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Teacher – school Essay

I dedicate this dissertation to my beloved parents Mr. and Mrs. Muwonge Mukasa (R. I. P) for their parental love, zeal and the guidance given to me in my early years of academic life, to the Rt. Rev. Bishop Joseph Anthony Zziwa for his paternal love, spiritual, moral, and fiscal support, to Sr. Elizabeth Achieng without whose dear motherly care, love, concern, material and financial support I never would have achieved this degree.

To my dear maternal uncle Professor Ignatius Kakande for his parental love, care, concern and financial support, to my dearest brothers and sisters, for their support and encouraging words all through my studies, and to all the members of the Little Sisters of St. Francis of Assisi in Central Region, who despite their meager financial resources, knew the value of education and sacrificed so much for me. iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to acknowledge the contribution of the following people who have assisted me in a special way in carrying out this research work.

First and foremost, I would like to extend my sincere and hearty gratitude to my two very supportive supervisors, namely, Dr. Oonyu Joseph and Dr. Anthony Mugagga Muwagga, for their critical reviews, expert advice, and regular availability to me throughout the course of my research work. I would also wish to thank the Regional Superior of Central region, Rev. Sr. Jane Frances Nakafeero, and the council members, for giving me an opportunity to pursue further studies and for financing my studies. My sincere thanks are also extended to the Rt. Rev. Bishop Joseph Anthony Zziwa for his fatherly love and encouraging pieces of advice, and to Rev.

Fr. Oscar M. Ssuuna for his brotherly advice and critical review of my research work. I also extend a sincere thank you to Rev. Fr. Dr. Charles L. Mubiru, Rev. Fr. Henry Kasasa, Rev. Fr. Nicholas Kiruma, Bro. Anselm Nsemereirwe, Mr. Peter M. Ssenkusu, Dr. Enon, Musuubire Anthony, Mr. Walimbwa Michael, and Rev. Fr. Hilary R. Munyaneza, for their untiring efforts to ensure the completion of my dissertation by assisting me get the required information. I cannot forget my exemplary lecturer Dr. F. E. K Bakkabulindi for his great assistance and excellent academic pieces of advice.

I owe a special debt of gratitude to Rev. Fr. Simon Peter Kyambadde, Rev. Fr. Paul Kafeero, Rev. Fr. Achilles S. Mayanja, Rev. Sr. Elizabeth Achieng, Rev. Sr. Immaculate Nabukalu, Rev. Sr. Agatha M. Muggwanya, Bro. J. Bosco Ssenkabirwa, Prof. Ignatius Kakande, Prof. Mathias Ggingo, Dr. Maria Barifaijo, Dr. Beatrice Sekabembe, Dr. Kaseneene E. Kaahwa J. Taddeo, Ssenkooto John, Mr. Kuloba Paul, iv Aunt Berna, the sisters in Iganga and Namilyango communities, and Mr. and Mrs. Ntaanda Fred whose all round support and encouraging words gave so much to the completion of this work.

May God bless and reward them all. I also acknowledge all the support given to me by all the lecturers in the East African Institute of Higher Education (School of Education, Makerere University) and by my classmates of Master of Arts Degree in Education Management and Administration 2007/2008 – 2008/2009. I cannot forget the Brothers at Lamennais House, Makerere, my research assistants together with all the teachers, head teachers, deputy head teachers, members of BOGs, heads of disciplinary committees, and local government and educational officials who assisted me in gathering data from the field.

Last but not least, I am very grateful to Mrs. Kamya Rose at the photocopier and Stella for their sisterly advice and assistance and all the Librarians in School of Education for their readiness to serve me at the issuing desk in the Library. To Dr. Beraho, Grand Hostel members, and my community members for the conducive residential services they gave me throughout my studies. May God bless you all. TABLE OF CONTENTS v Declaration ………………………………………………………………………………. (i) Approval…………………………………………………………………………………. (ii) Dedication ……………………………………………………………………… ………. (iii) Acknowledgement……………………………………………………………………….

