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Mice and men tension Essay

How Does Steinbeck Create Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck creates tension by making the atmosphere before Curley’s dog gets shot very awkward. He does this by writing about how small noises draw everyone’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all men in the room, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote gives a sense of tension, since tiny things like rippling cards can drew everyone’s attention. This makes it seem like a very quiet atmosphere. While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Candy just stares at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Candy can think about is his dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel.

Tension is also created by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the atmosphere of the room leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, meaning the shot will be heard by Candy. This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the room because no one is quite sure as to how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the room by telling Candy that he can have one of his puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them pups he wants.” However, Candy refuses to acknowledge his offer, strengthening the already tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Create Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck creates tension by making the atmosphere before Curley’s dog gets shot very awkward. He does this by writing about how small noises draw everyone’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all men in the room, so that he stopped doing it.”

This quote gives a sense of tension, since tiny things like rippling cards can drew everyone’s attention. This makes it seem like a very quiet atmosphere. While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Candy just stares at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Candy can think about is his dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel. Tension is also created by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the atmosphere of the room leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, meaning the shot will be heard by Candy. This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the room because no one is quite sure as to how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the room by telling Candy that he can have one of his puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them pups he wants.” However, Candy refuses to acknowledge his offer, strengthening the already tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse.

How Does Steinbeck Create Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck creates tension by making the atmosphere before Curley’s dog gets shot very awkward. He does this by writing about how small noises draw everyone’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all men in the room, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote gives a sense of tension, since tiny things like rippling cards can drew everyone’s attention. This makes it seem like a very quiet atmosphere. While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Candy just stares at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Candy can think about is his dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel. Tension is also created by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the atmosphere of the room leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, meaning the shot will be heard by Candy.

This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the room because no one is quite sure as to how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the room by telling Candy that he can have one of his puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them pups he wants.” However, Candy refuses to acknowledge his offer, strengthening the already tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Create Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck creates tension by making the atmosphere before Curley’s dog gets shot very awkward. He does this by writing about how small noises draw everyone’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all men in the room, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote gives a sense of tension, since tiny things like rippling cards can drew everyone’s attention. This makes it seem like a very quiet atmosphere. While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Candy just stares at the ceiling and eventually rolls over.

This makes the reader feel that all Candy can think about is his dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel. Tension is also created by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the atmosphere of the room leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, meaning the shot will be heard by Candy. This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the room because no one is quite sure as to how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the room by telling Candy that he can have one of his puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them pups he wants.” However, Candy refuses to acknowledge his offer, strengthening the already tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse.

How Does Steinbeck Create Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck creates tension by making the atmosphere before Curley’s dog gets shot very awkward. He does this by writing about how small noises draw everyone’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all men in the room, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote gives a sense of tension, since tiny things like rippling cards can drew everyone’s attention. This makes it seem like a very quiet atmosphere. While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Candy just stares at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Candy can think about is his dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel. Tension is also created by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the atmosphere of the room leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, meaning the shot will be heard by Candy.

This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the room because no one is quite sure as to how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the room by telling Candy that he can have one of his puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them pups he wants.” However, Candy refuses to acknowledge his offer, strengthening the already tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Create Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck creates tension by making the atmosphere before Curley’s dog gets shot very awkward. He does this by writing about how small noises draw everyone’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all men in the room, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote gives a sense of tension, since tiny things like rippling cards can drew everyone’s attention. This makes it seem like a very quiet atmosphere.

While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Candy just stares at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Candy can think about is his dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel. Tension is also created by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the atmosphere of the room leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, meaning the shot will be heard by Candy. This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the room because no one is quite sure as to how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the room by telling Candy that he can have one of his puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them pups he wants.” However, Candy refuses to acknowledge his offer, strengthening the already tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse.

How Does Steinbeck Create Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck creates tension by making the atmosphere before Curley’s dog gets shot very awkward. He does this by writing about how small noises draw everyone’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all men in the room, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote gives a sense of tension, since tiny things like rippling cards can drew everyone’s attention. This makes it seem like a very quiet atmosphere. While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Candy just stares at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Candy can think about is his dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel. Tension is also created by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the atmosphere of the room leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, meaning the shot will be heard by Candy. This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the room because no one is quite sure as to how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the room by telling Candy that he can have one of his puppies.

Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them pups he wants.” However, Candy refuses to acknowledge his offer, strengthening the already tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse. How Does Steinbeck Create Tension in Chapter Three in Of Mice and Men Steinbeck creates tension by making the atmosphere before Curley’s dog gets shot very awkward. He does this by writing about how small noises draw everyone’s attention in the room to it: “He rippled the edge of the deck nervously, and the little snapping noise drew the eyes of all men in the room, so that he stopped doing it.” This quote gives a sense of tension, since tiny things like rippling cards can drew everyone’s attention. This makes it seem like a very quiet atmosphere.

While everyone’s attention is drawn to the small sounds, Candy just stares at the ceiling and eventually rolls over. This makes the reader feel that all Candy can think about is his dog being shot, and this also brings a tense feel. Tension is also created by Steinbeck using the word ‘silence’ to describe the atmosphere of the room leading up to the dog being shot. The characters do not want the silence present, meaning the shot will be heard by Candy. This will increase the awkward atmosphere in the room because no one is quite sure as to how Candy can be comforted. Slim tries to break the silence in the room by telling Candy that he can have one of his puppies. Slim tells Candy that he “can have any of them pups he wants.” However, Candy refuses to acknowledge his offer, strengthening the already tense atmosphere in the bunkhouse.


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