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Planning an Outing Essay

The procedure to follow if an accident or illness is to occur You may need to assess the situation, never rush as this could result in bad manual handling. Check the area around you is safe, and if not remove all hazards. Only administer emergency first aid if you are trained to do so. Get help so they can phone emergency services or if alone call yourself but make sure you know the facts before you call. Make sure you report everything as soon as possible. Make sure you clean and sanitise the area if any mess was left behind. Principles of Safe Moving and Handling

Always read a service users care plan and follow health and safety act. Never lift service user manually, assess the service user to see if any changes have been made that may change their needs. Plan the task before you even start to move service user and make sure you let them know at all times what you are doing and get there consent. Make sure you have the correct equipment for the task and that it meets the needs of the service user. Check for any hazards and ensure handling area is clear of any obstructions. Give clear instructions to colleague’s/service user as to who’s taking the lead in the moving process as helps any confusion to care workers/assistants and service user. If service user needs an assisted stand/lift make sure correct posture, feet apart in direction of the movement, elbows close to the body, use your body weight to move service user bent from the knees and not the back.

An explanation of why it’s important to follow the care plan and communicate with each individual when assisting and moving If you are a helper in a treatment setting it’s always important to follow care plan that has been made by a social worker since they have a disciplined way of assessing a patient’s needs. Communicating with each service user potentially really eases service user’s anxiety, especially if you can build rapport. Communicating with colleague’s really helps you understand you role with service user. Staff responsibilities for medication in social care setting Safe administration of medicines means that medicines are given in a way that avoids causing harm to a person, only give medicines to the person they were prescribed for, people should receive the right medicine at the right time and in the right way. The care providers responsibility to provide written procedures that set out exactly how to give out medicines and it’s the care workers responsibility to follow these procedures. It is also all staffs responsibility to follow the seven rights of medication administration are as follows;

The right patient
The right drugs
The right dose
The right route
The right time
The right person
The right documentation

A brief description of agreed procedures for obtaining, storing, administering, recording the medication for the outing Obtaining, where the care provider is responsible for obtaining supplies of medicine on behalf of the service user, the care worker should check that there is enough to last for the next few days/the outing and to order the medicines as agreed in the service delivery plan. All unused regular and refused medication should be returned to the pharmacy at the end of the day/month. However, all required medication which is unused should be retained and used as directed on the care plan/labels. Storing medicines, care worker/assistant must have correct packaging for medicines depending on how long journey can be for example, if a short trip there are brown bags available from local chemists/pharmacy to store them in for short journeys. If journey may be longer there are also blister packs obtainable. They hold a 28 days’ worth of medicines. Special colours for different times of the day/night as different service users may need thought the day/outing i.e. Pink is for morning, yellow is for lunch, orange for evening, blue for night time medication.

Care workers/assistants need to keep them in a cool environment and have a list of all medications just in case a service doesn’t not take them and identify which service user refused. Administer, to select measure and give medication to a service user as specified in the care plan. Care workers/personal assistant will only administer in specially agreed circumstances where assessment of the service user under the mental capacity act has determined that the service user does not have the capacity to make decisions regarding medication for themselves and cannot self-medicate, instruct others manage their medication. Recording, A form used to record the details of prompting and assisting the medication and related tasks, and any other information regarding the medication or related tasks. Usually designed to show what was given, the dose given, the time given and the identity of the person who gave it which should always be signed and dated.

An explanation of the care workers accompanying the individuals on the outing should have special training before each of the following, Carrying out emergency first aid, assisting and handling, handling medication In the social care setting care workers/assistants need specialist training before carrying out first aid because if a service user needs any sort of emergency aid they need to be able to assess the situation and be able to have correct procedures in place in order to save someone’s life. It could also be very harmful if not. Assisting with moving and handling in order to understand how to assist service user also how to use correct equipment with confidence to help ease service user. Handling medication, social care worker/assistant to have understanding about the service users medical conditions also can monitor or report any important changes. The care worker/assistant needs all comprehension of most medicines and how they can affect service users.

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