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Week 1 Discussion Essay

Chapter 1 of your textbook includes, on page 9, Table 1.1, “Managing Change: Some Lessons from the Four Stories.” Review the four “lessons” (bullet points) on the table, and think about what some of the key “learning points” you gleaned about change from these stories. Then, do one of two things:1. Post the top three learning points you gleaned from the stories, and include how the stories for change helped you learn these points, or2. Research one of the four companies and see how or if that company has since changed (yet more) since the time of the book’s publication.

How did that recent change fit with or not fit in with the “lessons” that the textbook mentions the company “learned” from their original set of changes? Explain what you find (bring the URL of the research/article you used to help you).Your instructor will follow up with you with additional questions throughout the week to push the learning further. Feel free to discuss your classmates’ findings and thoughts on these questions with each other as well. Welcome to Week 1| Instructor Prondzinski | 6/17/2012 6:57:22 AM|

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| Class,The opening segment contains a number of questions requiring a response. Start off the week by selecting one of the questions and provide a detailed response.Dr. Dale|
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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Joshua Collier | 7/14/2012 9:11:07 PM|
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| One thing that I found very interesting was that in three of four instances the CEO who was acting as the change agent was replaced, and several of the changes undone. I think it shows a few things; one that we should not be afraid of being replaced if we believe that the changes we are supporting are needed, and two we should not be afraid to undo some moronic change that was made by our predecessor, but finally it shows that there are good things and bad things with each change and as we progress as a company we need to accept the good and move to improve the areas we see as lacking. |

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Antoinette Watson | 7/11/2012 10:56:01 PM|
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| After reading the HP and Compaq story I learned that sometimes companies take big risks regardless of what the majority of the company thinks. I learned that not all change works and its important for the company to realize that and change things back when necessary. Another thing that I learned about this company’s journey through change is that it required a lot of restructuring and merging of two different cultures which is not easy to do.|

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Yadean Sum | 7/11/2012 4:16:30 PM|
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| Even in the company I’m working for change can be pushed upon everyone if someone in power decides its best for the company. The majority can resist but ultimately those who have earned there place as rightful leaders in the workforce truly have a better understanding of whats better for a company. I work at a satellite company called Digital Globe here in Colorado and just today our VP had decided to push a major change moving our process to that of an agile structure than our typical waterfall method. Many had objected but it was up to her to make the choice despite the words of others.|

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Joshua Collier | 7/15/2012 12:38:54 PM|
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| Having dealt with a merger myself; sometimes it is easier to develop a whole new culture and standards than to get two groups to adopt the other’s culture. It is what we did. |
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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Thomas Harwell | 7/11/2012 9:19:06 PM|
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| Answering question 1, I found two points in the IBM story that work together. First, innovative changes often originate from lower levels of the organization because here we find the people who work with the various technologies on a daily basis. David Grossman found the rogue internet site and realized the marketing implications for IBM. But in order for the change to be supported throughout the organization, it needs a champion, or supporter, with the ability to influence senior management. In IBM’s case, when John Patrick attended Mr. Grossman’s presentation, they paired up to propagate the new strategy. Mr. Patrick brought his “connections” to the project to get “buy in” from higher management while Mr. Grossman had the technical capabilities.|

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Rae Davis | 7/13/2012 11:38:48 PM|
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| Thomas, in regards to the line you comment on “innovative changes often originate from lower levels of the organization”, I totally agree withthat statement due to the fact that those lower level employees are the ones who are working in the fields, in terms of having their hands on the equipment and having the full knowledge of what improvements are needed in the work field. Innovation often derive from insight and even frustration at times. Good post.

Rae Davis|
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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Michael Rohde | 7/11/2012 1:49:17 PM|
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| One of the main learning points that I read was that communication needed to be thorough and maintained through the course of the changes to ensure that complacency didn’t set in or any regression in the implementation of the changes. Another is that consideration should be given to the concerns of the individuals that will be directly affected. It is important to note these because these are sometimes the breaking points for an unsuccessful implementation. Especially considering the individuals affected, it so simple just a little extra time understanding how and what the change will affect will ease the process in the long run.|

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Courtney Chairez | 7/14/2012 7:17:24 AM|
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| Good post, with in any situation communication is a plus. Good communication allows for understanding of what needs to take place in order to make the change go by smoother. Your right they should consider the people that will be affected by this change because not many people have the capabilities to handle change. Being able to communicate well will give the individuals a understanding on how change will affect everyone. |

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Lucy Zubek | 7/8/2012 12:47:57 AM|
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| After reading these stories, I recognized that all of them had a lot in common. The changes were made without preparing the customers, employees, and stockholders. For example in the Kodak article the investors were caught by surprise by the cuts Kodak was implementing. It is very important for companies to explain to their customers, employees, and stakeholders why the change is necessary and how it will benefit them.

Without communicating these changes it will stir up a lot of negative reactions. Most employees with less seniority or lower education will worry about their future with companies and will most likely persuade poor performance in their positions while still employed.Among these four companies and many others, we have witnessed drastic employment reductions within last several years, which indeed, in my opinion was caused by varies factors, but mainly by lack of communication. Change is good and often necessary in order for companies to succeed but before such a change is implemented everyone should be on the same page, and all pros and cons should be taking into the consideration. |

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Instructor Prondzinski | 7/9/2012 12:15:40 PM|
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| Lucy opens our discussion regarding the stories of change. As you read her comments, can anyone describe how the change ideas presented in the stories compare to the change experiences you’ve had in the past?Dr. Dale|

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Lucy Zubek | 7/9/2012 2:20:12 PM|
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| Another example I find interesting is the HP example. I believe Carly Fiorina handled the premerger with Compaq fairly well, but failed in the post-merger. She seems to have reacted like a dog chasing a car and then not knowing what to do once the car stopped. I think the last lesson learned is that change is an ongoing process and completion of one phase is the beginning of another. |

