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Sacred Destination Paper Essay

The Garden of Eden

The Garden of Eden is a sacred place to many people. This is a place that may or not actually exist, and if it is a real place it has not been confirmed. If the Garden of Eden was ever located it would be a place worth visiting.

The Origins

The origins of the Garden of Eden come from the book of Genesis in the Old Testament of the Bible. The word Eden means delight in Hebrew probably derives from the Akkadian word edinu. Edinu is believed to derive from the Sumerian term E.DIN which means plain or steppe. The connection may be coincidental, although E.DIN is known to have been used by the Sumerians to refer to Mesopotamia as the valley of E’din, meaning the fertile lands between the Tigris and Euphrates (“The Garden Of Eden”, 2014).

The Tree of Knowledge

The Tree of Knowledge is a sacred object found in the Garden of Eden. The Tree of Knowledge is a reminder is a reminder still used in the contemporary world to not be fooled by evil. In Christian mythology, eating the fruit from the Tree of Knowledge of good and evil was the initial sin committed by Adam and Eve that became known later as the fall of man, Adam and Eve died spiritually immediately following eating the fruit of the tree of knowledge, their sin separated them from God.

Similar Myths

The city of Dilmun in the Sumerian mythological was described as a paradise garden where no one got sick or died; it was the garden of immortality. Boulay (1990) stated,“Dilmun was a land intimately associated with Sumer and Akkad, and just like Meluhha (Africa) and Magan (Egypt) supplied their cities with many economic necessities either through tribute or by commercial exchange. Dilmun was also a sacred or holy land often called the residence of the gods, a sort of garden of Eden, often referred to as “the land of the living,” that is, the land of immortality” ( THE FABLED LAND OF DILMUN). Other similar myths in relation to the Garden of Eden include, Greek mythologies garden of the Hesperides, is similar to the Garden of Eden. Paradise in Persian means royal garden or hunting-park. And the Garden of Righteousness appears in Jewish mythology and is said to have be beautiful and glorious in the beginning and it will be beautiful and glorious in the end.

The Comparison

Creation myths across cultures have several obvious similarities and differences. There is substantial importance in the larger ideas, such as gender, the role of the human beings, and the outcome of the creation. I find it fascinating that many of the mythical stories from around the world have told a story where a God floods the earth. I think the flood stories in each myth may be a link between them. Creation myths concern our ancestors and gods of nature; the earth, the sky, the sun, the moon, and the stars. They are supernatural explanations of human origin and they help explain what humans could not explain to answers question about the creation of the earth and man that could be passed on for generations. Our culture and history would not be the same without the mythical place that surround the stories of our creation.

Conclusion

The stories of mythology in each different culture have a sacred meaning to the people of that culture. Just as the stories have meanings so do the places the story surrounds. There are different types of sacred destinations, some may be similar some could be completely different from one another. Regardless of their differences they are joined by the elements in each cultures story. Each culture has sacred places that allow the people to go beyond time and space, to be joined with their God in their time of worship or prayer.

References
Boulay, R. A. (1990). FLYING SERPENTS AND DRAGONS.
The Garden of Eden. (2014). Retrieved from
http://www.crystalinks.com/gardenofeden.html


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