Haven't found the Essay You Want?
For Only $12.90/page

Rights and choices of individuals Essay

Explain how and when personal information may be shared with cares and others, taking into account legislative framework. Consent from the
individual should be taken into account in cases of emergency, abuse or neglect is suspected, decisions, treatment or information that is of best interest to the individual. If the resident is mentally incapable, informed consent should be given to the family or next of kin. Information shared to an advocate should be of individual’s best interest. Exchange of information from one health professional to the other should be done securely and access to it is carefully controlled. Outcome 2- Be able to maximize the rights and choices of individuals with dementia. Explain why it is important not to assume that an individual with dementia cannot make their own decisions One of the difficulties for individual with dementia is that as their dementia progresses they may lack capacity to make decisions for themselves.

However, the fact that they cannot make decision in some areas does not mean they cannot make decisions in other areas. A dementia suffer may be able to choose their dietary requirements but might not able to make a decision about what to wear. So it very important not to assume incapacity unless proven that the person actually lack capacity.Describe how the ability of an individual with dementia to make decisions may fluctuate. Making decisions for ourselves is not always easy at the best of times. How we each make decisions can be influenced by: those around us; our past experiences; our emotional state at the time; stress; our culture and beliefs; our approach to risk taking; economic and other pressures. Presented with similar circumstances, many of us will make different decisions because we give greater weight to some factors than to others. We often seek the advice of family, friends or colleagues. Many of us seek expert help at some time or other in our lives. Sometimes we make hasty, impulsive or unusual decisions but this does not mean we lack capacity.

The law states that a person is not to be treated as unable to make a decision just because he or she makes an unusual or unwise decision. Nor is someone to be automatically considered to lack capacity because they have a diagnosis of dementia and may need support in making decisions.

For all of these reasons, deciding when and how to use your powers to make decisions on behalf of the person with dementia is not easy. Part Two of this guide sets out the principles or rules that will help you and a checklist of questions to ask yourself when considering what to do.

Outcome 3- Be able to involve carers and others in supporting individuals with dementia Describe how a conflict of interest can be addressed between the carer and an individual with demwntia whilst balancing rights, choices and rights. Describe how to ensure an individual with dementia, carers and others to feel able to complain without fear of retribution. To accomplish this goal, the care provider must have systems in place that enable service users and their representatives or families to raise concerns about services and have confidence that any issues or problems they raise will be treated in confidence. In order to accomplish this end, people with Dementia need to have access to independent advocates to raise concerns about the care they receive. Care staff need to have training on people’s rights, as well as the right to complain. Staff need to be supported to provide an equitable service whilst the issues service users and/or their families have raised are resolved.

Outcome 4- Be able to maintain the privacy, dignity and respect of individuals with dementia whilst promoting rights and choices. Describe how to maintain privacy and dignity when providing personal support for intimate care to an individual with dementia. It’s very important that people with dementia are treated with respect. It is important to remember that a person with dementia is still a unique and valuable human being, despite their illness. This factsheet looks at ways that you can help the person to feel valued and good about themselves. When a person with dementia finds that their mental abilities are declining, they often feel vulnerable and in need of reassurance and support. The people closest to them – including their carers, health and social care professionals, friends and family – need to do everything they can to help the person to retain their sense of identity and feelings of self-worth. Helping the person feel valued

The person with dementia needs to feel respected and valued for who they are now, as well as for who they were in the past. There are many things that the people around them can do to help, including: trying to be flexible and tolerant

making time to listen, have regular chats, and enjoy being with the person
showing affection in a way they both feel comfortable with
finding things to do together, like creating a life history book. What’s in a name?
Our sense of who we are is closely connected to the names we call ourselves. It’s important that people address the person with dementia in a way that the person recognises and prefers. Some people may be happy for anybody to call them by their first name or nickname. Others may prefer younger people, or those who do not know them very well, to address them formally and to use courtesy titles, such as Mr or Mrs. Respecting cultural values

Make sure you explain the person’s cultural or religious background, and any rules and customs, to anyone from a different background so that they can behave accordingly. These may include: respectful forms of address what they can eatreligious observances, such as prayer and festivalsparticular clothing or jewellery that the person (or those in their presence) should or should not wear any forms of touch or gestures that are considered disrespectful ways of undressing

ways of dressing the hair
how the person washes or uses the toilet.
Acting with courtesy
Many people with dementia have a fragile sense of self-worth; it’s especially important that people continue to treat them with courtesy, however advanced their dementia. Be kind and reassuring to the person you’re caring for without talking down to them. Never talk over their head as if they are not there – especially if you’re talking about them. Include them in conversations. Avoid scolding or criticising them.

Look for the meaning behind their words, even if they don’t seem to be making much sense. Whatever the detail of what they are saying, the person is usually trying to communicate how they feel. Try to imagine how you would like to be spoken to if you were in their position. Respecting privacy

Try to make sure that the person’s right to privacy is respected. Suggest to other people that they should always knock on the person’s bedroom door before entering. If the person needs help with intimate personal activities, such as washing or using the toilet, do this sensitively and make sure the door is kept closed if other people are around. Everyone involved – including the person’s friends, family members, carers, and the person with dementia themselves – reacts to the experience of dementia in their own way. Dementia means different things to different people.

Essay Topics:

Sorry, but copying text is forbidden on this website. If you need this or any other sample, we can send it to you via email. Please, specify your valid email address

We can't stand spam as much as you do No, thanks. I prefer suffering on my own