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Military Discipline Essay

Bring out uniformity in cooperating for the attainment of a common goal. This uniformity is obtained when an individual understands how to fit into an organization as a whole. To understand one another through the sharing of common goals. To ensure effectively of a group not only for specified purposes but also for emergencies.

To install responses automatically without panic in an emergency.

D. Principles of Effective Discipline
Men fell wore secure if they knew that reward and punishment come to them because of behavior and not because of an officer’s word, mood or preference. An officer must be loyal to his men and worthy, takes an interest in them and makes sure they are granted rights and privileges.

An officer commands publicly and reproves and reprimand privately. He gains the confidence of his men and is worthy of it.
An officer/leader must set an example.

E. Military Courtesy – it is the accepted form of politeness in the military service. The foremost of this special form of courtesy is the salute. It is the expression or manifestation of consideration for others.

F. Whom to Salute
Commissioned officers of the AFP, National Flag, Colors, and standard not cased. Officers of foreign Armed Forces whose government is recognized by the republic of the Philippines.
All civilians who are entitled by the custom to the salute.
G. Proper Manner of Saluting
Except when walking one should always be at attention when saluting. The right hand is raised smartly until the tip of the forefinger touches the lower part of the headgear or forehead and slightly to the right eye.

Thumb and finger are extended and joined. The palm is turned slightly in front of the body. The forearm is inclined at 45 degrees angle and the hand and wrist are in straight line. The first position of the hand salute or the nearest point of approach is more or less six paces. The first position of the salute should be held until the person saluted to have passed or the salute is returned.

The hand salute under the naval custom is accompanied by a word of greeting such as “good morning, Sir/Ma’am” depending on the time of day.
Naval custom permits saluting with left hand when a salute cannot be rendered by the right hand.
H. Major Fault in Saluting
Bowing the head as the salute is given.
Dropping the hand salute before it has been returned.
Holding the hand awkwardly high or letting it sag too low.
Saluting while on the double time.
Avoiding the gaze of the person saluted to.
Saluting with a pipe, cigar, or cigarette in the mouth or in hand.
I. Honors to the Colors and Anthem
Whenever the National Anthem is played and you are not on formation and not in a vehicle, come to attention and at the first note, face the flag and render the prescribed salute. If no flag is nearer, face the music and salute.

Vehicles in motion are brought to halt. Troop formations, riding in vehicles do not disembark. If outdoors and uncovered, attend at attention and face the flag. If indoor, officers and enlisted men will stand at attention. The passing of being passed by an uncased color, which is being paraded, presented or in its own formal display, a salute at six paces before and until it has passed you. In uncovered, stand at attention when passing by uncased color. The marks of respect above are also rendered to the national anthem of any friendly country when played upon an official occasion.

Discipline

1. Training to act in accordance with rules; drill. 2. Activity, exercise, or a regimen that develops or improves a skill; training 3. Punishment inflicted by way of correction and training. 4. The rigor or training effect of experience, adversity 5. Behavior in accord with rules of conduct; behavior and order maintained by training and control


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