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Support independence in the tasks of daily living Essay

1. Understand principles for supporting independence in the tasks of daily living 1.1 Explain how individuals can benefit from being as independent as possible in the tasks of daily living Active participation promotes independence in the tasks of daily living as this gives the client the confidence and independence needed to complete tasks by themselves without the support of others. Daily living tasks may affect those depending on their culture or background, as what someone may have been brought up believing, may not necessarily be accepted as the general view of society within Great Britain in these current times. I would identify suitable opportunities for an individual to learn or practice skills for daily living by providing a wide range of activities. I would observe/monitor their skills to identify what they can/can’t do, and also listen to them and ask any questions about what they would like to do.

It is important to clarify the role and responsibilities for providing support in order to ensure that all codes of conduct, professional boundaries and legalities are upheld. 1.2 Explain how active participation promotes independence in the tasks of daily living Independence gives someone a feeling of control over their life, People feel more comfortable, safe and reassured when they can do things for themselves and this also helps to uphold their self esteem and well being Individuals can benefit from being as independent as possible in the tasks of daily living as it depicts that people having the same level of choice, control and freedom in their daily lives as any other person 1.3 Describe how daily living tasks may be affected by an individual’s culture or background Carrying out our daily living tasks can be affected by our culture and background. For example, if a person has been used to having things done for them such as cooking and cleaning, then they may be reluctant to do these tasks for themselves.

On the other hand, if a person has been used to doing things for themselves without the help of others, then they may feel more inclined to want to continue to do so. Maybe the person has struggled financially and had to be very careful with money, leading to careful meal planning to reduce waste, perhaps using leftovers to provide another meal. Repairing worn clothing instead of throwing it away is a practice common to some people who have had little money to spare to buy new items. 1.4 Explain the importance of providing support that respects the individual’s culture and preferences The background, culture, faith or sexuality of the person I care for may be different from my own. These factors may influence how they want to be cared for. I’ll need to consider these factors if I want to share a home with the person I care for, particularly if they are to live in a care home or be looked after by care workers.

The care home or home care staff should be aware of the person’s needs. If the person you care for has a different culture or faith from yours, you’ll need to consider how they worship or pray, their personal routine and the importance of objects or symbols to them. If you’re unfamiliar with their customs, traditions, rituals or needs, it may be useful to do some research. In some cultures, caring is traditionally kept in the family or between close family friends. While this should be respected, it’s important that people know what help is available to them. Local social services and carers’ groups can help and offer advice. If the person I care for has a different background from my own, it’s important not to impose my views on them, as this could create tension and conflict. Worship and prayer

The religion of the person you look after may require them to worship in a particular way. They may need: •a particular time to pray
•a particular space for prayer (for example, Muslims must pray facing Mecca) •suitable clothing and any religious objects or symbols, such as a holy book or head covering Religious objects or symbols

Each faith has its own symbols or objects, such as the Sikh turban, Jewish skull cap or Catholic rosary beads. These should be treated with respect and not removed without consent. Washing facilities may also be required as Muslims may want to wash in running water before praying. Hair care

Hair care is an important part of many cultural groups and faiths. For example, Jewish women may want to wear a wig, and some Sikh men may wear their hair coiled and wrapped under a turban. Privacy and appearance

If you or the person you care for are part of a particular religion, tell anyone who helps out with caring (such as a professional care worker) so they can dress appropriately when visiting your home. Let them know if they need to cover parts of their body or head with a veil, or wear salwar kameez/kurta pyjama (tunic and trousers, worn with a scarf for women), a kippah/yarmulkah or hat. Meals

Mealtimes are important in most religions or cultures. You may already be aware of the strict preparation of foods under Islamic halal or Jewish kosher rules. Catholics usually don’t eat meat on Fridays. The person you care for may also have important cultural food preferences, such as vegetarianism or veganism. Language

You may care for someone who speaks a different language from you or uses sign language. While you may be able to learn a new language over time, try to ensure they have someone who can communicate fluently with them so that they know what is happening and can have a say in their own care. Tell social services about the language needs of the person you care for, so they can provide someone to translate or communicate in sign language. If the person lives in residential care, check that information is available in their language. Leisure

People usually want contact with others from their own cultural or religious groups, and being ill or having a disability shouldn’t stop this. Having access to local, cultural or religious communities, cultural events, newspapers, radio and TV channels can give people a sense of identity and help them feel part of the wider community. Ask the person you care for if they would like to get involved in their community – for example, attending religious services.