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Julie Beth | 7/9/2012 8:16:48 PM|
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| Regarding Lucy’s comment about change she mentions communication. Communication is a necessity in everything we do in the work place and our lives. One of the biggest down falls when companies are going through changes is the lack of communication to their employees. When companies are going through change they need to have clear and precise goals and communicate them to their employees when the company keeps the employees informed and let them know the processes and procedures that need to be taken to complete that goal and the employees have the understanding what the goals are and they are willing to change they will be a better chance of success.|

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Clara Ofori-Mante | 7/11/2012 9:40:15 PM|
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| Whether change is good or bad is relative because it depends on how the change is carried out. It is good when it is planned properly and carried out in the right way but it bad when it is rushed and those affected by the change are left to suffer. In the 4 stories, the idea for change was a good one because they all saw a problem of which they needed to solve by changing how things were being done. The change experience that I have had in my previous is very like the one’s described in the stories. The company I worked was sold to a foreign company from another country.

Now everyone who worked in the company knew about the change and several meeting were held to explain the change and sale would take place and how the current employees would be affected. In the end when the company was sold and the change is still ongoing as now there is a merger of two cultures new ideas and ways of doing things are being introduced everyday. Communication played a big role, because looking back now if there was a lapse in communication, the process would not have gone the way it did.|

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| | RE: Welcome to Week 1| Antoinette Watson | 7/12/2012 10:16:16 PM|
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| What Lucy said sounds very familiar. Any kind of change can shake up employees and customers, but in my experience the more information you can give people to understand the why behind whats going on and what changes will be occurring is important. The best time I have had dealing with a change in the company I was working for what when the store I was working for was changing locations and adding a whole new line of product that needed to be learned. The company held many training meetings and gave hands on practice to prepare us as best they could for the changes to come. It was still difficult to adjust to but it was based on nervousness rather than a backlash against the management.|

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| | HP and Managing Change| David Schupner | 7/9/2012 3:12:31 PM|
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| By acquiring Compaq Computer in 2001, HP was able to become the largest computer manufacturer in the world. HP was also able to implement Compaqs “build to order” manufacturing model, which HP did not have and badly needed for both businesses and consumers. These are examples of how providing a vision of the future for HP came true. Presently HP’s marketshare in the PC market has only been strengthened as its only other major competitor is Dell.

The book mentions restructuring is a common organizational change when confronted with problems, and that cannot be more true today for HP. The corporation has consolidated itself primarily into three divisions that make up 97% of its net revenues. Initially CEO, Hurd created these divisions to provide clear responsibility for division managers and product offerings. Today the consolidation continues, as CEO Leo Apotheker has proposed spinning off its PC division. Even though HP is the largest computer manufacturer it has not produced the revenues it was looking for from the merger.http://www.brighthub.com/computing/hardware/articles/39780.aspx http://news.cnet.com/2100-1001-272528.html

http://tech.fortune.cnn.com/2012/05/08/500-hp-apotheker/|
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| | RE: HP and Managing Change| Ikaika Genegabus | 7/11/2012 11:02:07 PM|
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| Great Links David. HP has been through several different changes after acquiring Compaq. I was actually working for HP as they were talking about selling their PC division. There has been tons of gossip about how samsung was going to buy it. HP also halted their mobile division too. I don’t know if you remember it, but they had a pretty decent tablet that started at around Ipad prices, then quickly dropped to 99 dollars in order to clear out their inventory. |

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| | RE: HP and Managing Change| David Schupner | 7/12/2012 2:43:41 AM|
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| Thats right. The Touchpad was created to compete against Apple’s iPad and other tablets running the Android operating system. HP realized the change in the market as the PC Market was maturing and the portable devices market was still growing. The Touchpad would remain on the market for only seven weeks before HP discontinued it. Weak sales were blamed for the cancelation, however many developers were having trouble programming applications on the operating system, and there were bugs in the software. The misstep cost HP 3.3 billion dollars in losses (TimesofIndia 2012). The technology was acquired by HP when it purchased Palm in 2010.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/tech/news/hardware/Why-HPs-TouchPad-tablet-was-bound-to-fail-Analysts/articleshow/11335805.cms|
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| | RE: HP and Managing Change| Ikaika Genegabus | 7/14/2012 4:36:55 PM|
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| Wow.. 3.3 Billion dollars in losses? I think they should stick to just their printers since it looks like that is the only thing they are making money off of. |
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| | HP’s Change| Charlie Kazarian | 7/9/2012 5:34:05 PM|
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|  Understand why change is both a creative and a rational process. From the HP story change is both a creative and rational decision because it not only gives you the chance to reinvent who you are and your stance on things but it gives you a chance to take the good from each side and make it better as well as take the bad and either get rid of it or improve upon it. Identify why there are limits on what the manager of change can achieve. There are limits to what a manager or CEO can do because too much change to fast can cause more resistance from the employees and the key is harmony or in HP’s situation synergy.

 Recognize how stories of change can illuminate key issues in managing change. I think that the one thing that sticks out the most is noticing that it is very important to have your employees backing. When the one worker said that it had earned her points, it really put into perspective that although she was the CEO she still had to earn respect. Appreciate the “roadmap” for this book and the multiple “images” approach that underlies it. Looking at the “roadmap” it helps you understand that the directive comes from the person that has the initial control to implement change. From there we see that 8 progression to successfully imp[lamenting change|

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| | Stories of change| Greg King | 7/9/2012 8:20:19 PM|
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| The top three learning points that I have include:

Change effects culture
Change have both internal and external effects
Effective change involves planning

The HP and Compaq merger are an example of all of these. Obviously like the text stated that merging the two corporate cultures was going to effect the transition of the merger. What Fiorina did was smooth things over and make it an easy transition as possible. During the merger she had to understand that both employees, investors and the general public were both anxious as to what the next move was going to be for the company. Finally, the change required much planning, from the top down and from both companies.

