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Oscar Wilde Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Oscar Wilde and the Aestheticism Movement

The arts in addition to crafts movement was the main clause of reform design in the 19th century that describes the era of its greatest advancement, roughly between 1870 and 1920 (Campbell, 2006). The two major stylistic advancements of this movement’s philosophy are the Aesthetic Movement and Art Nouveau. Aesthetic Movement of the 19th century, according to Lambourne, (1996) is a movement that existed in the 1870s to 1880s, which made itself noticeable through the fine in addition to decorative arts and architecture in both Britain and the United States. Its influence in Europe was so great that it is had to describe. In response to what was perceived as evidence of philistinism in art and design, it was typified…

The Importance of Being Oscar Wilde

Among the writers of the late nineteenth century in Britain, none perhaps has surpassed the reputation and press accorded to the inimitable Oscar Wilde. With controversies plaguing most aspects of his life—from his writing to his personal life—Wilde has eventually become an icon of his generation, resonating with readers far and wide, many celebrating his unique voice and alternative thinking. The man as a poet, playwright, and fiction writer used his wit and intelligence as well as a sharp way with words to create masterpieces that have ultimately become part of the literary canon. Two of these, The Importance of Being Earnest and The Picture of Dorian Gray, are some of the most studied in literary scholarship worldwide, and are…

Satire in the Importance of Being Earnest

The use of comedy helps bring books, movies and plays to life. In some cases, it is even written around the idea of comedy itself. The play Importance of Being Earnest written by Oscar Wilde criticizes the aspect of the aristocratic life in the Victorian era by making fun of them with a term called satire. In the play, Wilde creatively uses three different types of irony. These being: verbal, dramatic and situational forms of irony. Each form of irony is used to mock the behavior and status of the characters, depending on their character and position in the society. Verbal irony is shown in which a person says or writes something and means another, or uses words to convey…

The Picture of Dorian Grey

“The Picture of Dorian Grey” is one of the most interesting masterpieces of Oscar Wilde and has the greatest value as the only published novel, written by this author. If the reader is familiar with this book, than he, perhaps, would also know that the book has gone through a series of revisions by the author himself. Oscar Wilde added an entire chapter to his story that provided the reader with the insight into the feelings and emotions of the main character. What is this book about? One could say that the book tells a story of a young handsome man, who sold his soul for the opportunity to maintain his beauty and remain young. It is an extremely superficial…

“The Picture of Dorian Gray” and “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.”

The two books I have chosen for my open study are: The Picture of Dorian Gray and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The first one, written in 1890 by Oscar Wilde, is the story of a young, aristocratic dandy who, influenced by a friend, becomes a hedonistic, selfish man who ends in tragedy. The second, written in 1886 by Robert Louis Stevenson, is the story of a scientist, Dr. Jekyll, who, under the effect of a potion, mutates into a terrifying monster every night, killing whoever doesn’t please him. Choosing the books was not a difficult task for me: ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ is a book I read last year, and took great pleasure in reading, but I felt…

The Color of Innocence

In the context of “The Picture of Dorian Gray,” one of the most noticeable and important motifs is that of the color white and its variants, including, but not limited to, pale and listless. The meaning of this color evolves as the novel progresses, changing in relation to Dorian’s character. While the motif may never physically alter in appearance, it succeeds in reversing meaning completely, signifying the great contrast in Dorian’s soul between the beginning of the novel and the end. In the very beginning of the novel, as Basil speaks of his first encounter with Mr. Gray, he notes that when their “eyes met, I [Basil] felt that I was growing pale” (9). The motif comes to signify a…

The Influences of Oscar Wilde

Throughout his life Oscar Wilde had many strong influences exerted upon him. During his early childhood his mother influenced him and into college some of his professors and certain philosophers left a substantial impression upon him. Into adulthood these influences leaked out in his writing. These influences gave him ample ideas for writing The Picture of Dorian Gray. Wilde’s study of the Hellenistic ideals of Epicurus, his coddled lifestyle as a child and his devotion to the movement of Aesthetics and Moral Ambiguity have produced one of the most astounding works of horror fiction. Oscar Wilde’ more effeminate attitude toward life and the way he looked at beauty can be attributed to his mother, Speranza. “It was said that Speranza…