Sexuality
The person you care may want to be involved with a community related to their sexuality. Find out if there are lesbian, gay or bisexual groups in your area, if they are of interest to them. As with religious or cultural beliefs, it’s important not to make assumptions about someone’s sexual preferences. 1.5 Describe how to identify suitable opportunities for an individual to learn or practise skills for daily living Provide a wide range of activities and observe/monitor their skills to identify what they can/can’t do. Listen to them or ask them about what they would like to do.

1.6 Explain why it is important to establish roles and responsibilities for providing support For any activity to happen a number of things need to happen. For running a care home successfully there are lots of things that need to be done, for example, medication need to be given out, people need to be washed and fed, people need to have their clothes washed, their beds changed and so on. A manager will make a list of all the tasks and then make sure that the workers know what each one is responsible for doing so that all the work is done. This needs to be done, otherwise some tasks will never get done because they are less popular or people will just assume that someone else will do all the work. There is a saying ‘Everybody’s business is nobody’s business’ because nobody will take responsibility for things they don’t want to do and haven’t specifically been asked to do. Also, you can work out how good a worker is if you give them set tasks and then review their work. You can’t do this if you don’t know who has done what.

2. Be able to establish what support is required for daily living tasks 2.1Access information about support for daily living tasks, using an individual’s care plan and agreed ways of working Individuals can benefit from being as independent as possible in the tasks of daily living as it’s been recorded that people having the same level of choice, control and freedom in their daily lives as any other person. Independent living was placed at the heart of the last Government’s policy on disability. Each of the three main political parties expressed their approval of the Independent Living Strategy published in 2008, which sets out actions aimed at improving the choice and control disabled people have over the services they need to live their daily lives.

The aims of the strategy are that: * disabled people (including older disabled people) who need support to go about their daily lives will have greater choice and control over how support is provided; and *disabled people (including older disabled people) will have greater access to housing, education, employment, leisure and transport opportunities and to participation in family and community life. 2.2Clarify with the individual and others the requirements for supporting an individual’s independence in daily living tasks I encourage the residents to take as much responsibility for themselves as they are able to. I only supervise to make sure they are able to care for themselves, whether it is just helping them wash their back, reach for shoes ‘lost’ under a chair or bed or make sure they take their medication as and when necessary. If the Service User objects to any care, I ask them if there is any problem or if they are worried about anything and explain the reasons I have for wanting them to do their own daily living tasks.

2.3Describe how and when to access additional guidance to resolve any difficulties or concerns about support for daily living tasks

I support and treat all residents as individuals and with respect and dignity when considering their needs and preferences. This involves asking them their opinions on every aspect of their daily lives, from what time they wish to get up and have their meals to what they want to wear and what they wish to do during the day. Including their intimate hygiene and caring needs I discuss the care needs with the individual. I look at their care plan and if they do not agree with something on the plan I discuss this with them and then report and record the conversation with the manager and it is arranged that the resident should be re-assessed and an updated care plan could be made out with the changes (if feasible) wanted by the resident.

3. Be able to provide support for planning and preparing meals 3.1Support the individual to plan meals that contribute to a healthy diet and reflect the individual’s culture and preferences In order to support the Service User I would clarify with him any foods he/she can or can’t eat depending on culture and medical conditions and what they prefer to eat, whilst following any current guidelines for healthy eating. I would actively support them in the preparation of the food by encouraging them to prepare it themselves following all health and safety policies and referring the client to any ‘cook books’ etc.