(iv) Table of contents……………………………………………… ………………………… (vi) List of tables …………………………………………………………………………….. (x) List of figures …………………………………………………………………….. …… (xii) Abstract …………………………………………………………………………… …… (xii) CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION………………………………………. …………1 1. 0 1. 2 1. 3 1. 4 1. 5A 1. 5B 1. 6 1. 7 Introduction……. ……………………………………………………………. ….. 1 Statement of the problem ………………………………………………………… 7 Purpose……………………………………………………………………………9 Objectives…………………………………………………………………………9 Research Questions ………………………………………………………………9 Research Hypotheses…………………………………………………………….. 10 Scope of the study ……………………………………………………………….

10 Significance of the study……………………………………………. …………… 11 CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW………………………….. ……….. ……13 2. 0 Introduction ………………………………………………………….. ………….. 13 vi 2. 1 2. 2 2. 3 Theoretical Review………………………………………………. …………… …. 13 Conceptual Framework …………………………………………. ……. …………14 Review of Related Literature…………………………………. …………………. 16 2. 3. 1 Teachers? Code of conduct and teacher performance ………. …………………… 17 2. 3. 2 2. 3. 3 Teachers? Commitment and performance …………………. ……………………. 21 Teachers? perception of the code of conduct ……………. ………………………25 CHAPTER THREE: METHODOLOGY…………………………………………

……29 3. 0 3. 1 3. 2 3. 2. 1 3. 2. 2 3. 2. 3 3. 3 3. 3. 1 3. 3. 2 3. 3. 3 3. 3. 4 3. 4 3. 4. 1 3. 4. 2 3. 5 Introduction ……………………………………………………………………. …29 Research Design……………………………….. ……………………. ……………29 Populations and Sample………………………………………………. …….. ……30 Population……………………………………………………………. ……….. …. 30 Sample and sample size……………………………………………. ………….. …30 Sampling strategies………………………………………………. ….. …………… 32 Data collection instruments…………………………………………. ……………. 34 Questionnaires………………………………………………………. ……………. 34 Interviews …………………………………………………………. ……………… 35 Documentary study…………………………………………………..

……………35 Focus group discussion…………………………………………………. …………36 Data quality control………………………………………………………………. 37 Validity……………………………………………………………………………37 Reliability…………………………………………………………………………38 Data analysis……………………………………………………. ………………… 39 vii 3. 5. 1 3. 5. 2 3. 6 Quantitative data analysis…………. ………….. …………………………………. 39 Qualitative data analysis…………………………………………. ………………. 41 Procedure and Ethical consideration……………………………………………. 42 CHAPTER FOUR: DATA PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION ………………. ………………. 43 4. 0 4. 1 4. 2 Introduction…………………………………………………………………………

43 Background Information …………………………………………………………43 Teachers? professionalism………………………………………………… ……… 46 4. 2. 1 Influence of the code of conduct and teacher performance………………………………. 47 4. 3 Teacher performance…………………………………………………………. ….. 57 4. 3. 1 Planning………………………………………………………………………. ….. 57 4. 3. 2 Teaching………………………………………………………………………. …. 58 4. 3. 3 Assessment…………………………………………………………………….. …. 60 4. 4 4. 4. 1 4. 5 4. 6 4. 7 4. 8 Statistical analysis of the teachers? code of conduct and teacher performance……63 Hypothesis One……………………………………………………….. …………. 63 Teachers?

commitment on teacher performance……………………….. ………… 64 Hypothesis Two…………………………………………………………… ………80 Teachers? perception of the teachers? code of conduct on teacher performance…. 81 Hypothesis Three…………………………………………………………… …….. 91 CHAPTER FIVE: DISCUSSION, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATI….. 92 5. 1 5. 2 Introduction………………………………………………………………………. 92 Research Hypothesis One…………………………………………………………92 viii 5. 3 5. 4 5. 5 5. 6 Research hypothesis Two…………………………………………………………98 Research hypothesis Three……………………………………………….. …….. 103 Study Conclusion …………………………………………. ……………………. 109 Recommendations………………………………………………………………. 110

REFERENCES………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 112 APPENDICES Appendix A: Questionnaire for Secondary School Teachers in Busiro County, Wakiso District……………………………………………………………………………… 120 Appendix B: Interview guide for secondary school head teachers and their deputies on teacher professionalism and teacher performance……………… 126 Appendix C: Questions for the teachers? focus group discussions on teacher professionalism and teacher commitment…………………………..