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| | RE: Stories of change| Brian Dunnicliffe | 7/11/2012 12:12:25 PM|
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| Great post Greg, I definitely agree and there are some others here which are really insightful too. To add to what has already been said, I wanted to highlight one more thing which really stuck out to me. A learning lesson which was mentioned under the HP section was:

“More successful communication strategies are likely to be those that “touch” the people who they are addressed”

Ian Palmer (2008). Managing Organizational Change [2] (VitalSource Bookshelf), Retrieved fromhttp://online.vitalsource.com/books/0077587448/id/ch1tab1

To me, this is a crucial part of change in any organization and lends itself to the human side of change management. This is a workshop which I offer in my current position to organizations who are going through change because often times that is the piece that can slip through the track but it is just as important as any other piece to ensure they have the understanding and support or “buy-in” from the employees.

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| | Change| Lisa Dixon | 7/9/2012 10:55:16 PM|
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| Change is inevitable. People are reluctant to change because of the uncertainty of what the change will bring. Pressure to change can come from both inside and outside of the organization. There are many different reasons why companies change such as dwindling sales, new technology, new opportunities, competition, and or new government regulations to name a few. In any case communication is the key component needed to guide employees and shareholders. Managers will need to develop multiple levels of communication to guide their organization through change and it should start with the communication of a vision.|

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| | RE: Change| Instructor Prondzinski | 7/10/2012 12:29:54 PM|
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| David, Charlie, Greg, and Lisa provide their thoughts regarding the stories of change. As you review their thoughts, what are some of the common change themes that you find in all of the stories? In what ways is change really the same every where you go?Dr. Dale|

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| | RE: Change| Kitty Patterson | 7/14/2012 7:43:17 PM|
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| Some of the common changes themes are there is always a struggle to convince others to get on board. There will always be conflict whenever there is change. The people who believe in the changes that they brought to the table have to stay strong and true to the beliefs. In all three cases somewhere during the course of change each company went back to the basics.|

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| | RE: Change| Lucas Shepard | 7/15/2012 4:02:24 PM|
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| Some common themes are that change needs to be accepted by all members of the organization in order for it to be effective; change needs to be made for the right reasons; employees opinions must be considered and respected before any change goes into effect; and solid planning must take place in order for the implementation of change to be the most effective.

Change is the same everywhere in that it is done because a need or a want is felt. Whether this is a response to an old process or in order to stay competitive, it is based on the belief that a company needs to move in a different direction. |

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| | RE: Change| David Schupner | 7/10/2012 4:59:19 PM|
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| Modified:7/11/2012 10:15 AM|
| Some types of change that we have seen in the stories so far are mergers and acquisitions, new broom pressure, and Identity pressure.”The only thing constant is change” is a famous quote that helps make sense of what is going on. How you deal with that change is what can set you apart from others.|

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| | RE: Change| Courtney Diggins | 7/11/2012 10:41:24 AM|
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| Mergers and reorganizations are two common themes in the stories as the two go hand in hand. Once two companies merge together you have two sets of employees who do the same jobs and its someones job to decide who gets to continue with the company and what individuals will need to go. I think mergers may be the biggest change for everyone involved and not just the company because the employees suffer the most. |

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| | RE: Change| Lisa Dixon | 7/11/2012 4:48:11 PM|
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| I agree that it is the employees that suffer the most because of the uncertainty of change within an organization. In all the situations, you could find mixed emotions between employees and shareholders. A manager should be very aware of the different emotions that change will bring out and be ready to communicate an understanding of their feelings as well as the new vision for the company. The manager will have to become all the images of change during various states. And sometimes there could be a change in management to get through all the phases of change.|

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| | RE: Change| Carl Henning | 7/11/2012 12:06:23 PM|
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| Yes, employees are the ones who suffer most and usually immediately from Mergers. I also agree with Lisa that communication is an important part of a Merger. Unfortunately, I’ve seen where it was used in place of actual thought and investigation into two companies merging.

Sprint and Nextel merged while I was an employee at Sprint. Communications abounded in the public and in private about what this was going to mean for the new company. Lead management from both sides talked about the strengthened position in the market and even got around to talking about price savings. They never actually said that the cost savings were going to come from getting rid of employees until the merger was unstoppable, but we in the company knew.

Funny thing is with all the communicating going on they forgot to take a look at a few of the details. For instance, that the Nextel “Push to Talk” network was incompatible with Sprints infrastructure. “Sprint Nextel (S, Fortune 500) said Tuesday that it plans to shut down the Nextel network as early as June 30, 2013… The $36 billion “merger of equals” never came together as Sprint and Nextel planned. Nextel’s network ran on a different technology than Sprint’s, making it difficult for the combined company to optimize its wireless infrastructure assets.” http://money.cnn.com/2012/05/29/technology/sprint-nextel-shutdown/index.htm

Some mergers and other business decisions seem to be made more from a Shark feeding frenzy than an actual need or advantage point of origin.|
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| | RE: Change| Julie Beth | 7/10/2012 6:56:14 PM|
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| One of the common change theme that you find in all the stories is the fear of the unknown. It doesn’t matter if it is a merger & acquisition change, downsizing change or power, political pressure change etc. There is fear from the top of the management chain all the way down to the employees, and it can also effect the consumers. Having a clear precise vision and how one executes the vision to your employees and consumers and the importance of communication will help to decide if the change is going to be a failure or a success. The more the fear is taken away the more chances there will be a positive outcome. |

