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Native Americans Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Mary Rowlandson

In A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, the author depicts a transformation she undergoes during her captivity at the hands of the Indians. While her first inclination in captivity is to end her suffering as quickly as possible by giving up on her life, Rowlandson quickly takes up the role of survivalist, determined to stay alive long enough to be released and returned back to civilization. Along the way, however, Rowlandson compromises on aspects of her life in order to achieve this survival. As a means of surviving the ordeal of a constantly changing environment, Rowlandson adapts her opinions regarding food, the Native Americans, and even the land around her to take on the perspective…

Native American Spirituality

The purpose of this essay is to present the spiritual world of the Native Americans, which is one of the oldest forms of Spirituality that exists on earth. The main reason why I have chosen this topic is because I want to find out more information about their spiritual dimension and perhaps to understand better the main differences between our religion and theirs. In order to better observe this aspect, I will be analyzing the religious beliefs of three Native American tribes, such as: The Iroquois, the Apache and the Dakota tribes. To start with, I consider it relevant to mention that the Native American religions centers on a collection of beliefs, which vary from tribe to tribe. However, almost…

Turner Thesis Summary

Throughout history society has to go through many changes that not only affect many of the people but also the areas around the transformation. The main point of Fredrick Jackson Turner’s thesis is what the real essence of America is, and how we’re all influenced by the many changes we have to go through. He believes that American history should not be focused on the extension of European enterprise. The society will have to realize that America will have to be emancipated because of the fact that we had a country with an unlimited amount of boundaries and have to come to realization that we have many closed-spaced limits. The views in the seminal essay share his thoughts on the…

Indian Nations

For Centuries, Indian Nations converted their knowledge into wealth and social order through that process of innovation. The purpose of innovation is to create a new value for a society at large. Indian Nations created those new values in the form of advancements in many fields like Mathematics, Architecture and Religion that modern society continues to build on. Divergent Indian Tribes, throughout North and South America, had been thriving and living for generations with a deep reverence for their God or Spirit, and living in symbiosis with the land. As the new settlers arrived, they introduced their own brand of social order, however, they failed to understand the impact their desire to conform or corral the native people would forever…

Smoke Signals

Smoke Signals portrays the some of the problems Native American Indians have had to deal with over the years. The main character is a young Native American teenage boy, Victor Joseph, (Adam Beach), and how alcohol affected his life and relationship between him and his father, Arnold Joseph, (Gary Farmer),. This story brings to light the custom of storytelling by the Native American’s. Story telling is used as narration by another character, Thomas, (Evan Adams). These stories by Thomas prompt flashback memories and explain the nature Victor and Thomas’ relationship and how it formed from the time they were infants. Victor and Thomas set out on a road trip to Phoenix to retrieve Victor’s fathers remain after his death and…

French and Indian War

The French and Indian War altered the political, economic, and ideological relations between Britain and American colonies. Ideologically, this War brought up resentment toward Britain this changed the political relationship between Britain and its colonists because the British were forced to unfairly tax them due to their debt. The French and Indian war transformed North America by only leaving the British and the colonists left in their region. Greedy as the British were they did not treat the colonists fair by taxing them lead to resentment that lead to the American Revolution. After the French and Indian War, North America completely changed. Before 1754 English, French, Spanish, and the Russians had a portion of North America that they had power…

Settlement of the West over the Whole Period

In considering the process of the settlement of the West over the whole period, how far can the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 be seen as the key turning point? The war of 1812 was followed by a period of exploration of the West which had been greatly expanded by the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. The process of expansion was huge and resulted in the original 13 states being 45 states by 1906. As well as the Louisiana Purchase, the Mexican-American War and the Californian Gold Rush of 1848, the Homestead Act of 1862 and the Exodus movement from 1879 were all key turning points which helped the process of Westward Expansion. The key criteria for judging a turning point is…

Motivational Interviewing

The Motivational Interviewing and Stages of Change approach is complementary to the cultural values of Native American people and emphasizes listening, learning, and respect. Addictions in this day and time can be contributed to many factors and effect every ethnicity of people. Substance addiction has even affected the smallest ethnicity of people, Native Americans since their encounter with white people. Motivational Interviewing (MI) has even helped Native Americans through counselors learning and implementing the techniques. Even though clients are naturally resistant to change, utilizing the three pillars are very effective in helping even Native American people because expressing empathy shows that you care and developing discrepancy between client’s present behaviors and values & beliefs. Counselors today need to be trained…

