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Library System Essay

Dedication I am heartily thankful to my Supervisor, Mrs. Lara C. Vidanes, whose encouragement guidance and support, from the initial to the final level enabled me to develop an understanding of the subject. Finally, to Our Almighty God Jesus Christ, forgiving us strength, knowledge and ability to exert effort. My group mates for sharing ideas for the memories we spend together. To my inspiration Mama and Papa for always being there for me thank you for the Love, support in case of my financial needs. Lastly, I offer my regards instructor and blessings to all. L. D.

C I humbly dedicate this work to all the people who helped me accomplished my duties. My parents, Manuel and Alegria Belga forgiving me financial support and letting us to mess around our house, My BULABOG friends, Let, Ian, Ate Jem, Yeng, Rhen, Sandra and Ichel for cheering me up and encouraging me to finish this work. My group mates, Diane, Woody, Demi and Joana, for sharing ideas for improving our work and for the memories that we’ve shared together. Mrs. Lara C. Vidanes, for guiding us on making our baby thesis. And most specially, Our Almighty God for giving us strength, and knowledge.

C. D. B First of all I would like to thank my lovable and sweet adviser, Mrs. Lara C. Vidanes for her support to develop my skills and knowledge in Computer. From the initial to the final level she always do her best to teach us, to have an idea in every lesson and laboratories activity in our subject. Finally, to our dearest Father in Heaven that give us all of the blessings, knowledge, and good health he always there us to guide and care. And especially to my parents, they always there for me if I have a financial problem. Thank you for all the concern in our subject. G. W. J. B

I want to express our gratitude to all the people who given their heart whelming full support during completion of the project. To God the father of all, we thank for the strength and for the hope that keep us believing. We also wanted to thank keep us believing. We also wanted to thank our finally supported. To giving us not just financial, but morally and spiritually. To Riyadh Mavell Maglanoc for my inspiration, to our group mates who willingly helped us gather the necessary information. And last but not the least is our ever loving adviser, Mrs. Lara Vidanes. J. M. B First, I would like to thank to Mrs.

Lara C. Vidanes who given her heart and whelming full support. To my beloved family who inspired, encouraged and fully supported us in every trial that comes our way. Most especially to our God Father in heaven that giving us Blessings, knowledge and skills. D. B Contents Chapter 1: The Problem and Its Background A. Introduction……………………………………………………………. 1 B. School Background…………………………………………………… 2 Organizational Chart………………………………………………….. 5 Tanay National High School Mission, Vision, & Philosophy …. …. 7 Library Rules and Regulations……………………………. …………. 8 C. System Background…………………………………….. ………..

…… 10 D. Statement of the Problem………………………………………… ……10 E. Objectives………………………………………………………… ……. 10 F. Scope and Delimitation of the Study………………………. …. ……10 G. Hypothesis……………………………………………………. ….. ……10 H. Significance of the Study………………………………….. …….. ……11 I. Definition of Terms………………………………………. …………….. 12 J. Conceptual Framework…………………………………………. …….. 13 K. Theoretical Framework………………………………………………… 13 Chapter 2: Review of Related Literature and Studies A. Local……………………………………………………………………. 14 B. Foreign…………………………………………………………………. 24 Chapter 3: Methodology A. Research Design………………………………………………………

30 B. Data Gathering and Procedures……………………………………. 30 C. Gantt Chart……………………………………………………………. 31 D. Proposed Letter………………………………………………………. 32 E. Interview………………………………………………………………. 33 F. Data Flow Diagram……………………………………………………36 G. Statistical Treatment of Data…………………………………………37 H. Graphical Presentation……………………………………………….. 40 Chapter 4: Presentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Data A. Cost and Benefit Analysis……………………………………………. 42 Chapter 5: Summary, Recommendation and Conclusion A. Summary……………………………………………………………. 43 B. Conclusion………………………………………………………….. 43 C. Recommendation………………………………………………….. 43

Appendix A. Screen Layout………………………………………………………45 B. Program Coding……………………………………………………. 48 C. Survey……………………………………………………………….. 191 D. Personal Profile……………………………………………………. 224 E. Photographic Documentation…………………………………….. 229 Bibliography Chapter I The Problem and its Background Introduction Throughout this book, we introduce and explain the concepts and the application by using a simple Library system. We choose a Library System, because most readers know the basic functionality of a Library. Most people have been customers of Library and searched for a book, borrowed a book, and returned a book.