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| | RE: Change| Greg King | 7/12/2012 7:03:40 PM|
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| Some of the changes listed in the stories include mergers and redefining the way the company operates and the direction of the company. I can resonate with David with his statement “The only thing that is constant is change”. Companies constantly change their direction depending on how their market move or to meet the needs of their customers. Even in my company, big changes almost regularly, and when that happens, it effects to the culture of the company.|

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| | change| Jacqueline Vargas | 7/9/2012 11:34:01 PM|
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| The Hewlett-Packard merger with Compaq Computer shows how change to the organization was needed due to competition of company rival such as Dell and Sun Microsystems. Restructure to the company was vital in order to implement change. Employees lost jobs and job cuts due to the merger, challenges of change and the reaction of the employees are what come along with change. Communication is vital, keeping employees informed of the vision and future of the company is also vital. When companies have struggles and need to succeed, many times restructuring is common in organizational change.|

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| | RE: change| Lucy Zubek | 7/10/2012 4:33:06 PM|
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| As Jacqueline stated, in the Hewlett-Packard a lot of employees lost their jobs due to the merger, however this is not always the case. The Green Mountain case in chapter 3 is in my opinion is a great example of solving employment issues, in particular when employees are leaving on their own. Green Mountain had a high turnover of employees moving on to work for other companies. However, the other companies considered the employees from Green Mountain to be the best employees they have working for them.

These other resorts are indicating that employees who have worked for Green Mountain are the best trained employees. While Green Mountain struggled to retain their top notch employees, they considered themselves to be a mentor since their training strategies was considered high quality. With that being said, they turned their problem into a solution.

(Ian Palmer 40)Ian Palmer. Managing Organizational Change, 2nd Edition. McGraw-Hill Learning Solutions, 2008. <vbk:0077587448#outline(2.7)>.|
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| | RE: change| Yadean Sum | 7/14/2012 3:33:57 PM|
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| I’ve seen case where a company that is beginning to dwindle buys out the competition in hopes of becoming the monopoly. Actually I’ve experienced this first hand. I work for a company known as DigitalGlobe and other than us and GeoEye (another satellite imaging company) there really is no other competition. Once GeoEye found that we had won over the government contract from them, they attempted to purchase our company in hopes of regaining that multi billion dollar contract.|

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| | Top 3 learning points| Tina Hoskie | 7/10/2012 5:38:06 PM|
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| 1.) HP – Pressures to change come from both outside and inside organizations. 2.) Kodak – Change involves risk and uncertainty
3.) Kodak – Managers of change need to address the question for staff of “How
will I be affected”?

Companies are approached but other companies all the time to be bought out by other companies…. claiming they can make them grow bigger and better… paint pretty pictures of how the change will be really good for all concerned. These are pressures from the outside. Then the pressures from the inside trying to convince stakeholders/stockholders that a change will be good for the company. Kodak , had many pressures from investors and buy-out groups.

Anytime there is change there will always be risk and uncertainty… but it is in how companies handle the risks that either make a companies change successful or not.

And the mangers do need to know how this change will affect them.. from past experience, some managers are forced to eliminate employees are even their job could be on the line. But more importantly, the affect on the manager is in making decisions about letting employees go. That is a difficult job for any manager to have to face.

From the stories, these points seemed to work well for HP, Kodak on the other hand experienced dowsizing and eliminating of plants in 2005. This did not look good for the future of Kodak.|
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| | RE: Top 3 learning points| Jacqueline Vargas | 7/10/2012 7:21:58 PM|
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| Tina,
You make a good point about change, yes I agree that when change comes companies make it look good, but unfortunately we don’t know how it will affect managers and employees. I too think it is never good when jobs are eliminated and that downsizing most definately involves layoffs and jobs lost. The lecture states that many times change impacted by layoffs affect families and terminations wreck careers, these are are negatives that exist
in change.|

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| | RE: Top 3 learning points| Courtney Diggins | 7/13/2012 8:01:01 AM|
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| Companies are able to make change look good from the outside by not letting consumers know whats actually going on inside. I think for Kodak they had a lot at stake. Here is a company that has been doing so well providing a service that they want to eliminate to be like the other companies. Not only are they risking their name as a business but the employees as well. I have never been a manager and had to let people go, but I have been in a position where a job was questionable due to the companies inability to deal with change. |

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| | RE: Top 3 learning points| Instructor Prondzinski | 7/11/2012 10:41:56 AM|
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| Jacqueline and Tina provide their thoughts regarding the stories of change. As you read their comments, can anyone discuss one of the stories that is of interest to you. What would you have personally done to implement a change plan in that organization? Dr. Dale|

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| | RE: Top 3 learning points| Charlie Kazarian | 7/11/2012 6:31:36 PM|
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| One of the major break downs in existing companies and especially companies that are going through changes is communication. If it were me that had to implement it I would share my vision and mission to all of the employees and work very closely with management to have them not only get their concerns but also their employees concerns. That way all the guessing and worry of “what is going to happen next?” would be gone or at least
addressed. |

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| | RE: Top 3 learning points| Jesus Pintado | 7/12/2012 9:24:48 PM|
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| As I’m reading comments about these stories the one topic that interest me the most is the external factors of decision making by McDonald’s. McDonald’s is one of the largest corporations in the world. Their approach of making changes even when things are going well separate them from their competitors. McDonald’s has many external factors to consider since they are global. What interest me the most is what may work here in the U.S. would not work overseas. For example, advertising, marketing and different food types. This approach is what helped this corporation to become successful in the fast food industry.|

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| | RE: Top 3 learning points| Lucy Zubek | 7/11/2012 6:38:26 AM|
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| They all seem to have miss read the manner and degree of change that was ultimately required. They were reacting to potential crisis situations that did not allow them time to properly think them through and analyse the possible outcomes. It also appears that they only had a plan A and did not consider plan B as a backup.