127 Appendix D: Structured Interview for members of the Board of Governors and District Educational Officials on teacher professionalism and teacher performance…………………………………………………………………. 129 Appendix E: Budget for the Study……………………………………….. ……………132 Appendix F: Frequency Tables…………………………………………. ……. ………. 142 Appendix G: Map of Wakiso District…………………………………….. …. …. …….. 143 LIST OF TABLES ix Table 3. 1: Table 3. 2: Table 3. 3: Table 4:1 Table 4. 2: Table 4. 3: Table 4. 4: Table 4. 5: Table 4. 6: Nature of the sampled schools…………………………………

…………. 31 The target and actual study population………………………… …………32 Documents availed by schools………………………………. …… ………36 Background information of teacher respondents…………………………. 44 Summary of teachers? self rating on the code of conduct……….. …. ……47 Summary of teachers? responses on planning………………….. …. …….. 57 Summary of teachers? responses on teaching …….. …………………….. 58 Summary of teachers? responses on assessment…………………… …….. 60 Pearson? s Correlation coefficient on the code of conduct and teacher performance ………………………………………………………63 Table 4. 7: Table 4. 8: Summary of teachers?

responses on commitment…………………… ……64 Head teachers and deputies? responses on how teachers? commitment can be enhanced…………………………………………….. 69 Table 4. 9: Respondents? views on how they maintain the pride their teachers have in them………………………………………………….. …74 Table 4. 10: Pearson? s Correlation coefficient between teacher commitment and teacher performance…………………………………………………. 80 Table 4. 11: Table 4. 12: Teachers? perceptions of the teachers? code of conduct…………. ………. 81 Teachers reactions when a fellow teacher acts outside the code of conduct……………………………………………………………88 x Table 4. 13:

Teachers opinion on giving indefinite suspension to teachers who violate the code of conduct…………………………………. ………. 89 Table 4. 14: T-test results on teacher performance by positive and negative attitudes…………………………………………………. ………91 xi LIST OF FIGURES Figure 4. 1: Ways head teachers use in handling teachers who break the teachers? code……………………………………………….. ….. ……55 Figure 4. 2: Head teachers and Deputies responses on how the code of conduct enhances teachers? commitment………………………. …………68 Figure 4. 3: Head teachers and deputy head teachers? response on factors responsible for low teacher commitment…………………………….

……71 Figure 4. 4: Respondents? views on measures used to ensure teachers? dedication, cooperation and willingness to their duties……………….. …72 Figure 4. 5: Figure 4. 6: BOG? s indication of the number of times they motivate teachers….. ……77 B. O. G? s opinion on the teaching methods needed for use by teachers to ensure effective learning……………………………….. ……. 78 Figure 4. 7: Teachers? perception of the important and most lived core value of the code………………………………………………………….. 82 Figure 4. 8: Figure 4. 9: Teachers? responses on the various ways of strengthening each other……84 Whether it is common to dedicate one?

s time in attending to one? s duties. 90 xii ABSTRACT The study aimed at examining the influence of teachers? professionalism on teacher performance in Busiro County secondary schools, Wakiso District. The study was guided by the following objectives: to establish the influence of the code of conduct (that is; respect, integrity, honesty, trust, fairness, service, equality) on teachers? performance in secondary schools, the perception of teachers towards the code of conduct in secondary schools and to establish the effect of commitment in terms of planning, assessment, and teaching on teachers?

performance in Busiro County secondary schools, Wakiso District. The study employed a combination of both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The quantitative approach used was a questionnaire and the qualitative approaches included use of interviews, focus group discussion, and documentary analysis. It utilized a cross-sectional sample survey design, which was largely descriptive and qualitative in nature. The study made the following findings: The teachers? code does not have a significant relationship with teacher performance. The study also reveals that commitment does not have a significant relationship with teacher performance.

