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Manufacturing Beauty and the Truth behind Cindy Jackson Essay

Cindy Jackson earned her title in the Guinness Book of Records as the one that had the most number of plastic surgeries in the world. According to source, she spent almost US$100,000 in plastic surgery since 1988. As being reflected in her life, it appears that the theme of manufacturing beauty centers on having a self that lingers on the concept that hope creates dreams, and dreams creates the absolute pursuit of these that center more on the purpose of giving joy to oneself instead of other people.

Thus, giving joy to others requires joy from within that, when it bursts, reaches other people in the community that, in turn, solidifies the manufacturing beauty that goes back again to hope. It follows a cycling pattern. Manufacturing Beauty and the Truth behind Cindy Jackson Cindy Jackson earned her title in the Guinness Book of World Records as the one that had the most number of plastic surgeries in the world (Cindy Jackson, 2005). According to source, she spent almost US$100,000 since the year 1988 (Cindy Jackson, 2005), which means that she started taking plastic surgery when she was at the age of 33.

Born in Ohio the year 1955 (Cindy Jackson, 2005), she later on focused more on reinventing her face—specifically the eyelids, lips, nose, cheek, teeth, jaw-line, and chin—as well as her knees, thighs, abdomen, waist, breast, plus a number of hair transplantation, partial dermabrasions, chemical peels, laser resurfacings, facial thread vein removal, mole removal, scar revision, semi-permanent and permanent make-up, as well as the use of temporary filler injections (Cindy Jackson, 2005). By 2003, her 48-year-old image looked like twenty years younger. But who is Cindy Jackson?

What constitutes her social self? What is her self-concept? And what goes beneath her marvelous self-esteem and self-presentation? In the world of the manufacturing beauty, how does public image affect her? These are the topics that would be presented in the following pages. Main Body: Social Self, Attractiveness, and the Mass Media Cindy’s sense of social self Cindy’s sense of social self started with the concept that, behind her small and sheltered life, there was another life waiting for her away from the Midwest. As she narrated, I grew up in a small Ohio farming community.

My father was a farmer-turned- inventor from Indiana and my mother was a Kentucky coal-miner’s daughter… In addition to our extremely unusual home life, we had a very sheltered and isolated upbringing. Feeling like a complete misfit, I always knew there was another life waiting for me far away from the cornfields of the Midwest. (Jackson, 2008) She did not lose hope despite her simple life but continued to pursue her dreams, even when she was a teenager and was never popular in school. She turned her attention to art and photography and pursued to know more about them during her college years.

From here it is evident that Cindy’s self-concept was to pursue what would best make her happy, which became her cornerstone to a social self that was extravagantly vibrant, with high self-esteem. Nowadays, she proclaims that she has had such an extraordinary life (Jackson, 2008) Cindy’s physical attractiveness The seeds of physical attractiveness started when Cindy was only six years old and her parents bought her a Barbie doll that, according to her, “… served to fuel [her] escapist fantasies” (Jackson, 2008). She mentioned that, while she played, in her imagination was a life that was gorgeously happy and glamorous.

Cindy mentioned that, “Through Barbie I could glimpse an alternative destiny” (Jackson, 2008). Through her sense of physical attractiveness and the need to improve and revitalize it, her self-presentation improved all the more, especially when she became a band member and began to sing rock songs with a bohemian appearance that attracted countless eyes in London. Interpersonal attraction played a key role in her pursuit of her living dream, making her see and live the physical attractiveness stereotype, which revealed to her the conclusion that women ought to have beautiful, finely-shaped face and body.

Thus, she created a plan on improving the following areas of her body: (1) eyes that are larger, less tired-looking; (2) nose that is small and feminine; (3) cheekbones that are high; (4) lips that are fuller and better-shaped; (5) teeth that are perfect and white; (6) jaw and chin that are smaller, more delicate; (7) complexion that is flawless; (8) stomach that is flat and defined; as well as (9) thighs and knees that are thinner and slimmer, among others (Jackson, 2008). This image she tried her best to pursue to enhance interpersonal attraction starting the age 33. Cindy and the mass media

Mass media for Cindy became her ladder to success. From her rock band during the ‘80s, little by little she became more popular in her acting and modeling career, with pictures of her posing next to country legend Rhinestone Cowboy or Beach Boy Glen Campbell. She had pictures with friends in the movie, music, and modeling industries, such as Hollywood star Stefanie Powers, Michael Jackson, and Ursula Andress. She also starred in the Howard Stern Show, spent time with pals Charlie Harper of the UK Subs and Knox of The Vibrators, and even with politicians like Mayor Boris Johnson in London.

Only this year, she was being featured in newspapers and magazines, as the Guinness World Records 2009 launched her in London as the one with the “Most Cosmetic Procedures” (Jackson, 2008). These basically show that Cindy’s life, since the start of her career, revolved around the mass media. Conclusion: Manufacturing Beauty As being reflected in the life of Cindy Jackson, it appears that the theme of manufacturing beauty centers on having a self that lingers on the concept that hope creates dreams, and dreams creates the absolute pursuit of these that center more on the purpose of giving joy to oneself instead of other people.

Thus, giving joy to others requires joy from within that, when it bursts, reaches other people in the community that, in turn, solidifies the manufacturing beauty that goes back again to hope. It follows a cycling pattern. As final cliche, Jen Chamberlain wrote what manufacturing beauty really means: Realistically, there is probably no one reason why people reconstruct their bodies to fit the ideal image of each age… The fact that this phenomenon is getting more national attention today is a wonderful and necessary step towards helping people see the beauty within. (Chamberlain, 2002)

References

Chamberlain, J. (2002). Manufacturing beauty: a sojourn into the history of body modification. Retrieved December 6, 2008, from http://www. ithaca. edu/buzzsaw/0402beauty. htm. Cindy Jackson. (2005). Retrieved December 6, 2008, from http://www. nationmaster. com/encyclopedia/Cindy-Jackson. Jackson, C. (2008). Cindy Jackson. Retrieved December 6, 2008, from http://www. cindyjackson. com/index. html.


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