As a result, they have an understanding of the elements managed by such a system. A book may be modeled as a class with attributes such as title, author, status, price, and last borrower. We will briefly introduce the Library example including a description of the system structure, its behavior, and the data structures managed by Library System. Schools set the various pedagogical changes to achieve the current level of education in other countries. Because of the growing numbers of computer users, this became an effective medium to demonstrate the knowledge and skills of the students.

From the traditional searching process for the books in the libraries, the interactive usage of computers can be now addressed as part of the library system. School Background Tanay National High School was formerly called Tanay Public High School which opened in June 1989 with three hundred twenty five (325) students and seven (7) teachers. It started as Tanay Free High School under the umbrella of RCAT extension services. In 1990, it was transformed in Tanay National High School with 1,637 students, and 63 teachers who got no salary for one (1) year, under the underlying leadership of Dr.

Filemon Porciuncula. In 1991 the Division office of Rizal assigned Mr. Glicerio Castaneda, ES 1-IA to be the Officer-in-Charge, Tanay National High School was formerly opened, hand in hand with the energetic assistance of Congressman Egmidio Tanjuatco Jr. , with the clamor and request of the townspeople of Tanay who cannot afford to send their children to private school. It was only during this time that the sacrifices and efforts of the teachers were compensated, they received their first salary. But as they say nothing is permanent in this world.

In early months of 1992, Mr. Glicerio Castaneda has to go back to his assignment at the Division Office. It was also during this time that the “woman” in the person of Mrs. Corazon S. Laserna was promoted principal and assigned at Tanay National High School. With her dynamic leadership and supervision, the school garnered numerous achievements, awards, citations in the district, division, regional and national levels both in academic and extra-curricular activities. With Mrs. Laserna’s time the site and buildings of Tanay National High School were established.

Tanay National High School is endowed and blessed with school building facilities and through the joint efforts of the national fundings and government projects and the provincial officials of Rizal. With the promotion of Mrs. Corazon S. Laserna at Antipolo National High School, Miss Juana Garrovillas was assigned as principal of Tanay National High School from Angono National High School on May of 2002. On the same year, Miss Garrovillas was promoted and she was replaced by Mrs. Loida R. Alcantara, during this time Tanay became the host of “Araw ng Lalawigan.

” The profusion of the Hydroponics’ Technology in school, the construction of the mini-replica of Calinauan Cave and the construction of the Governor Rebecca “Nini” Ynares building. With the promotions of the different school heads, on December 2, 2003, Mr. Morado B. Digma was assigned as Principal I of Tanay National High School. With the transparent and synergetic administration, the Kaunlaran Center II was constructed to meet the needs of the students for extra-work study center, review center rolled into one function hall.

The roofing of the pathways from the gate to the buildings was materialized so students will not get wet in going to their rooms during rainy seasons. Supported by the town Mayor Ricardo A. Tanjuatco and the District Supervisor Mr. Albert Delos Santos, Mr. Morado Digma fulfilled Barangay Sta. Ines’ dream come true in having a secondary school in the upland community, with the approval of Dr. Edith a. Doblada, the Schools Division Superintendent of Rizal in the year of 2005, 17th of July. Upon the promotion of Mr. Morado B. Digma on May 17, 2006 at Gen.

Licerio Geronimo Memorial National High School at Rodriguez, Rizal, Mr. Leoncio L. Gervacio was assigned as Principal III of Tanay National High School. With his fatherly administration, blessings poured at Tanay National High School, the uncountable awards and achievements of students in the different activities both in academic and extra-curricular in the Division, Regional and National levels. Mentors of Tanay National High School attended different workshops, seminars, and trainings for the improvement of the teaching-learning process.

Through his effort, promotions of some teachers were simultaneously materialized from Teacher I to Teacher II, III and Master Teachers. Two mentors finished their doctorate degree, Dr. Teresita A. Cruz and Dr. Joseph M. Tongohan who died in September 2007. Mrs. Lerma Labrador-Flandez was promoted as Head Teacher III and was assigned at Pantay, Teresa as Head Teacher, while Mr. Buddy Chester M. Repia was then promoted as ICT Coordinator and was assigned at the Division Office. It was also during Mr.