The study also reveals that majority of teachers especially those in government and denominational private schools are committed to their work while those in for profit- making schools are less committed and this greatly impacts on their performance. The study further revealed that teachers have a positive attitude towards the teachers? code of conduct. xiii The study concluded that the results indicated that the code of conduct and teacher performance were not significantly correlated because it was well beyond the benchmark sig meaning that the code of conduct does not have a positive effect on teacher performance.

The study also concluded that teachers who act more professionally and are aware of their obligation and duty to the teachers? code of conduct do perform well both in and outside class (extra-curricular activities). The study also concluded that teachers? performance is greatly associated with adherence to the teacher? s code of conduct. The study also concluded that teacher commitment and teacher performance were not significantly correlated because the results were well beyond the benchmark sig.

meaning that teacher commitment does not have a positive effect on teacher performance. The study concluded that teacher perception in terms of positive and negative attitudes affects teacher performance. In addition, a big number of respondents have a positive attitude towards the code of conduct for teachers. The study also concludes that what seems to be poor perception is a result of other factors such as poor remuneration, nature of the school and the implied school leadership and students. It was therefore recommended that different authorities including teacher

training institutions, Ministry of Education and Sports, schools and denominational education secretariates should avail to teachers personal copies of teachers? code of conduct. Furthermore, in order to enhance teachers? knowledge and perception of the code, there should be regular and refresher programmes in form of seminars, workshops among others through which teachers are educated on the value of behaving professionally, and lastly, the study recommends that in order to enhance teachers? commitment, emphasis should be laid on the need for teachers to act professionally.

This could be done by applying the various remunerating aspects such as xiv improving on teacher working conditions, improving on teacher rewards and other related benefits like the fringe benefits. xv CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION 1. 0 Introduction Teachers are an important factor in determining the quality of education that children receive. Their professionalization therefore has been a centre of much concern among educators and researchers (Nkwanga, 1992). Its importance is not only for repute, differentiation from members of other professions, but in a sociological sense, as a form of social control.

Therefore, for an educational institution to excel, it must focus on the quality, competence, knowledge and commitment of the teaching staff, which are actually embedded in their teaching profession code of conduct. Though professionalism is the ultimate goal of all professions, poverty, poor remuneration and poor training at times constrain its attainment. There are many factors which influence teacher professionalism such as attitude of the different education stake holders towards the teacher, gender, age and duration of service. These all have a bearing to the teachers?

professionalism and the implied performance in and outside class. 1. 1 Background to the study Before the advent of colonialism there was no school to train teachers and there were no trained teachers (Ssekamwa, 1997). Most of the teaching was done informally at home, in clan meetings or in peer gatherings (Roscoe, 1915). And so in the traditional African society, teacher professionalism was built in their societal norms and prescriptions especially the values that were espoused at the time such as respect, honesty, integrity, trust among others (Muwagga, 2006).

With the coming of the missionaries between 1877 and 1879, formal 1 education begun though the teaching was being carried out under verandahs (Ssekamwa, 1999). Later, missionaries established schools which necessitated the establishment of teacher training schools to train teachers who would become professionals and these were equipped with both content and pedagogical skills (Ssekamwa, 1997). A professional is a person who has received training in theory and practice in a discipline for a long period of time and usually constrained by a code of conduct.

The curriculum which basically constituted the 3Rs (that is; Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic) was designated not only to create a new class of elites but also religiously adherent citizens (Nkwanga, 1992). The missionaries used a recruiting system of pupil-teacher to become their assistants in teaching but only those whose personalities seemed ideal for exemplary conduct in the community and had grasped some aspects of the 3Rs were recruited. This was the humble beginning of the emphasis of teachers? conduct in Uganda which underlies this study.