Treatment of Native Americans

From the very beginning of American history, settlers have poorly treated the Native Americans. As some people know, “poorly” is an understatement. The treatment of the indigenous people was horrible during the 1800s from being forced to move west, having laws made against them by the government, and mass murder, even though that isn’t what our history books like to tell us today. In 1804, fur trading was established with the Oglala and became a big part of their life. Then, the Oglala and Lakota tribes decided to expand their control and influences west toward the Big Horn mountains. Then, on March 26, the United States government forced the Native Americans to move west past the Mississippi River. This meant…

Native Americans in the United States and Hardy Individualism

Prompt: Although the development of the Trans-Mississippi West is popularly associated with hardy individualism, it was in fact largely dependent on the federal government. Assess the validity of this statement with specific reference to western economic activities in the 19th century. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, the idea of the far west captivated many. The chance to begin life anew attracted thousands of individuals and families alike to move out west and escape their current life, which was usually full of poverty and for some, full of discrimination. As the west expanded and grew into an important part of the United States, westerners found it somewhat difficult to survive with important resources going scarce. Although the development of…

The Five Civilized Tribes and the “Trail of Tears”

The Indian Removal Act and the “Trail of Tears” was one of the worst tragedies in American history. It shows that the US government was forcing Native Americans to move from their homelands and endure great hardships of famine, cold and harsh weather, long treks on foot, and unfamiliar places with no regards to their safety, culture, history and wellbeing. Since the settling of North America by European colonists, relations between Native Americans and their increasing neighbors had been a bone of contention. While various groups were able to maintain peaceful relationships for a short time, the most general and often remembered state is one of hostility and disagreement. Both before and after its forming, the United States would encroach…

The Native American

Native Americans are an indigenous people throughout the world, simply misunderstood and ill-treated for centuries (Scheafer, 2012). History tells us, Native Americans were subject to land theft, controlled by others, and resistance to governance. This discrimination goes back to Christopher Columbus. He and his followers showed true hatred toward the Indian Nation. Europeans moved to extermination or genocide trying to distinguish this culture of people. The United States joined in that mission as time moved forward. Indian land would be taken, the people would be made to conform to the law of the white man causing them to build a defense mechanism of avenging their losses. During the nineteenth century the white man government made policy to give fairness to…

Unfair Treatment of the Native Americans

Throughout the 19th century Native Americans were treated far less then respectful by the United States’ government. This was the time when the United States wanted to expand and grow rapidly as a land, and to achieve this goal, the Native Americans were “pushed” westward. It was a memorable and tricky time in the Natives’ history. The US government made many treatments with the Native Americans, making big changes on the Indian nation. Native Americans wanted to live peacefully with the white men, but the result of treatments and agreements was not quite peaceful. In this essay I will explain why and how the Native Americans were treated by the United States’ government, in which way were the treaties broken…

The Kennewick Man

When we think of prehistoric bones and fossils we think of dinosaurs and creatures of huge amount of size, but the findings of Kennewick Man changed the very thought of prehistoric beings. So exactly who is the Kennewick Man and why is he so important? Why is he given such a name as to Kennewick Man? Why would anyone want to fight and file lawsuits on each other to for a pile of old dusty bones? Well that’s what is found here on the case of “Kennewick Man.” Scientist and Native Americans just can’t keep their hands off this precious specimen. Why does one deserve Kennewick Man over the other? What values does he hold for them? Can Kennewick Man…

Health Promotions Among Diverse Populations

Marginalization of the Native American population is a result of colonialism; they were considered to be ignorant and hostiles by the “White” settlers, forced to live on reservations, lost their culture and values through assimilation and stripped of their rights in society. Segregation, Social Darwinism, and other discriminatory practices have led to the marginalization of Native Americans, resulting in the lowest standard of living in the United States, high rates of alcoholism, and a significant loss of heritage as they are cut off from native rituals and language and encouraged to meld into the cultural expectations of mainstream America. In this document of research, I will compare my findings on Native American Health with the general population at this time….

