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Loyalty and deceit Essay

Book Two of Don Quixoted used to be a separate volume but was later merged into one with the first. An author named Avellaneda wrote an unauthorized version of the book. An irate Cervantes used the pirated version in his sequel. The second book is more serious in the manner in which it tackles the subject of deception. Playing true to character, in the second installment Don Quixote is as gullible and endearing character as in the first book. Don Quixote’s unbridled imagination gets him to trouble as usual and makes him the butt of jokes by wealthy patrons.

Sancho’s loyalty to Don Quixote sometimes forces him to resort to deception. For instance, when Don Quixoted travelled to Taboso to visit his intended Dulcinea, Sancho tries to convince him that one of the three peasnat girls they met while traveling as Dulcinea and her ladies-in-waiting. When the Don refutes and says he sees only three peasant girls, Sancho deceives him into thinking that he suffers from a cruel spell which blinds him from the truth. Since Don Quixote cannot distinguish fact from fiction, he theorizes that the enchanters transformed Dulcinea into an ugly peasant girl.

Undoing the spell on Dulcinea becoms the chief goal for Quixote in his journeys. A friend Samson Carrasco disguised as the Knight of the Mirrors so he can beat him in a swords fight so they could force him to go home safely. Unfortunately, the Don wins the duel. So Quixote and Sancho pressed on to continue their journey. Later, Don Quixote accepts an invitation to the unnamed Duke and Duchess’s palace. From Chapters XXX through LVII talks about Don Quixote and Sancho’s interactions with the Duke and Duchess. The duke and duchess accept the duo into their abode.

Despite the formers’ encouragement to make them relax, Quixote and Sancho feel more uncomfortable than ever. Even if the duke and duchess appears to be social superior, their actions in these chapters reflect their shallow morality. By commanding their servants to look after Quixote and Sancho’s needs, feelings of animosity are aroused. Perhaps brought about by jealousy. The invitation extended by the duke and duchess to the cluleless Quixote and Sancho actually signals the start of an elaborate scheme to deliberately deceive the two in order to make fun of them.

The duke and duchess are also abusing the help in order to carry out their cruel intents. These make them morally reprehensible and spiritualy inferior to the common classes. Don quixote fails to grasp the deception behind the duke and duchess’ actions. He was painfully unaware of the extended humiliation he is being subjected to in the guise of friendship. In Chapter XXXIII, Sancho Panza boldly declares to the duchess that believes that his master is a mad man. When asked why he continues to stay with him, he says that he truly cares for Quixote. He stays out of loyalty. He also worries about Don Quixote’s safety.

These are probably the most telling lines of the story. Sancho, in his utter simplicity, proves to be compassionate and virtuous. Unlike Quixote who seems to be lost in his own world. Quixote may be virtuous but he is ignorant in the ways of men. The Duke and Duchess poke fun at Don Quixote making him a public spectacle. The conspiracy doesn’t end with Quixote but extends to Sancho as well. They pretend to come up with the antidote to Dulcinea’s enchantment even if the know the story is false by claiming that if Sancho whips himself 3,300 times, Dulcinea will go back to her old self.

Don Quixote and Sancho’s adventure orchestrated by the Duke and Duchess include flying a wooden horse to slay a giant who turned the princes and her lover into metal figurines. The Duke and Duchess even arrange Sancho to govern the Island of Barataria. Sancho eventually attains what Quixote promises to him – to become governor. The imaginary island governorship bestowed by the duke and duchess enables Sancho to act out his fantasy of ruling a fictitious island. Even if what transpired is an elaborate ruse, Sancho proves to be an able ruler, very much capable of dispensing his job.

His wisdom and realistic approach in solving the different problems presented to him made the townsfolk admire him. Sancho’s rule is short-lived though as he realizes after he got wounded in a make-believe battle arranged by the Duke and Duchess that he is happier as a laborer. Even if his talent for leadership caught everyone by surprise, Sancho chooses to renounce the life of a feudal governor and turns his back on the the elaborate prank played by the Duke and Duchess in a courageous demonstration of loyalty to Don Quixote.

The arrogance of the Duke and the Duchess in the Second Part merely highlights the arrogance of class distinctions and sheer callousness of people from the upper class. Sancho and Teresa Panza’s wisdom which is highlighted at the end of the novel shows that old-fashioned goodness and wisdom from the common people still emerges victorious even in a world of full of deceit and cruelty. Don Quixote and Sancho’s truth and sincerity prevail over the Duke and Duchess’ fraud, deceit and malice. Sancho’s genuine service and loyalty turns him from Quixote’s servant to a good friend. Bibliography:

Gradesaver, Don Quixote book ii study guide, 2009, 19 April 2009, <http://www. gradesaver. com/don-quixote-book-ii/study-guide/section9/> Don Quixote Virtual Museum, Don Quixote: the story, 2009, retrieved 19 April 2009, <http://www. donquijote. org/vmuseum/Quixote-story/book-two. asp> Sparknotes, Don Quixote, 2009, retrieved 19 April 2009, <http://www. sparknotes. com/lit/donquixote/section14. rhtml> Enotes, Don Quixote, http://www. enotes. com/literary-criticism/don-quixote-de-la-mancha-miguel-de-cervantes Wikipedia, Don Quixote, 2009, retrieved 19 April 2009, <http://en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Don_Quixote>

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