Contingency plans in the event that the change does not go as planned are crucial. Communication is a big factor in reducing conflict, anxiety, and frustration. Therefore, I would personally allow employees to submit their suggestions and designate a special department to review all ideas submitted by them. The agency I work for encourages employees to submit their suggestions. If the suggestion is approved and implemented, the employee is rewarded. The cash amount received varies as it depends on the idea, but it can amount anywhere between $100 to $500 per suggestion. |

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| | RE: Top 3 learning points| Jacqueline Vargas | 7/11/2012 10:02:45 AM|
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| Lucy,
I want to work for you, I agree with you employees do need a voice and usually the employee is the person doing the job everyday and knows what works and what does not. When proposal is drawn up and it looks good on paper, it is not until the person actually starts to implement the project can we really tell if it is going to work. We also need to keep in mind that in time is when we can really tell. But I like your suggetstions of $100-$500, for my company I would be submitting change forms.|

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| | RE: Top 3 learning points| Lucy Zubek | 7/11/2012 12:10:04 PM|
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| Jacqueline,In my opinion, having employees involved and let them to suggest their ideas is great. Of course not everyone is rewarded as some ideas are repeatable or not efficient enough to implement them, but due to the employees ideas the agency I work for (Social Security Administration), is able to apply changes accordingly without having implementing unnecessary changes. In addition, any time change is implemented, employees are notified and if necessary, training is conducted. |

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| | RE: Top 3 learning points| Julie Beth | 7/11/2012 1:18:43 PM|
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| The top 3 learning points that I like are make smaller changes first because it helps reinforce sincerity and credibility from senior management, if the smaller changes are successful then it reduces fear and brings trust to management. Managers of change need to address the staff on how the change is going to affect them, the more the manger communicates and gives clear instruction on the changes it will reduce the fear of how it is going to affect the employees because they will have the answer. Change in and of itself is not necessarily good for the company. It is very important for management to look at all aspects before making a change sometime changing something to accommodate one thing is not the best interest of the company as a whole. |

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| | learning points| Sadaf Durrani | 7/11/2012 11:54:05 AM|
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| First of all, in HP story, I learned that implement of change came from inside organization and outside organization. This is when other companies appraoch for buying the company for improvement. And also where stockholders convince for the change in betterment. On the other hand, in the Kodak’s point of change involved in uncertainty as well as managers addressing to the staff. This was shown through the influence for change from investors and other groups.

Change is indeed inevatible. Where there is change, risk and uncertainty comes along. Sometime change brings growth and others it does not work so well. |
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| | stories of change| Lucas Shepard | 7/11/2012 8:38:15 PM|
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| The top 3 learning points I have obtained from these stories are: 1) There are many different interests that need to be considered and addressed when initiating any sort of organizational change. 2) In order for any change to effectively take place and organization needs to know its culture and how to take the necessary steps to change that. 3) Change involves risk and uncertainty, which must be assessed and used correctly in order for the change to be effective.

the stories helped me learn these points because they showed how each organization dealt with each of these points and used them to make the change effective. The Kodak story is the one that really stuck out to me as they cut their dividends and raised more capital for technology purchases. Cutting dividends can be a very risky move and it really paid off for them. |

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| | RE: stories of change| Greg King | 7/14/2012 1:41:46 AM|
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| I totally agree with point number three. I think that is the biggest thing that holds us back from change is the uncertain effects of the change. Can you imagine what we would be capable of if we were fearless to change?|

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| | Stories of Changes| Rae Davis | 7/11/2012 9:20:31 PM|
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| Hewlett-Packard – More successful communication strategies are likely to be those that touch the people to whom they are addressed.IBM – Making change stick requires persistence over time and actions need to be taken in multiple front.McDonald’s – Organizations face external pressures to change such as socially responsible products and services. Though I’m sure all the bullets points are important points to consider when speaking of organizational changes, the above three were the ones which jump out to me at the moment.

Having gone through several organizational changes during my tenure in the military where in some cases I was involved in the change process and others where I was not, I can appreciate the impact and the advantages of a successful organizational change process. I believe that this success depends heavily on effective communication, being persistent and taking the necessary action in each phase of the change process, as well as the internal and external pressure that forces changes in an organization. Change is inevitable and even though at times we resist it, it is important for organizations to recognize when changes are needed, and its is equally important that the organization formulate and plan that will
facilitate and manage the process through every phases of the change process|

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| | RE: Stories of Changes| Joshua Collier | 7/15/2012 12:49:40 PM|
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| Rae,
I couldn’t agree more! I too work for the DoD and the only consistent thing is change. A well planned, well communicated approach to change can mean the difference between success and failure. One interesting thing to add is that you must be willing to adapt your plan I have also seen changes get seriously derailed because the change process didn’t fit the organization’s needs, and leadership was unwilling to make changes. One fired commander later and the program was back on track with a few serious tweaks. Listen to the folks involved in the change they are often in the best position to observe it. Joshua|

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| | learning points| Jesus Pintado | 7/11/2012 9:31:39 PM|
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| 1. I learned that its important to understand the interest of internal and external stakeholders and the importance in decision making when taking risks and or merging with other companies. This story helped me realize the importance of stakeholders and how they effect decision making.

2. The second learning point came from the McDonald’s story. It is important to understand that change may be necessary even when things are going well, just to prepare for the future. This learning point opened up my understanding that change is inevitable even when things are going well.