The Battle at Wounded Knee

The Massacre at Wounded Knee was a terrible battle in American History. This massacre was between the Native Americans and the US government. Back then; the US government hated Native Americans. They would treat Native Americans horribly by killing them, stealing their land and much more. One early and freezing morning on December 29th, 1890, an elderly chief of the Sioux Indians named Big Foot marched to the banks of Wounded Knee creek. Over 350 of his followers marched with him and camped there. Around Wounded Knee creek was US government troops that were going to arrest Big Foot and take all of his followersfollower’s weapons away. Many different controversies started all of this trouble. The Sioux tribe had no…

Compare And Contrast Songs

The two songs “Indian Reservation” by Paul Revere and The Raiders, and “Seminole Wind” by John Anderson expressed emotion, culture, and religion. “Indian Reservation” song has more of an ‘upbeat’ tempo, and the lyrics that the band sang are a personal view of a Native American or Cherokee tribe. The lyrics seemed angry as they sang about how the Cherokee tribe turned into a mess by becoming “Americans”. For example: when the song said , “and all the beads we made by hand, are nowadays made in Japan,” The song shows that the Cherokee tribe’s hard work was important; but, the “American” people took over the Cherokee’s work and did not appreciate what they once created by hand. The Cherokee…

Domains Of Culture

1. When you think about the origins of Religion and Spirituality in American culture, a lot of different ideas, stories or parables come to mind. But one question is hardly ever asked or even thought of. Does American culture have a religion? More to the point, is there a religion that can solely be sourced to origins on American soil? The answer is yes. Both Mormonism and Scientology have roots deeply planted in American culture. However, around 25,000 Americans practice Scientology and an estimated 6.1 Million Americans practice Mormonism. That makes up 1.8% of Americans, in addition to that most Americans don’t recognize Scientology as a real religion and Mormonism falls under the Christianity branch of belief. So what ideas…

Tonto’s Dysfunctional Family Tree

America is a multicultural nation. This fact is undeniable. We are a mishmash of people from all parts of the globe, each with a unique story to tell. One of the struggles of being such a diverse nation is that different ethnic groups often fail to understand one another. I believe that cross-cultural writing is a powerful tool that dispels ignorance and fosters greater multicultural understanding. Writing has the power to bring people together. There are many prominent cross-cultural writers in the history of American literature. Each of them has added to a growing genre that explores what it’s like to move to this country in pursuit of the ever-elusive “American Dream.” Sherman Alexie is one such writer. However, his…

Indian Essay

Throughout American culture, racism and stereotypes have been prevalent, yet the Disney movie Pocahontas is an attempt to better understand racial intolerance towards Native Americans. Though the movie is not completely historically accurate, the context of it portrays a more truthful story of the first European and Native American encounters which were mostly hostile ones, contrary to the modern American belief of “Thanksgiving” like events. However, there were attempts of understanding each other’s cultures and beliefs which can be displayed in the Disney movie through the interactions of characters, Captain John Smith and Pocahontas. While symbolism is present throughout the movie, Disney uses combinations of music, colors, and lighting along with metaphorical character interaction, to play on viewers emotions in…

Native Americans

Native Americans were the first people living in the United States until Europeans arrived, sought to colonize and take over. During this time, Native Americans were subjugated to warfare, new government and losing their lands. Forced to submit to White settlers, many Native Americans have had to choose between assimilating into a White culture or preserving their heritage and ancestry. This essay will discuss public policy regarding Native Americans and provide some examples pertaining to ethnocentrism and cultural relativity. Public Policy and Ethnocentrism From early on, Native American culture has been on a collision with White society. During the colonial period, the government did not want to have any issues with settlers and Native Americans. Schaefer mentions that Whites were…

Richard Wagamese’s novel “Indian Horse”

Families play a large role in the lives of every person to ever live. If one is born without a family, their lives will be much different than one who is born with a family, whether that family has a positive influence on said person or not. Every member of a family shapes a person’s identity, especially when they are growing up. If a child grows up with irresponsible parents that do not care for their child or adhere to their needs, the child will most likely grow up to become a person of a similar fashion with similar characteristics as their parents because that is all they have experienced and that is the only way that they know how…

Cultural Self-Assessment

Introduction No two people are the same. Race, ethnicity, gender, and age are all factors that make individuals different and unique. Throughout this paper, I will be discussing my values, beliefs and traditions, how I identify myself, and my attitude on diversity. Family Values, Beliefs, and Traditions My family is very diverse and comes from many different places. My maternal grandmother came to the United States from England when she was 18 and met my biological grandfather. They lived in Montana on Flathead Indian Reservation. This is where my mother was born and raised. When my mother was in high school, she met my father who was a senior when she was a freshman. My father’s distant relatives came to…