“Hedonism” By Jessica Shelby

Oscar Wilde’sThe Picture of Dorian Gray is a prime example of hedonism, a movement in the late 1800’s that claims pleasure to be the prime goal in one’s life. The focus of the novel is the beauty of Dorian Gray, his self-destructive search for pleasure, and the corruption of both the lives he has encountered and his own soul. Beauty and pleasure are the focus of all characters and scenes depicted in The Picture of Dorian Gray. Wilde’s timeless novel vividly portrays the hedonism ideals as the theme of the Picture of Dorian Gray with its characters’ mentality, roles, and eventual demise. The hero of the novel, Dorian Gray, is introduced as an innocent, beautiful young boy until he-in a…

Women in “The Importance of Being Earnest”

“The Importance of Being Earnest” was written by the famous Irish author Oscar Wilde. The play represents Wilde´s late Victorian view of the aristocracy, marriage, wit and social life during the early 1900’s. His characters are typical Victorian snobs who are arrogant, overly proper, formal and concerned with money. The women are portrayed as sheltered, uneducated, and some as dominating figures over the men in their lives. There is no sense of identity for Cecily and Gwendolen, the only woman within the play that clearly stands out is the Governess, Lady Bracknell. Wilde creates Lady Bracknell to represent society during the 1900’s. Her tone is always earnest: she is arrogant and she speaks in commands, judgements, and pronouncements. She is…

“The Happy Prince” by Oscar Wilde

My immediate response to these works by Oscar Wilde is that they are charmingly light-hearted, evocative, challenging in content and meaning, and that the Fairy stories, in particular, are a delight to read. With his fairy stories, Oscar Wilde has fused a traditional literary form with contemporary social issues. His stories use evocative imagery, personified animals and objects and fantastical situations, all in the manner of traditional fairy stories. But Wilde, through both direct and symbolic channels, imbues his works with an acidic bite. Unlike conventional children’s’ stories, his concern themselves with unrequited love, unnoticed death, and social injustice and several of them end unhappily or at least with a bittersweet tinge to their resolutions. Wilde manages to set up…

MWDS : The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde was born on October 16, 1854 to Sir William Wilde and Jane Wilde, the second of three children. Wilde studied at Oxford, and joined the Freemasons in 1878 after failing to join the Oxford Union. After graduation, he went home to Dublin and began writing poems. The Picture of Dorian Gray was his first and only novel. Wilde married Constance Lloyd in 1884 and perished on November 30, 1900 to cerebral meningitis. Historical Information As the second industrial revolution went on, steel, railroads, and electricity allowed for the economic growth of the United States and Western Europe. The standard of living rose dramatically, and health concern and sanitation caused infection and death rates to drop greatly. During the…

The selfish giant

Oscar wilde ( 1854 – 1900) was born in Dublin, Ireland, the second of three childrend born to a well-known medical specialist and a prominent poetess, prose and nationalist under the pseudonym Speranza. In 1871 he enterrd Trinity College, then he went on to study the classics at Magdalen College, Oxford, England from 1874-1878. In 1881 he made a long tour of Americaa to deliver lectures on aesthetics. When thr Aesthetic Movement became popular, Oscar Wilde earned a reputation of being leader of the movement and as apostle of beauty. In his life, there are many popular success such as: “the happy prince and other tales” (1888). “A house of pomegranates”. “Lord Arthur Savile’s crime” (1891). In all of his…

Literary Analysis of Dorian Gray

To describe the walking dead all of the following apply: soulless, insatiable hunger, actions based purely on instinct; these qualities combined, with or without the rotting flesh, make a zombie but also can be readily applied to the main character of The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde. The novel analyzes the value of beauty and pleasure and poses a very interesting contradiction between the traditional views of morality and quality of life. Dorian, an aesthetic young man, is tempted into vice, thus selling his soul for eternal beauty. In the late 19th century, Saul Kripke: a philosopher, proposed the idea of philosophical zombies. His theory proposed a creature visually and behaviorally the same as a human being that…