3. The third learning point came from the Kodak story saying that the consequence of change cannot always be predicted. This story helped me realize that risk is necessary even when the consequences are very blurry and cannot be foreseen which makes this story the most interesting one. Taking risks in strategic decision making can make or break a company.|

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| | RE: learning points| Instructor Prondzinski | 7/12/2012 1:01:29 AM|
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| Sadaf, Luke, Rae, and Jesus provide their thoughts regarding the stories of change. As you review their comments, can anyone explain why the effective management of change represents a critical core competence that all organizations and leaders must master?Dr. Dale|

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| | RE: learning points| Brian Dunnicliffe | 7/12/2012 5:34:20 AM|
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| Effective management of change is a critical core competence that all organizations and leaders must master because, without it, effective change is much less likely to occur. Effective change is hard on organizations, leaders and individuals effected by change alike. At the same time, change is a constant and all organizations must be ready, willing and able to adopt change as necessary to stay relevant and profitable. Effectively managing the changes will make the process of changing easier and more streamlined so that it is easier for everyone involved to make a smooth transition and accept/move forward positively with in accordance with the change.|

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| | RE: learning points| Courtney Diggins | 7/15/2012 10:09:02 AM|
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| Managing change is critical because there are so many people involved. Not only are there peoples jobs in the line, the future of a company and investors money is at stake. A plan and thoroughness of the plan is necessary for any change to come to fruition.|

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| | RE: learning points| Antoinette Watson | 7/13/2012 11:13:28 AM|
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| Effective management of change is extremely important because there will always be change in how business’s operate and adjust to the changing market place. When a company doesn’t change it will eventually die off. So since change is necessary in many cases is makes sense that learning how manage and deal with change be a fundamental skill that all managers should learn. I think that most people in general are not that fond of change. So it is important that managers are open with the staff and everyone involved when a change is going to occur so that is doesn’t take people by surprise. They should also learn to expect that some employees might actively push back against change and that they will have to learn different tactics with how to professionally handle situations like that.|

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| | RE: learning points| Lucy Zubek | 7/13/2012 6:06:44 AM|
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| Change is a natural occurrence in business just as it is in one’s own personal life.As such, it is important for organizational changes to be managed effectively. This ensures that such changes won’t cause disruptions in the organization’s operations. Whatever the nature of the change – to be it a business process change or a restructure of the organization – it is important for the transition to be effectively managed to ensure that the organization will benefit from the change and not suffer during the adjustment period.Not only is change a natural occurrence in business, it is also part of an organization’s business strategy, as change would enable the organization to accommodate and profit from external developments.

In this regard, effective change management skills would be necessary to enable the organization to cope with the increasing changes in the corporate world, examples of which include legislative, strategic, and technological changes. These would also enable the organization to gain a competitive edge. In addition, effective change management skills would be necessary in the organization’s effort to empower its human resource where an increased level of responsibility and accountability is encouraged through the various ranks of employees.A company that does not allow change is bound to fail. It is only by accommodating and managing change effectively that an organization can continue to thrive.http://www.employeemanagement.co.uk/blog/2011/10/the-importance-of-effective-change-management/|

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| | RE: learning points| Michael Rohde | 7/13/2012 12:41:23 AM|
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| If a leader or organization doesn’t have this then they don’t have the ability to control how it operates at departmental or organizational levels. Change is inevitable and organizations have to be able to guide through the changes process toward success otherwise the ultimate reaction is rejection to the change. Which could result in failure for the intended changes and possibly the organization depending on the severity of the needed changes.|

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| | RE: learning points| Julie Beth | 7/14/2012 3:27:33 AM|
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| Per this article the steps a manager takes would make change more effective. The manager should establish objectives that are clear and detailed on what the goal is that is trying to be accomplished. The manager needs to organize a plan so there is structure on how this plan is going to go. The manager needs to communicate in clear stated information in a timely manner and make sure it is understood by the people involved. Motivate and develop your staff that way they don’t feel lost and things are getting done correctly. Managers should measure and analyze the progress and give and receive feedback.

http://www.customerservicemanager.com/6-steps-to-effective-management-during-change.htm|
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| | RE: learning points| Michael Rohde | 7/14/2012 2:28:48 PM|
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| Communication is the biggest portion of the entire change process aside from the actual plan itself which should be thoroughly scrutinized before the beginning stages of implementation. Communication if utilized correctly is what allows equal understand of the intended changes and allowing for dialogue for questions for better understanding or for clarifications on topics unaddressed to ease implementation. You can’t think of everything and the one thing that was missed will happen, prepared employees can isolate the issue and raise the question for resolution. More of a speed bump than a road block on the path to a successful implementation of change.|

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| | RE: learning points| Clara Ofori-Mante | 7/15/2012 2:21:27 PM|
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| Communication is indeed the most important aspect in the process of change, without it the whole business structure would break down and the intended change may cause more harm than good. According to this website i found ” some of the importance of communication are to,

to motivate employee and boost their morale
to facilitate manager – employee relations etc|
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| | Hewlett-Packard| Tina Hoskie | 7/12/2012 4:59:22 PM|
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| I found an article about some major changes that HP has been planning. The article was dated Aug. 2011, It talks about Dell being their big rival and since HP will be reducing their revenue by one-third, this will only boost Dell, who is the 2nd largest in the PC industry. It also mentions keeping their server and storage and network business but eliminating operations of tablets, smartphones and webOS business. It also looks like they plan to buy a British Software company.. Autonomy Corp for $10.3 billion.

So in some ways these changes will benefit areas of the business and could also hurt other areas.

http://www.statesman.com/business/hewlett-packard-plans-stunning-changes-to-company-could-1761212.html|
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| | Change| Courtney Chairez | 7/13/2012 6:50:23 AM|
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| Change is hard for everyone. We may start out doing things one way until that way is not useful to use anymore. The three many learning points that I learned from these four companies is that change sometimes is mostly for the better. To implement change you need to provide a vision of the future that is compelling, learn the success of previous changes and the extent of delivery of past promises, and that the consequences of change can not always be predicted. Hewlett provided this vision of a compelling future by suggesting a merger. Kodak company was conscious of promises to increase the company’s revenue that were not realized. The company was in fear of this transition as another half-hearted one. Kodak knew that the consequences of change could not always be predicted.|

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| | RE: Change| Charlie Kazarian | 7/15/2012 10:27:38 AM|
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| I agree with Courtney. Change can be a contributing factor to a companies success. Even when looking at a business from the perspective of the teachings of 6 sigma or lean the biggest thing that you have to get across to the stack holders that that you have to be open to change or you cannot have success. If a company, more importantly their employees are resistant to change then it is my opinion that you cannot be successful nor can you grow.

