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Physical Education Lesson Plan Essay

1. Grade level: Second Grade
2. Estimated level of developmental stage: predictable, self-paced (Hastie, 2012). 3. Number of students: Twenty
4. Fundamental skill (to be taught): Dribbling a soccer ball with their feet 5. State standard for Washington State (NASPE, 2008)
a. Demonstrates locomoter skills in a variety of activities and lead-up games i. Example: Uses walking/jogging/running skills in soccer ii. Demonstrates manipulative skills with stationary targets
1. Example: Kicks a ball toward a goal

iii. Demonstrates mature form in manipulative skills in a variety of activities
2. Example: Traps a ball in soccer
Section 2:
1. Student objective:
a. As a result of this lesson students will be able to demonstrate dribbling skills while both walking and then jogging. Students will also be able to demonstrate trapping a ball and kicking a ball towards a stationary object.
2. Lesson description

b. During this activity students will practice dribbling a ball with their feet; first walking and then jogging. Students will maintain control of the ball using the inside of their foot while dribbling the ball between cones towards the pop-up goal at the end of the field. Once the student reaches the last cone they will then trap the ball with their foot and take aim at the goal.
3. Classroom management system and student grouping

c. Students will be divided into five groups with four students in each group; each student will receive a shape card and will then be grouped according to the shape displayed on the card. Students will be reminded at the start of class regarding the class rules and consequences. Students will be reminded to use kind words, respect others around you, listen carefully, use equipment properly, and if in doubt ask. Consequences and rewards will be handled on a case by case basis meaning praise will be given to individual students and actions will be corrected as necessary. Ultimately the goal is to keep all students involved and engaged while ensuring the safety of everyone. As an educator it is important to be consistent and fair to all students using positive reinforcement and encouraging students to stay on task.

4. Equipment needed

d. Twenty soccer balls, twenty-five orange cones for setting up the obstacle course, five pop-up goals at the end of the course, and a large outside grassy field.
Section 3:
1. Content: Write a script of what the teacher would say and include the following for each task/skill. a. Task #1: Dribbling while walking first in a straight line, then through the cones i. Introducing the task/skill

1. Our first objective is to practice dribbling our soccer ball while walking. Remember to use the inside and outside of your foot when moving the ball down the field. I want you to first walk down the field dribbling your ball next to the row of cones and then return dribbling the ball while walking through the cones. When the first student begins the return trip through the cones the second student in the group may begin dribbling their ball next to the cones. ii. Safety concerns, rules and protocols to follow during the task

2. Watch out for other students

3. Be careful not to overtake the student in front of you 4. If the ball gets away from you quickly retrieve it iii.
Teaching the task/skill
5. Educator will demonstrate the task once at the beginning and then again if students have questions or need extra clarification.
iv. Questions to ask during the task as a form of assessment 6. What part of our foot do we use to dribble a ball? 7. Do we want to keep the ball close or far away? b. Task #2: Dribbling while jogging; first in a straight line then through the cones v. Introducing the task/skill

8. Our second objective is to practice dribbling our soccer ball while jogging. Remember to use the inside and outside of your foot when moving the ball down the field. I want you to first jog down the field dribbling your ball next to the row of cones and then return dribbling the ball while jogging through the cones. When the first student begins the return trip through the cones the second student in the group may begin dribbling their ball next to the cones. vi. Safety concerns, rules and protocols to follow during the task 9. Watch out for other students

10. Be careful not to overtake the student in front of you 11. If the ball gets away from you quickly retrieve it vii. Teaching the task/skill
12. Educator will demonstrate the task once at the beginning and then again if students have questions or need extra clarification. viii. Questions to ask during the task as a form of assessment 13. Was it easier or harder to dribble while you were jogging versus when you were walking? 14. Does the change in speed from walking to jogging affect your ability to maintain control of the ball?

2. Culminating activity:
c. Class, now we are going to combine our soccer skills together. We are going to have a relay race with each group being a team. The object of the game is for all students in each group to successfully kick their ball into the goal. The first student in each group will dribble their ball through the cones, trap the ball with their foot, and then kick the ball into the goal. Once their ball has successfully made it into the goal they will run back and tag the next teammate in line. The key to success in this game is maintaining control of your ball at all times.
3. Assessment:

d. In order to assess the students in my class I would use observational skills to determine if they are meeting the lesson objectives. I would use a scale rating system; based on a scale of one to five, with five being perfect and one being unsatisfactory. I would rate the students based upon whether they could maintain control of a ball while dribbling, trap the ball with their foot, and accurately kick the ball towards a stationary object.

Section 4:

1. Home/school connection:
a. I would send out an email to all parents suggesting ways students can practice dribbling skills at home. In the email I would include ideas such as parents setting up an obstacle course for kids to dribble through. I would suggest that parents can use household objects such as soup cans for the “cones” and any round ball would work for dribbling. I would encourage parents to practice with their kids by first demonstrating the skill and then just participating. When parents are involved with their kids in a physical activity the child is more likely to stick with it longer and of course it is an excellent way for parents to bond with their child.
2. Modifications and adaptations

b. Inclusion of a child with a physical impairment (e.g. a child confined to a wheelchair, or a child that requires the use of assistive technology). i. One way to include a child confined to a wheelchair would be to have them hold the soccer ball in their lap and maneuver their wheelchair through the cones; upon reaching the end they can throw the ball into the goal. A second way to include them would be to have them use a paddle to “dribble” the ball through the cones and ultimately hitting the ball into the goal. c. Inclement weather or an altered schedule forces you to change your location. Choose a different location to discuss (e.g. a smaller classroom as opposed to a gym).

ii. Due to inclement weather the lesson would need to be moved indoors to the gym. Since the gym floor surface is much smoother than a grassy field I would have the student’s only practice dribbling while walking in order to maintain better control of their ball. d. Several children from a different grade are temporarily joining this class for this particular lesson. iii. In order to include all students fairly I would disperse the children in groups using the shape cards, but if one group was disproportionately older students or younger students I would need to rearrange a bit. In order for the relay race to be fair each group would need an even mixture of older students versus younger students.

References
Hastie, P. (2012). Foundations of moving & learning. San Diego, CA. Bridgepoint Education, Inc.
NASPE (2008). Washington State K-12 state standards. Retrieved from http://www.k12.wa.us/HealthFitness/Standards-GLEs/HealthFitnessStateStandards.PDF.


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