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Roman Republic and Brutus Essay

Caesar`s saying really helps sum up Brutus’s character in Julius Caesar. Brutus was thought to not be a problem for Caesar and to be his right-hand man due to his dignity and devotion to him; however his qualities are exactly why it is such a disaster. What Brutus did was a huge surprise considering his traits. Caesar’s surprise was so huge; he could only whisper the three last few words, but Brutus also showed honor; and patriotism which also made up his character. Brutus is loyal to his country.

Brutus shows his great patriotism by comparing it with death, “If it aught toward the general good, Set honor in one eye and death I love the name of honor more than I fear death (85-86,89). Brutus values Rome above anything else and would be willing to give his life for the general good. Brutus claims he will be loyal to the end, due to his great love for Rome. Brutus’s patriotism covers every aspect of society. Brutus discusses the killing of Caesar with his fellow conspirators and claims “Caesar’s death is a benefiti and also says they now should cry iPeace, freedom, and liberty!

”(103). Brutus wishes to celebrate all of Rome’s triumphs and is especially proud to be a part of his country. Brutus allows Rome to be the most relevant factor in his life and its successes are his successes. Brutus also wants the people of Rome to know what is important and what his intentions are. He shows his feeling during his funeral speech when he says, “Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more” (21-22). Brutus shares his patriotism with the people of Rome and wants them to share his views.

The wellbeing of the nation is more important than the actual individual. Brutus has a high level of loyalty and he shows lots of devotion to Rome in his thoughts and speeches. Also honor is part of the character Brutus, and can be clearly seen during his vivid speeches. Brutus himself makes his honor clear in his speech. After the assassination of Caesar and during the funeral speech, Brutus asks the people of Rome, “Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him I have offended” (29-32).

This proves he is noble as he cares and protects the welfare of the people and Rome. He is torn between the great city of Rome and his friendship with Caesar. In the end; however, he must make a decision and decide which choice would be best for him. Brutus tries to prove his nobility to almost everyone. When Brutus utters his last words, he tells Caesar his intentions, “I killed thee with half so good a will” (50-51). His honor is always constant and never fails to succeed at even the most tough and discomfited situation.

Brutus considers his honor in every aspect and even takes his own life for his honor. Many people including his enemies were very much aware of his honor. When Antony witnessed Brutus dead body at the battleground of Philipi Antony said “he is the noblest Roman of them all” and “all the conspirators save only he, did that they did in envy of great Caesar; he, only in a general honest” (68-71). Brutus honor is very sturdy and obvious even his enemies witnessed his great honor. Antony knew Brutus was the only conspirator that would do such a true act.

Brutus nobility was obvious from his speeches and made seen with no trouble due to others awareness of his strong acts of honor. From this you can infer that Brutus was a very complex character. He had many different traits like great honor and strong patriotism for his state and people. He also had to make many tough decisions, like killing himself and going against. He also did not make some smart decisions, like not listening to Cassius. From this you should be able to conclude that Brutus is a controversial character, but is also honorable.


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