A lot of companies have their senior management change every 4 years or so and this in turn gives the company a chance to reassess business needs as well as how the organization should be structured. |

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| | RE: Change| Instructor Prondzinski | 7/13/2012 12:10:25 AM|
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| Tina and Courtney provide some additional thoughts regarding the stories of change. As we near conclusion of our discussion for the week, can anyone explain why ignoring the behavioral aspects of change amplifies the probability of failure for strategic change initiatives? Dr. Dale|

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| | RE: Change| Lisa Dixon | 7/13/2012 10:57:36 AM|
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| A change manager cannot ignore the behavior aspects of change because it is the employees that do the work. Communication and rallying for the employees to get involve in the change process is an essential part in change management. The employees must buy into the need for change. The change manager will need to be all the images of change to successfully lead the employees and organization through a successful change. If this is not done you may have key players in the change bailing out and others who will encourage resistance.|

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| | RE: Change| Carl Henning | 7/14/2012 2:26:58 PM|
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| Many times it seems that upper management is too removed from the “front line” employee base and miss some/most of the effect change has on their employees. In larger companies, when changes happen they affect 1000s of employees. Decisions about those employees are sometimes done from files and
impressions of them instead of hard facts concerning how they perform in their jobs.

In one instance I’m witnessed, a key employee was let go during a round of layoffs (resizing the company for an impending merger). He was so integral to the work of this group that he had to be rehired within 10 days of being let go. Obviously the decision to let him go in the first place was based on erroneous or incomplete information placed into his employee record by a superviser or higher. The effect of this was to lessen moral as it gave the impression that upper management had no understanding of who the individuals in the group were and what they did.

There are very few times that change will happen in a company that will be greeted enthusiatically by the employees of the company. Communication is an important part of employees accepting the change. But it is imperative that management present itself as a compitent partner during these times of change. If management cannot do that, then they hurt themselves at ever other turn during and beyond the process.|

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| | RE: Change| Lucas Shepard | 7/14/2012 5:28:02 AM|
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| Ignoring the behavioral aspects of change increases the chance of failure for strategic change initiatives because an organization that does this is not taking into account how the change will affect its people and what their response will be to the change. It is important for the people of an organization to welcome and feel part of the change in order for them to fully accept it and make it successful. Even the most well thought out change initiative can be doomed if the behavioral aspect is not taken into account. An organization must respect its people and listen to their feedback on these matters otherwise things can become very interesting, with a very good possibility of high turnover amongst employees and decreases morale.|

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| | Week 1 Summary| Instructor Prondzinski | 7/14/2012 7:56:13 AM|
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| Class,It is important to summarize our thoughts for the week. This week we addressed TCO A: Given that progressive and successful companies require their employees to embrace change, examine how changing work conditions impact the employees and TCO B: Given the inherent reality that all organizations must experience change in order to improve, demonstrate how “models” are used in Change Management for diagnosing an organization’s need for change. To this end we discussed four stories of change: the Hewlett-Packard Change Story, the IBM Change Story, the Kodak Change Story, and the McDonald’s Change Story.From these stories we learned different interests need to recognized and addressed during an organizational change, innovative changes often emerge from below in organizations, organizational change involves handling reactions of both internal and external stakeholders, and organizational changes occur in a competitive, international business environment. There are several other key points identified from these stories listed on page 9 of the text. Be sure to review these lessons.

Remember engaging with organizational change and producing successful, international change outcomes cannot be guaranteed. Introducing change may not even be desirable if the change idea turns out to be costly, marginal, irrelevant, or just plain wrong.As always the threads will be open until midnight Mountain time Sunday to complete your requirements. Thanks for a wonderful start to the class and I look forward to discussing the new issues with you in week 2.Regards,Dr. Dale|

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| | RE: Week 1 Summary| Jesus Pintado | 7/15/2012 10:28:46 AM|
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| Professor and class,
From the stories in this weeks discussions, I have learned the importance of internal and external stakeholder and the impact they have in decision making. I have also learned that change is good even when the organization may be doing well. Additionally, international competition also has an impact on organizational change and the way senior leadership evaluates their company. The stories helped me understand the need for senior leadership in deciding on what is best for the company through their employees and customers/clients.|

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| | RE: Week 1 Summary| Brian Dunnicliffe | 7/15/2012 12:59:22 PM|
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| I agree Jesus and great post. I would also add that I have learned that organizations must expect and anticipate change. With this they need to have plans which cover all the bases in order to effectively manage, implement and execute the change from the bottom to the top. This includes not only the steps towards implementing the new policies and practices but also addressing the “human side of change” as well in order to maximize support and compliance with the change.|

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| | RE: Week 1 Summary| Lucy Zubek | 7/14/2012 9:30:15 AM|
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| As we all agreed, there are many reasons why an individuals or groups would resist change. It is mainly driven by fear, fear of the unknown, fear of more work, fear of not understanding, fear of downsizing, fear of losing the job for any number of reasons, fear of not being able to cope with the change, etc. However, most individuals involved in change could have a lack of “specific behaviour traits needed to adapt easily to difficult changing circumstances”.

http://engaged-employees.blogspot.com/2009/06/engagement-productivity-at-risk-for.html|
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| | RE: Week 1 Summary| Clara Ofori-Mante | 7/14/2012 3:50:45 PM|
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| Very true Lucy, Employees behaviors does determine how they would handle any kind of organizational change. Just like the article you posted states ” employees who are engaged and focused are those that accept change well ans see it as a means to progress”|

