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The Holocaust Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Ib English: Macro

I’m going to discuss the following question: How and why is a social group represented in a particular way? I’m going to answer this question based on the book ‘Maus’ written by Art Spiegelman. I’ve chosen this question because I thought it was quite interesting why the author uses animals for different social groups instead of just using humans. Points of focus: * How did Art Spiegelman portray different social groups * Why did he chose for this method * Explain the choice for the animals (like mice to represent the Jewish people.) Written task 2 How and why is a social group represented in a particular way? In ‘Maus’ the author chose to use animals to represent different social…

Maus essay

I Maus by Art spiegelman shows imagery. It resembles the quote from Hitler “The Jews are undoubtedly a race, but they are not human”, and shows that the different groups of people have essential characteristics that are represented by the animals they are portrayed as in the book. This just shows how low Germans are towards the Jews. In the comic book of Maus, Vladek tells some horrible stories of when he was in the holocaust. Artie (his son) is very interested in the way the holocaust was and how his father and gone through it when he was younger. In one of the clips it shows Vladek‘s number that he was given to be represented by instead of his…

Nazi Germany’s discrimination against the Jews throughout World War II

As a result of anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany, a system of violent suppression and control emerged that ultimately took the lives of an estimated 6 million Jewish people Anti-Semitism is an opposition to, prejudice against, or intolerance of Semitic people, most commonly Jews. Anti-Semitism has existed throughout history, since Israel’s dispersion in 70 AD. In every land in which the Jews have lived, they have been threatened, violated and murdered, century after century. After Germany’s defeat in World War I, many Germans found it hard to accept their defeat. These Germans connived a theory that the citizens at home had betrayed them, “especially laying blame on Jews and Marxists in Germany for undermining the war effort” (http://www. historyplace. com/worldwar2/riseofhitler/ends. htm)….

Dehumanization of the Jews

Dehumanization is the process of making a person less human by taking away the important things in their life and what makes them who they are; not only the material things but their ideas and morals as well. The Nazi’s dehumanized millions and millions of Jews during the Holocaust. In Elie Wiesel’s recollection of his experience in the German’s concentration camps, he explained how brutal the Nazi’s could be, how they could take a person’s life away in the matter of seconds, and how they change a person’s outlook on life entirely. The Jews were dehumanized from the very beginning of the Holocaust and only grew to be worse. Dehumanization is the process of making a person less human by…

Corrie Ten Boom: a Feisty Christian Soldier

The Holocaust is modernly viewed as one of the greatest examples of human suppression and discrimination. However, many heroes and defenders against the Holocaust remain largely uncredited by the general public. One of the unacknowledged heroes, Corrie Ten Boom, is “[an] indomitable spirit.. , not just a ‘sweet little grandmother’, but a two-fisted old Dutch soldier for Christ” (“Corrie Ten Boom” U*X*L). Through her unshakable faith in God, Corrie Ten Boom was able to valiantly aid the Holocaust victims in their most dire time of need despite the constant danger of being captured. Ten Boom’s generosity was cultured from her religious background and loving family, who was always supportive and equally charitable (“Corrie Ten Boom” Encyclopedia). As Ten Boom was…

Inhumanity in Night

Elie Wiesel’s Night is about what the Holocaust did, not just to the Jews, but also by extension, to humanity. People all over the world were devastated by this atrocious act, and there are still people today who have not overcome the effects. One example of the heinous acts of the Germans that stands out occurs at the end of the war, when Wiesel and the rest of the camp of Buna are being forced to transfer to Gleiwitz. This transfer is a long, arduous, and tiring journey for all who are involved. The weather is painfully cold, and snow fell heavily; the distance was greater than most people today will even dream of walking. The huge mass of people…