As Wandira (1971) observed about early recruitment, “Each missionary could make an effort to further the spiritual, mental and pastoral training of such individual workers who by grace… need special training for the work of the ministry”. The early recruitment and routine of teachers both in the school and outside it was monitored by his conduct. The missionary view of teacher-professional conduct was gauged against the Bible and Clergymanship (Nkwanga, 1992). A teacher who could avoid intoxicating drinks, got married in church and regularly attended church services, such teachers?

works could be appreciated. Despite this emphasis on the puritanical conduct of teachers, less emphasis was put on content and pedagogy. 2 In 1925, a department of education was established in Uganda to oversee education in the protectorate and the colonial government then started normal schools to train teachers. Since most of these schools were run by missionaries, puritanical conduct was emphasized among teachers and those who found it difficult to comply with these standards found their way to private schools (Ssekamwa & Lugumba, 1973).

The pre-independence era in Uganda? s education system therefore witnessed a high degree of teacher? s discipline and high respectability in regard to the core values such as; integrity, trust, equality, service, fairness, honesty and respect in their profession (Mamdan, 1976). Historically, therefore, one can note that in Uganda teachers? professionalism has developed over the years. The 1950s saw the development of teaching as a profession as noted by Ssekamwa (1999).

Those who took up the profession became professional teachers and these came to be termed as persons who have undergone formal training in a Primary Teachers Colleges (PTCs), National Teachers Colleges (NTCs) or a University College (Ssekamwa, 2000). Teacher professionalism therefore became a major source of contention between the different stakeholders in Uganda (Muwagga, 2006), and due to the growing autonomy that was given to educators, it has remained one of the most influential attributes of education today (Ilukena, 1999).

Therefore, teacher professionalism has had relevant significance in education and thus emphasizes both academic and professional obligations (Ssekamwa, 1997). Upon attainment of independence in 1962, the Government of Uganda took education as one of its priorities to create a pool of manpower and accelerate economic development (Wandira, 1971). The training of teachers was intensified at all levels. Uganda had graduate teachers 3 from Makerere University, diploma holders from NTCs and Grade III teachers with a certificate in education from Primary Teachers? Colleges.

It can also be noted that the independent governments in Uganda have emphasized the secularization of education through the Teaching Service Commission (TSC) and the legacy of puritanical emphasis on teachers? conduct still survives in these schools. Society expects teachers to be exemplary but much as this is so, it is unfortunate that the liberalization of education in Uganda in the early 1990s, and the increase in private secondary schools in post independence Uganda has eroded most of the core values espoused in the code of conduct for teachers (Nkwanga, 1992).

Hence, this has led teachers to develop a negative attitude towards the code thereby leading many to have a low perception, and thus resulting into many problems such as teachers? disrespect of their profession, hence leading to poor students? performance, indiscipline, unending strikes, truancy and other delinquent behaviors of students among others (Nsereko, 1997). There is an increased report of dysfunctional plus poor job performance by most teachers in Uganda and the argument and blame is placed on poor professional conduct by some teachers (Emojong, 2008).

It is from the liberalization of education that allegations that the existence of private secular secondary schools and government secondary schools and those which are denominational but government aided coupled with lose control by the Ministry of Education has had an impact on teachers? professionalism and the implied performance (Muwagga, 2006). By professionalism it is meant the basis of our contract with society and this embeds in it a professional code of ethics or conduct. According to Wandira (1986), teacher professionalism.

4 means a teacher adhering to the teaching code of conduct. Therefore, teacher professionalism affects the role of the teacher and his or her pedagogy, which in turn affects the student? s ability to learn effectively. Teacher training emphasizes both academic and professional obligations whereby the professional obligations imply teacher? s professionalism (Ssekamwa, 1997). Teachers? professionalism has developed over the years. On the other hand today teachers? professionalism is referred to as the teachers?

