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Mesopotamia Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Egypt and Mesopotamia Comparison

Egypt and Mesopotamia not only differed in their trade and culture, but also in their politics and form of government. Despite the differences though, one is able to notice several similarities between the two civilizations. First of all, Mesopotamia was ruled by kings and queens and nobles could usually attain power as they attained a higher economic status. In Egypt, it was the pharaohs who the authoritive power. In Mesopotamia, the state also had supreme power in the economy and agricultural affairs. Pharaohs were the supreme judges and law makers, as were kings in Mesopotamia. They did have advisors and religion influenced their policies, for example, religion in Egypt is the bureaucracy and actions as did in Mesopotamian civilizations. An…

Egypt and Mesopotamia

Almost all things have its identified origin. The society that presently exists also has its beginnings that could be rooted from the ancient civilization. These civilizations became the foundation of the modern world that is presently observable. Two of the most notable ancient civilizations are that of Egypt and Mesopotamia. The Egyptian civilization progress in one of the largest arid desert areas in the world that is even larger than the whole Europe. This became possible due to the River Nile that crosses a nearly rainless desert from south to north that carries the waters of Lake Victoria as far as 3,000 miles of the Mediterranean Sea. In relation with Egypt’s strategic location, its organization is not simply attributed from…

The Code of Hammurabi

The document I chose is The Code of Hammurabi, which is a code of laws for the Ancient Mesopotamia civilization. It was not the first Mesopotamian law, but it is the most famous and most complete. The Code of Hammurabi was written in cuneiform has been translated and authenticated by experts; therefore it is reliable. The complete Code of Hammurabi contains 282 laws and is written on the “Stele of Hammurabi,” a huge, phallic shaped piece of diorite. Hammurabi, the ruler of the first metropolis in Babylon, wrote the Code of Hammurabi. As all societies need laws, Hammurabi wrote the code of laws to establish order and to dictate punishment for crimes in Mesopotamian society. Hammurabi was an intelligent man…

The Ziggurat

Mesopotamia, or “the land between two rivers,” was the base that civilizations built themselves on. It was also the stage where many of them crumbled. The rich culture and religion of Mesopotamia included many gods and goddesses, whom many of these were strongly associated with the forces of nature. The Mesopotamians sought a way that would bring them closer to their gods and goddesses, and they did so by building great structures called Ziggurats. A Ziggurat is a pyramidal structure mainly composed of mud bricks. The word “ziggurat” stems from the ancient Akkadian word “ziqqurratum” which was developed from the verb zqaru, which translated is ‘to be high’ (The British Museum). The Mesopotamians believed that, by building these grand structures,…

The Oval Temple at Khafaje

“Discuss critically important architectural principles and urban layouts in Mesopotamia between 4th and 2nd millennia B. C. , citing specifically The Oval Temple at Khafaje. Furthermore, consider how the cultural values of the Protoliterate period were reflected in the architecture and spatial qualities of the time and site. ” Corresponding to modern-day Iraq, the north eastern section of Syria and to a lesser extent south eastern Turkey and smaller parts of south western Iran, Mesopotamia situated between the Tigris and Euphrates river systems (fig. 1). A gulf was formed from a deeper penetrating sea line in earlier geographical periods, creating a plain of silt deposits that spanned the area between the two rivers, eventually populated by the Akkadians in the…

Geographic features of Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia is considered to be the cradle of civilization. The word Mesopotamia has a Greek origin and means a “land between two rivers. ”The name refers to area between Euphrates and Tigris and its tributaries. It roughly comprises modern Iraq and part of Syria. The climate of the region is semi-arid with a vast desert expanse in the north. The rains in the region are also irregular hence rain-fed agriculture was difficult in ancient Mesopotamia. Worse still, portions of land farther from the water were dry and largely uninhabitable and not arable. And since the geography of Mesopotamia is such that agriculture is possible only with irrigation and good drainage, Sumerians and Akkadians built their cities along the Tigris and…

Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia

The last great Ice Age not only influenced our planets climate and geology but also the migration of humans and their settlement to create vast civilizations. Upon these civilizations lied Mesopotamia, known as the “cradle of civilization,” and Ancient Egypt. These two civilizations flourished in their primitive times due to their political, social, and cultural advancements. Sharing many qualities of each other as people, these two societies were also exceedingly different, as are most cultures. Both Mesopotamia and Ancient Egypt became known as some of the most powerful and influential civilizations known to man. The world’s first civilization was derived from Mesopotamia and inhabited by the Sumerians. Ancient Mesopotamia was located between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The Sumerians were…

Mesopotamia and the Indus River Valley

Throughout the ages; societies around the world have been compared and contrasted, this is due to the growing interests of the human mind. Although the Indus River Valley was complex and exceptionally organized due to it’s agricultural opportunities, Mesopotamia serves as a more remarkable society. Known for being the ‘cradle of civilization’, Mesopotamia formed a benchmark as the most ancient highly developed society. While Mesopotamia was the most dominant society to come at such an early time, the Indus River Valley also housed an ideal location susceptible for great agricultural advancements and options for humans. It is said that the development of the Mesopotamian society began around 5300 B.C. because of the clashing of urban societies. Around 3300 B.C., the…

Which Mesopotamian Empire Accomplished the Most?

As a world famous historian, I have been asked to prepare a report for this conference about which Mesopotamian empire accomplished the most. My years studying the history of the ancient world have made me the perfect candidate for the job. My opinion is that the Babylonian Empire accomplished the most out of all of the Mesopotamian empires. The Babylonian Empire, under the rule of King Hammurabai, created laws to unify his empire and preserve order. This set an example for the rest of the world’s civilizations to copy. He achieved this by developing his code of laws. Through these laws, he also gave certain rights to the under-represented citizens of Mesopotamia, the women and slaves. These were the first…

What Makes A Civilization Successful?

There are many factors that make a civilization great. Some of the factors that make a civilization successful do not only include an efficient government, but a flourished environment. It must contain a great source of food. Which is very crucial to the sustaining of a civilization being a necessity. A good geographical area is key. A good area would include availability to water, which in turn would help with the growing of crops. When water is available a source of food should be constant. Water is a necessity when it comes to growing crops or any plants. Plants use most of the water they get form the soil for transpiration, but a portion of the water taken in is…