I would encourage the client to store food safely by discussing and referring them to any food safety policies i.e. basic food hygiene, as well as actively supporting them in the initial storing of the food

3.2Support the individual to store food safely
I would encourage the Service user to store food safely by discussing and referring them to any food safety policies i.e. basic food hygiene, as well as actively supporting them in the initial storing of the food. 3.3Support the individual to prepare food in a way that promotes active participation and safety In order to support the Service User to plan and prepare meals that contribute to a healthy diet that reflect the individuals culture and preferences I would clarify any foods they can or can’t eat depending on culture and medical conditions and what they prefer to eat, whilst following any current guidelines for healthy eating. I would actively support them in the preparation of the food by encouraging them to prepare it themselves following all health and safety policies and referring the client to any ‘cook books’ .

4. Be able to provide support for buying and using household and personal items 4.1Identify different ways of buying household and personal items Different ways of buying household and personal items include using the internet and shopping in person. 4.2Work with the individual to identify household and personal items that are needed In order to identify household and personal items that are needed for the Service User I would discuss with, and if necessary supervise the Service User whilst he/she decided and took notes, depending on what they currently had in the house and therefore did or didn’t need. 4.3Support the individual to buy items in their preferred way To buy items in the way they preferred I would discuss with them and accompany the Service User whilst they were shopping on the internet or in person. 4.4Support the individual to store items safely

To support the client to store and use items safely I would discuss with them and refer them to any health and safety instructions that may come with or be noted on the products.

4.5Support the individual to use items safely
I would support the Service User to use agreed security measures by referring them to any leaflets or policies that had been issued either externally or internally by an agreed and secure source, and promoting active participation in the implementation of these security measures 5. Be able to provide support for keeping the home clean and secure 5.1Support the individual to keep their home clean, in a way that promotes active participation and safety I would support the Service Userl to keep their home clean in a way that supports active participation and safety by observing and discussing with them any issues that they may have, then referring them to any policies issued to the general public or organisations, and actively supporting them whilst they implemented these policies. I would supervise and describe different security risks to the client, whilst encouraging them to take notes as to what these are and describing to them ways to implement any concerns that either myself or the client had, I would also advise my line manager as to what these risks are so that any actions could be securely documented.

Some of these risks could include leaving doors and windows open or unlocked, or by allowing people into their home without asking for I.D etc. 5.2Describe different risks to home security that may need to be addressed I would supervise and describe different security risks to the Service User, whilst encouraging them to take notes as to what these are and describing to them ways to implement any concerns that either myself or the client had, I would also advise my line manager as to what these risks are so that any actions could be securely documented. Some of these risks could include leaving doors and windows open or unlocked, or by allowing people into their home without asking for I.D etc. 5.3Support the individual to use agreed security measures

I would support the individual to use agreed security measures by referring them to any leaflets or policies that had been issued either externally or internally by an agreed and secure source, and promoting active participation in the implementation of these security measures. 6. Be able to identify and respond to changes needed in support for daily living tasks In order to record any changes in the Service User’s circumstances that might affect the type or level of support that is required I would discuss these with the client and my line manager whilst recording these in the individuals care plan 6.1Enable the individual to express views about the support provided to increase independence in daily living tasks Involving everyone as much as possible, discuss and agree all of the personal (self-care), household, leisure, social and other activities which go on in the course of a week. (It is sometimes useful for staff to go over what they have done in their own lives in the last week to check that everything has been considered.)

6.2Record changes in the individual’s circumstances that may affect the type or level of support required I would discuss these with the Service User or/and his advocate and my line manager whilst recording these in the individuals care plan

6.3Adapt support in agreed ways to address concerns, changes or increased independence I would adapt support in agreed ways of working to address concerns, changes or increased independence by discussing with the Service User or /and his advocate and my manager what these may be. I would also takes notes and implement any changes in the individuals care plan


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