European Motives for Journey to the New World

From 1450 to 1600, the desire for conquest, resources, and spreading religion spurred European journeys of exploration and conquest to the new world.  One seemingly very appealing idea to the Europeans was to conquer new land and expand their own. Fray Bartolome de las Casas, the Bishop of Chiapas, angrily describes the invasion of Europeans into New Spain to show their inhumane nature. Fray tells how they murdered people on the pretense of settling the land; this describes their want for conquest. In document 5, the author similarly describes the horrific actions of the Spaniards but in a rather somber tone, to depict the expansion hungry side of the Europeans. Again the Europeans are shown conquering new land. Guaman Poma…

Developments in transportation

Developments in transportation, rather than in manufacturing and agriculture, sparked American growth in the first half of the 19th century; moreover, it was the booming railroad industry, the country massive turnpikes, and the canals promoting water travel that sparked American growth in the first half of the 19th century. Railroads had been in the making for years, and they just kept improving, thus improving the ease of news spread and travel throughout the United States. The turnpikes going from city to city brought ease in trading goods and transportation. In addition, the canals, such as the Erie Canal, promoted the thought of water travel leading to many key inventions and vehicles. Although developments in manufacturing and agriculture had a profound…

Early Racism in Disney Movies

Disney’s early work has always had a hint of racism in them, I recently watched Disney’s Fantasia released in 1942 was edited and remade because of a very racist scene. I watched a scene where there are many colorful centaurs, male and female; they are frolicking through like a forest. When the lady centaurs notice the males there are little baby cupids that come down and are getting them all dolled up for the male centaurs. Every male is matched up with their matching color centaurs the scene ends with every centaur and their mate flirting and having a ball. The part that was cut out was one little black centaur a girl with barrettes in her hair. She was…

The Warrior Maiden

The Oneida tribe is a Native American people that belong to the Iroquois Confederacy, which settled originally in upstate New York. The name that the people give themselves is derived from “Onayotekaono”, meaning the “People of the Upright Stone”. The story of the “Warrior Maiden” is not necessarily specific to the Oneida tribe, but it is actually a rather common legend among the Native American peoples. However, the story is to be found in different versions that are, for their most part, dissimilar and adapted to the particular tradition of each tribe. The Southern tribes, such as the Hopi people who are based in Mexico, have an almost entirely different version of the “Warrior Maiden” story. The Oneida version of…

Mohawk Indians: Past and Present

The Mohawk Nation is a Native American tribe of the New York area. They were a sedentary tribe who practiced agriculture in the harsh northeast climate. The primary crops were corn, squash, and beans. The Mohawk were skilled trappers who took advantage of this skill when the Europeans arrived in their area. The tribes worked with other tribes to achieve better relations with other Native Americans and Europeans. This included a constitution and treaties with Americans and Canadians. The modern day Mohawk Nation has tried to keep their culture and their land. The nation of the Mohawks once covered a large area of New York, Ontario, and Quebec. Present day Mohawks mainly live on three reservations. The tribes on these…

Beliefs and Morals of the Native Americans

Developed a Moral System (Ethics)In the Indian society there are well structured boundaries as to what people should and shouldn’t do. It is similar in many respects to our modern Australian code of ethics; one man should not take the wife of another to be his own or steal from anyone else within their own tribe. Everyone is expected to share what they had for the benefit of the whole region too. So while not everyone likes some of the social law and order that is imposed, they all see the importance and control that it holds and respect the decisions of their chieftains. Children are expected to follow the commands and teachings of their parents. It is an automatically…

Native Americans in “The Pearl” by John Steinbeck

Steinbeck’s The Pearl is one of his most intriguing pieces. Steinbeck manages to fit many different ideas into a short novella that is under a hundred pages. However, what makes The Pearl truly a great book is his critique of colonial society, and the interaction of Native Americans and colonists. Steinbeck emphasizes the differences between the colonists and the native Indians by using such symbols as the relationship between town and village, education, and instinct. Steinbeck also shows that he views changing one’s station, or attempting to, as foolish and impossible, but that trying to is needed to provide an example for others. Steinbeck uses the differences between town and village as a metaphor for the differences between the colonists…