The shy students can actually handicap themselves with negative thoughts and wind up using their shyness as a crutch and an excuse for not pursuing more social occasions, it becomes to socialize, make friends, and establish relationships, both personal and professional. It becomes a self- defeating behavior. This kind of self-defeating behavior leads to more and more avoidance of any or all social encounters, until they become frozen in fear and completely unable to function in normal social circumstances.

They quite literally lose hope in their own ability to function normally in these circumstances, so they quit trying. if the children (adult) feel that there is a discrepancy between the way they are behaving and the way they would like to react, their self esteem is likely to be low. To avoid negative feeling, children may lower their expectations of themselves and accept a lower level of performance or social interaction than they are capable of, or may try to avoid further feeling of failure by withdrawing from the situation in which they feel that there self esteem to be threatened. 4. 4 Conclusion

Teachers may be able to help shy students considerably by using strategies that are relatively easy to implement and well matched to the teacher’s basic role as a helpful instructor to students. These strategies include providing self-concept support, encouragement, and opportunities to develop confidence and comfort in the classroom to shy and inhibited students, as well as closer monitoring, improved nonverbal communication, environmental engineering, and instructive suggestions or demands for improved concentration designed to maintain the attention of students prone to shy out students.

Most teachers seem to develop an intuitive understanding of some of the needs of shy students, but many could meet these needs more effectively by systematically applying the principles and strategies highlighted here. 4. 5 Suggestion of shy out students Suggestion one Assuming that you share a common Language with this student, the first step has to be to speak to him in his own language in order to ascertain what the problem is and if he is always shy. In other words is he shy when using his native language or does this shyness only occurs when he is trying to speak?

Secondly, it would be very useful to spend some time talking to him about various aspects connected to his one-to-one classes and in particular how he would like to be taught and what his aims are. You could emphasize the value of trying things out in English and learning from mistakes rather than being afraid of them. You could also clarify your role and make sure that he understands that you are there to help and to give him constructive feedback on his English. Suggestion two We provide opportunities for the shy out students to develop debating skills.

Provide best activities to break the shyness of the students. Suggestion three Teachers provide group work to make involvement of the students. They help and support the shy out students in classroom discussion and do not asked to him gave answer quickly. Suggestion four You could also use homework as the basis for speaking. If he has prepared a homework exercise (a grammar exercise or similar), go through it in the next class with him reading out the answers. It’s important that he gets used to hearing himself speaking this strange foreign language and feels comfortable with it.

Suggestion five Another factor could be the dynamic in the classroom. Sitting next to the student rather than standing or sitting opposite can create a feeling of co-operation and may help the student to overcome his shyness. Writing on sheets of paper on the table rather than the whiteboard could also help as could the use of visual aids on the desk such as maps, photographs, magazine pictures and so on. All of these can help to shift the focus away from the student. The important thing here is for you to experiment and find the style and approach that best suits your student. 4.

6 Recommendations * The students should talk to parents, friends, a mentor or anybody they trust most and should confide and express what they feel. * The students should avoid doing so many things at the same time. Because this could lead them to confusion and frustration if nothing gets accomplished. They must stick on one thing that they are good at. * Parents should teach their children how to behave in a social situation. * Parents should try to be good role models. They must let their children see those making social contacts, expressing themselves and interacting with others.

* Parents should help their children to feel themselves important, capable and adequate. Such feelings will enhance their self-esteem. * Teachers should avoid calling their students shy. If labeling occurs in the classroom, teachers should intervene. * Teachers should encourage shy students to participate actively in classroom activities 4. 7 SUMMARY Shy students participate less frequently in class, are less likely to volunteer contributions, and give shorter and less elaborate answers to questions. Differences between shy and less shy students extend to their performance on standardized tests of vocabulary. What is shyness in students?

Almost all students act shy at times, especially when encountering a new person or situation. Quite sensibly most students take time to figure out what to do (and not do! ) when presented with a novel situation. With time, most students start to feel comfortable in a new situation or with a person they’ve recently met and, therefore, act more outgoing, relaxed, and ontaneous. Some students, however, warm up much more slowly than others. * Causes of shy out students Some children seem naturally shy, while others may revert to being shy because they are scared, ashamed or simply conditioned by past experiences to do so.

A lack of confidence can cause a child to become shy, especially if she has been given reason to doubt her abilities in the past. 1. Lost Discussion Skills Students who do not interact with others in the classroom miss opportunities to learn crucial interpersonal skills. Students miss opportunities to develop debating skills. 2. Lost Assertiveness Shy students may be less willing to mention when they are struggling with class room discussion, causing them to not receive the help they need. 3. Lost Opportunities

When students do not have enough experiences, they miss many opportunities to learn. Students who are very shy may be distracted from classroom material because of fears of social interaction or being called on in class. 4. Students often get ignored Shy students often have difficulty with class grades, but that largely comes from lower levels of class participation and oral skills. Whether shyness is learned, cultural, or genetic, it can present problems for both students and instructors, most commonly in smaller classes in which participation is expected/encouraged. 5. Low Self-Efficacy.

Shy students often develop low self-esteem and a lack of confidence, which reduces the chances that they will have the confidence to pursue challenges that give them learning opportunities. Shyness can also create an unfortunate cycle, as timid students do not develop effective communication skills. * Strategies to Overcome Shyness of students Following strategies to help the students to overcome their shyness. 1. Tell the students about times when you acted bashful 2. Explain to the children how they will benefit from acting outgoing Prevent labeling of the children as “shy”.

3. Expose the children to unfamiliar settings and people 4. Prompt the children to interact with others 5. Reward the children for outgoing behavior * Signs of shy out students 1. Produce little or no voluntary speech 2. Follow directions but don’t respond verbally to them 3. Turn away when spoken to 4. Watch but don’t join other students in fun activities 5. Make little or no eye contact * Teachers do to help shy out students 1. Put children in pairs or other small groups and lead them into an activity that requires interaction. 2. Prompt interaction between students. 3.

Give shy students plenty of time to respond to questions or to speak to the class. 4. Show empathy and understanding. 5. Show warmth. 6. Reward outgoing behavior. * Effects of student’s shyness on classroom discussion Effects of being shy include: 1. Nervousness in discussion. 2. Decreased development of close relationships. 3. Interference with learning. 4. Reduced opportunities to practice in classroom discussion. 5. Improve social skills. References Byrnes, A, D. (1984). Forgotten children in classrooms: Development and Characteristics. The elementary school journal, Vol. 84, No. 3 [Online] Available: http:


Essay Topics:


Sorry, but copying text is forbidden on this website. If you need this or any other sample, we can send it to you via email. Please, specify your valid email address

We can't stand spam as much as you do No, thanks. I prefer suffering on my own