Code of conduct (Ilukena, 1999). By teachers? code of conduct one refers to principals, values, standards, or rules of behavior that guide the decisions, procedures and systems of a school in which teachers work and in a way that (a) contributes to the welfare of its key stakeholders, and (b) respects the rights of all constituents affected by its operations (Wandira, 1986). It could also refer to the expected professional standards of behaviour of members of a profession governed by professional code of conduct (Nkwanga, 1992).

Professionalism has been found out to be the most challenging approach to mandated content while motivating, engaging, and inspiring aspect of preparing new teachers (Freidson, 1994). Talbert and McLaughlin (1996) define professionalism as “the internalized beliefs regarding professional obligations, attributes, interactions, attitudes, values, and role behaviors. ” Professionalism means that teachers fully accept the challenges of teaching which are reflected in the three primary indicators of professionalism namely; responsibility, respect and risk taking (Hyland, 2002). Teachers? professionalism as per this study is taken to be teachers?

adherence to the code of conduct, teachers? commitment, and teachers? perception of the code of conduct and so, by code of conduct one refers to the core values which include; respect, honesty, integrity, trust, equality, service, fairness, and tolerance, teachers? perception refers to 5 teachers? attitude (that is positive and negative) towards the teachers? code of conduct and commitment refers to dedication, willingness, cooperation, voluntarism, belongingness, excitement, and pride. The researcher also adopts the International dictionary? s meaning of a „teacher? and then „perception?.

A teacher is “one who teaches or instructs learners to acquire knowledge or skills usually with the imparting of necessary incidental information and the giving of incidental help and encouragement”. On the other hand, perception is a sensory impression or mental image derived from past experiences (Namugwanya, 2006). As per this study, perception refers to the positive and negative attitude of teachers, towards the core values of the code of conduct for teachers. Performance on the other hand refers to how well or badly an individual, organization, group or institution does something or some task (Nampa, 2006).

On the other hand, Otemo (2004) defines performance as the consistent ability to produce results over prolonged periods of time and in a variety of assignments. Thus, this research treats job performance of teachers as planning, teaching, and assessment which are reflected in setting objectives, evaluating lessons, organization, extra duties, time management, and lesson planning, preparing schemes of work, creating a conducive environment, using various methods, strategies, and ensuring discipline and records of work and lastly giving students exercises, examinations, quizzes, and debates.

This study therefore viewed job performance of teachers as an outcome of teachers? professionalism and thus invoked two Theories of Teleologism which begun with the philosophies of Aristotle (348BC) and Deontologism propounded by Kant (1724-1804) (Russell, 1996). The Theory of Teleologism implies duty and moral obligation being inherent 6 in one? s actions. Moral obligation presupposing an obligation to perform an act because that act fulfills one?

s code of conduct, cultural dictates, religion or professional obligations, These are in lieu of respect, integrity, equality, trust, service, honesty and fairness. On the other hand by Deontologism, it implies an end or good which lies both in the duty, spiritual dictates tradition and conventions of society (Gonsalves, 1989). Teacher performance in Busiro County, Wakiso District is observed to be going down. Muzaale (2008) reports that there is poor performance of secondary teachers in Busiro County, Wakiso District which is reflected in the poor results of the students they are teaching.

Nakabugo (2008) reports on the poor performance of teachers that is as a result of their late coming to school thus leading to students missing their morning lessons, having little time for consultation and obtaining poor grades. She attributes this poor performance to teachers? absenting themselves from schools and hardly giving monthly tests and continuous assignments to students. The same author has further asserts that most head teachers are never in offices to execute their duties; defilement rate by some teachers is at its pick and use of vulgar language before students in class.

