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Sonnet Essay Topics & Paper Examples

The Sound of the Sea

“The Sound of the Sea” is a sonnet by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, describing the sounds of the sea and relating it to human inspiration. Through only auditory images of the sea and other powerful natural forces, Longfellow effectively alludes to the nature of human inspiration. Through detailed and sensory imagery, Longfellow communicates the subtle details of the human soul and how inspiration functions. The Sound of the Sea” consists of fourteen lines and a particular rhyme scheme (abba abba cde cde). The first eight lines of the poem consist of one drawn out sentence, which is the description of the sound of the sea and other natural forces, which then in the final sestet, which also consists of only one…

Formal Features of Remember by Christina Rossetti

“Remember” is a sonnet by a poetess of Victorian England, Christina Rossetti. The poem was written in 1849 but was first published in 1862 in “Goblin Market and Other Poems” by Rossetti (Petacovic, 2009). Rossetti suffered from ill health throughout her life (Shanks, 2010); she seemed to be obsessed with her death and therefore wrote several poems (“Song”, “The One Certainty”) exploring the theme of death. Christina Rossetti was only 19 when she wrote “Remember”. Scholars believe that the poem was addressed to her fiance, Charles Cayley, though they later separated due to differing religious views. Written in iambic pentameter, “Remember” is a sonnet with Italian form. It is divided into an octet and a sestet. The octave (eight lines)…

Imagery in Shakespeare’s Sonnet

We all know that William Shakespeare is the best writer of his time and arguably of all time. His works have become household names that even the uneducated people know at least one work or a line from Shakespeare. Much credit to Shakespeare’s success is his way with words. The way he used them in his works is so effective that he is able to entertain his audience by the mere play of words. Just as Shakespeare has shown his literary prowess in playwriting, he has also used his masterful technique with words in his poetry. Sonnet 130 is one of Shakespeare’s works that show how good Shakespeare really is. His use of imagery is so vivid that it comes…

“Ozymandias” by Percy Bysshe Shelley

“Ozymandias” (pron.: /ˌɒziˈmændiəs/,[2] also pronounced with four syllables in order to fit the poem’s meter) is a sonnet by Percy Bysshe Shelley, published in 1818 in the 11 January issue of The Examiner in London. It is frequently anthologised and is probably Shelley’s most famous short poem. It was written in competition with his friend Horace Smith, who wrote another sonnet entitled “Ozymandias” seen below. In addition to the power of its themes and imagery, the poem is notable for its virtuosic diction. The rhyme scheme of the sonnet is unusual and creates a sinuous and interwoven effect. Contents 1 Analysis 2 Publication history 3 Smith’s poem 4 Cultural influence 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External links [edit]Analysis 1817…

Sir Philip Sidney

“Thou blinds man mark” one of Sir Philip Sidney’s most famous poem, he writes about desire. In the poem Sir Philip Sidney complains about desire yet he shows us how he was able to overcome desire. He starts off in the poem by saying the following “Thou Blind Man’s mark, thou fools self chosen share” He uses the sentence as a metaphor to compare desire to a snare. Sidney sees desire as a trap, if were to get a hold of one’s life. Sidney also compares desire to a “Web of will” which interprets his meaning of it as a trap. The trap is strong on its victims and has very prominent effects.In the second stanza Sidney exclaims “Desire, desire!…

Shakespeare Sonnet 129

Sonnet 129 is an interesting poem in Shakespeare’s set of sonnets, supposedly, addressed to his dark mistress. This sonnet is full figurative language and other poetic devices that let the reader know exactly how the poet feels about the emotions and dangers associated with lust. He also uses interesting punctuation choices that create the flow and tone of the poem. As the readers, we do not know who this poem is addressed to due to the lack of thou, he, or she in the poem. It does seem to be describing a personal experience, but we do not know for sure whom our poetic persona interacted with to cause these emotions. The poetic persona starts by describing just how cynical…

First Poem for You

The Shakespearean sonnet “First Poem for You” has an iambic pentameter and consistent rhyme scheme. Every other line represents a true rhyme – the final accented vowels and all succeeding consonants or syllables are identical. For example the words “complete” and “neat” (Addonizio 1, 3). Every line of the poem has a basic stressed and unstressed syllable format, except the last line. The extension of the last line “but touch them, trying” implements a longer stress (14). I believe this has definite meaning to the structure of the poem. In addition, the final verse of the poem is the longest line. In relation to the word “trying”, I believe that the longer stress and length in the final line of…

Analysis of Sonnet 43 and 30

Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote Sonnet 43 during the prime of the Victorian Period, which lasted the duration of Queen Victoria’s throne between 1832 and 1901. Like some of the works during the Victorian period, Sonnet 43 was a reflective piece about the love of her life, Robert Browning. Elizabeth Browning showed this reflection by answering her own posing question, “How do I love thee? ” William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 30 however, was written during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, between 1559 and 1603. Shakespeare’s Sonnets also were written during the era of the Renaissance, in which political changes such as reformation led to an ultimate rebirth of ideology and innovation. The theme of Sonnet 43 is intense love that will…

Comments Upon Sonnets from the Portuguese

SONNET 13 In the first two lines of “Sonnet 13”, Elizabeth Barrett Browning asks Robert if he wants her to write how she feels about him. In lines 3 and 4, she uses the metaphor of a torch in rough winds, which is meant to enlighten what is between them. In line 5, she drops it and goes on to say she cannot describe what she feels between them. In lines 6 through 8, she says she cannot risk herself by describing to him how she feels, and that she will not. In lines 9 through 14, she goes on to say that her silence must act as an answer to his question, otherwise she will relate to him nothing…

Poem Explication I carry your heart I carry it my

Explication of EE Cummings “[i carry your heart with me (i carry it in]” To better understand this very romantic poem, “[i carry your heart with me (i carry it in], we must first understand that Edward Estlin Cummings was an avant-garde, which can be defined as an intelligentsia that develops new or experimental concepts especially in the arts (Merriam-Webster). Punctuation and lowercase type are used in a way that’s visually appealing, while also highlighting the poem’s theme of unity. Cummings used this type of writing in many of his works. The poem “[i carry your heart with me (i carry it in]” by EE Cummings is a free verse poem about an undying love that is felt from within….

The Waste of Time

Sonnet 18 is a typical Shakespearean sonnet that hardly departs from the “classic” rules of an English sonnet. It has fourteen lines in a simple iambic pentameter; although, there are a few strong first syllables in the poem and some lines have eleven syllables instead of just ten. None of the lines flow into the next one. All of them have a distinct stopping place except that of line 9 (as far as punctuation goes.) There are three quatrains in the poem, the third one changes the tone of the poem, that are followed up by a rhymed couplet that ends the poem. The poem also has a typical rhyme scheme of ABAB CDCD EFEF GG. Sonnet 18 is considered…