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| | RE: Week 1 Summary| Carl Henning | 7/15/2012 5:55:26 AM|
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| Management practices like Total Quality Management can go a long way toward alleviating some of these fears. “In a TQM effort, all members of an organization participate in improving processes, products, services and the culture in which they work.” It is important (perhaps imperative) that management work with their employees if they want to create and atmosphere of productive change. This is not something that can be done while change is occuring, it must be done at all times. If the employee is involved in process improvements they will have a better understanding of the change that’s necessary to improve the company.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Total_quality_management|
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| | RE: Week 1 Summary| Tina Hoskie | 7/14/2012 10:23:51 AM|
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| A good definition of change is …. transformation or transition from one state, condition or phase to another. We all agree that change is inevitable.. We go thru change everyday.. in our personal lives, our work life and just in every day living.. Everyone is subject to change.. small businesses, big businesses included… Depending on the type of change.. it can be either good or bad.. Big organizations are always undergoing change, companies that downsize, may be considered good for the company(internally), but if they are laying off people (externally), it becomes a bad change for the people involved.I personally worked for several companies where they downsized and eliminated my job.

At first it was not to good of a change for me, but then I decided instead to look at the change in a more positive way because, as it turned out I found something better. So it is better to take a negative change and turn it into a positive. The same with companies, they change to make things for positive and good for the company as a whole. And it is about making sure those stockholders/ stakeholders are satisfied. Change can be either good or bad… it is entiriely on how you handle change and are able to make the right choices.|

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| | RE: Week 1 Summary| Lisa Dixon | 7/14/2012 2:38:27 PM|
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| I do agree that change can be transformational and or transitional. A company can never become complacent. It should always be aware of the internal and external pressure surrounding them. Change usually happens because of low returns or for more opportunities to grow. Change can be costly and risky for a company. It also comes with a great deal of uncertainty for employees that the change manger must be able to manage. Today changes within companies are happening faster than at any other time in history due to advancing technology. I don’t see it slowing down. So people will have to learn to be more flexible in their ability to change to survive this new era. |

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| | stories of change| Kitty Patterson | 7/14/2012 7:27:46 PM|
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| I thought that all mergers were a complete understanding and agreement of all party’s involved. The merger between HP and Compaq was very hard from the top all the way to the bottom. I also thought that the owner of a company would have controlling interest of the company and would have the last say about any and all important business matters. It is also strange to think that the controlling vote would talk and agree to going along with the merger to the place of convincing others to go along with the vote then all of a sudden change their mind over night. The question that comes to mind is what he would get out of convincing others to go along then change his mind in a matter of hours. A total turn around.|

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| | RE: stories of change| Rae Davis | 7/15/2012 2:45:36 AM|
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| Kitty, I thoughtthe same about mergers as well. to my understanding, a merger is an agreement between the involving companies where they negociate the terms of agreement. A takeover on the other hand, is where one company take the over the other company with them not having much control over the process.|

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| | McDonald’s Option2| Joshua Collier | 7/14/2012 9:05:05 PM|
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| The story in the book about McDonald’s decision to move to a healthier menu is a change that McDonald’s is continuing to develop. Recently, McDonald’s changed the makeup of one of the bestselling items on their menu, the happy meal. According to Jay McMIckle, the general manager of the local McDonald’s here is Great Falls, one out of every three meals includes at least one happy meal. The old happy meal included one entre item, one drink option, and one side item. The entre was either a hamburger, cheeseburger, or mcnuggets. The drink option included a soft drink, juice, and milk available in chocolate or regular verities.

The side option, which when I was a child only included french fries was modified within the last ten years to include an option for apple slices; however few parents chose this option. The new happy meal will now include both a much smaller portion of french fries and apple slices. This change resulted in a reduction to the calorie content of the happy meal as well as increasing the nutritional value. It also reduces stress on parent who might be struggling with getting their children to make healthier meal decisions. As a final bonus it now makes healthy eating a choice McDonald’s has made instead of an options for parents; this act show excellent corporate responsibility.http://www.mcdonalds.com/us/en/changingtogether.htmlMcMickel, J. (2012, July 11). Questions on McDonald’s Changes. (J. Collier, Interviewer)|

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| | Stories of change.| Ikaika Genegabus | 7/15/2012 11:15:50 PM|
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| HP is one of those companies that had a lot of changes. After the merger with Compaq, HP has made some organizational changes that fit in with the lessons that the textbook mentions. The text book mentions that different interests need to be recognized and addressed during organizational change. This was clearly evident when they appointed executives to support key markets. HP has markets like China and India that are very crucial to HP. By having these executives, it make sure that all of the interests are being addressed when it comes to support in the key markets.

http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/press/2011/110613b.html|
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| | My Response| Yadean Sum | 7/15/2012 11:19:03 PM|
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| Learning Point One: “Different interests need to be recognized and addressed during an organizational change” I believe everyone has a different goal in life and they work in order to achieve those goals. Even if an employee does not share the same goals as the company it is in there best interest to research what these goals are and work toward helping them achieve them. Not only will this increase employee satisfaction but a company will probably see far more productivity out of them once they realize that they have a future with that company.

Learning Point Two: “Communication strategy need to be designed for internal and external groups” To implement successful change a company needs to make sure everyone is in the loop. Some form of consistent reliable communication needs to be in place so that the employees can set there mind at ease and work to ward a more clear goal and so that the customer knows that this change is for the best and they are not risking anything for this change. Without that no change would work.

Learning Point Three: “Change in and of itself is not necessarily good for a company; careful assessment is needed pf the relevance and likely success of a proposed change” Change should always go through some form of intense review before a company decided to act upon it. Any change major or minor can have massive effects on the success of a company.|


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