Emojong, (2008) & Miti (2008) reports that teachers do not give exercises to students, teachers miss classes without strong reasons and are irregular at school. The district reports 2006, 2007, and 2008 also reveal that there is persistent poor performance in examinations, staff turnover and students? indiscipline. 1. 2 Statement of the problem Teacher performance is looked at as one of the ways in which academic excellence in schools can be enhanced, motivates students to work hard, reflects teachers?

competence and brings 7 out teachers as agents of social change (Manana, 2005). Unfortunately, Nampa (2006) comments that the performance of teachers has sunk, and Wakiso district reports (2007) and Waiswa (2009) comment that students are often left without being given class work, they are defiled, teachers absent themselves from school duties, come late and leave early and head teachers are hardly seen in their offices executing their duties.

This failure to fully embrace their duties is breeding several negative results such as low and poor academic performance, student indiscipline, and student turn-over. In turn, this is affecting teachers? adherence to their code of conduct, their attitude towards the core values of the code of conduct, their dedication, willingness, voluntarism, belongingness, cooperation, excitement and pride. If the current situation is not urgently addressed, it may increase immorality that may eventually paralyze the profession of teachers.

While several sources such as news articles and education stakeholders are reporting a decline in teachers? performance in different parts of the country, none is looking at teachers? professionalism as a likely factor that may be playing a major role. This concern therefore drives the researcher to examine how teacher professionalism influences teachers? performance in Busiro County secondary schools, Wakiso District. 1. 3 Purpose The purpose of the study was to establish the influence of teachers?

professionalism on teacher performance in Busiro County secondary schools, Wakiso District. 1. 4 Objectives The study aimed at achieving the following specific objectives; 1. To establish the relationship between the teachers? code of conduct and teachers? performance in Busiro County, secondary schools, Wakiso District. 8 2. To establish the relationship between teachers? commitment in terms of planning, assessment, and teaching and teachers? performance in Busiro County secondary schools in, Wakiso District. 3.

To find out the perception of teachers towards the teachers? code of conduct in Busiro County, secondary schools, Wakiso District 1. 5A Research Questions The study was guided by the following research questions: 1. How does the teachers? code of conduct contribute to teacher performance in Busiro County secondary schools, Wakiso District? 2. How does teachers? commitment in terms of planning, assessment, and teaching contribute to teacher performance in Busiro County secondary schools, Wakiso District? 3. What is the teachers? perception of the teachers?

code of conduct in Busiro County secondary schools, Wakiso District? 1. 5B Research Hypotheses 1. The teachers? code of conduct has a positive relationship with teacher performance in Busiro County secondary schools, Wakiso District. 2. Teachers? commitment in terms of planning, assessment, and teaching a positive relationship with District. 3. Teachers? perception of the teachers? code of conduct affects teacher performance in Busiro County secondary schools, Wakiso District. teacher performance in Busiro County secondary schools, Wakiso.

9 1. 6 Scope of the study The study was carried out in Wakiso District, Busiro County secondary schools. It focused on establishing how the teachers code of conduct, commitment influence teacher performance, and teachers? perception of the teachers? code of conduct. The District is bordered with Luwero District in the North, Mukono District in the West, Kalangala District in the South, Kampala District in the South-West, Mubende District in the East, and Kiboga District in the North-East (See Appendix VII).

The study focused on the core values of the code of conduct, attitude of teachers towards the core teacher values and commitment. For teacher performance, the study focused on planning, teaching and assessment. The respondents targeted were head teachers, deputy head teachers, classroom teachers, and heads of disciplinary committees, local government and education officials in charge of teachers and members of the Boards of Governors (BOGs). 1. 7 Significance of the study.

The study was to be of help to a number of people namely: the Ministry of Education and Sports (MoES), District Educational Officials, BOG, teachers, head teachers, and other related stakeholders. The MoES officials and district education officials it was hoped were to benefit from the study findings in a number of ways namely: they will have benchmarks for the effective and efficient supervision of their teachers, put in place counseling services, repost and punish misguide teachers exposed by these findings and hence improve the quality of teachers and education.

10 The members of the Board of Governors will realize the importance of teacher professionalism in enhancing teacher performance and hence put measures in place that will help teachers love and respect their profession all of which will help gloom professionally responsible teachers. It was also hoped that the study would draw teachers? .


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