Gervacio’s time that the IA Building and Gymnasium were constructed to cater the student’s needs in conducting their activities. Furthermore, extended High Schools in Tanay Like Marciana P. Catolos Memorial National High School and Jesus S. Yujuico Memorial National High School were brought forth to decongest the over growing population of Tanay National High School and reach out services to those students who were living far from Tanay NHS. Again, another set of teachers were promoted last January 2010 from Teacher I to Teacher II, III and Head Teacher III.

To date, Tanay National High School continues to work hand in hand with the people who worked and sacrificed to make Tanay National High School what it is now. Pricipals may come and go, but Tanay National High School will continue to do its mission and fulfill its vision set fo the students – produce fruitful, disciplined and successful citizens. TNHS VISION TANAY NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL is a committed institution that adheres to the thrusts of public secondary education of developing academically, technically excellent and value-oriented citizens.

TNHS MISSION TANAY NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL shall produce academically, technically competent, responsible and morally upright students who are responsive to the changing world. TNHS PHILOSOPHY TANAY NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL is a school guided by principles and guidelines according to the department of Education, molding students to be productive in the field of sports, technical skills spiritual upliftment and academic excellence. Tanay National High School Library Rules and Regulations 1. The Library is open from 8:00 to 4:00 P. M. Monday, Thursday, Friday. 2.

The following are authorized to use the Library. – TNHS Administrator, teachers and students. – Employees or TNHS. – Visiting users/researches 3. Procedure in borrowing and returning of materials. – Borrowing: Monday to Wednesday, 8:00 A. M. – 4:00 P. M. – Returning: Thursday to Friday, 8:00 A. M. – 4:00 P. M. 4. A Borrower’s card is required in borrowing Library materials. 5. Books and other Library materials should be handled with care, They are to serve a great number of users. 6. Encyclopedias, dictionaries, newspapers and journals are to be head only in the Library.

7. A lost book while on loan must be reported immediately to the librarian. A lost book must be replaced with the same title after a week it was reported lost. 8. Users caught bringing out Library materials without permission shall be dealt with appropriate action. 9. Students should never commit violations such as hiding or stealing books or other Library property, tearing pages of books or periodicals. 10. In order not to annoy any other Library patrons such activities like eating, sleeping and doing industrial projects are not permitted.

Loud conversations are prohibited. System Background TNHS is using manual system since 1994. This system is the traditional way of recording files, using pen and paper. Where every detail should be written on and kept in their specified space for records. When a student enters in the Library, he/she enter and leave the Library. If he/she is going to borrow a book, he/she will write the information in his/her Library card and will be signed by the Librarian. Statement of the Problem This study is aimed to answer the following questions:

1. What are the advantages and benefits of the proposed system over the existing system? 2. How does the proposed system works? 3. Is this more convenient to use than to their old system? 4. Can this proposed system stand-alone? Objectives To develop a computerized system that will help the school to improve their Library operation in recording, filing and better organized all the data and information about the student and for the book borrowed. Scope and Delimitation of the Study The study focused on the Library Catalog System.

It includes Login, adding, deleting and searching books students/users. Hypothesis There is a significant effect of the proposed system over the existing system. Significance of the Study Since this research study will deal on the Library System, the researchers firmly believe that this study will be of great significance and help to: 1. The Librarian and staff from Tanay National High School, because it could help them to understand with the computerized system we are conducting.

2. Student and the teachers from Tanay National High School, because it will help them to understand with the computerized system for the easy way recording of the student and Book information. 3. The students of AICS, to familiarize and be able to understand better all the strategies and techniques of the Computerized System. 4. Other school that has computer in their Library, because it could help them to understand the system and for not to indicate every details of the filing folder thus, could avoid unnecessary incident, like lost of the records. Definition of Terms.

Librarian – a professional person trained in library science and engaged in library services Manual – Worked by hand, not automatically or electronically System – A set of connected things or parts forming a complex whole, in particular Library – A building or room containing collections of books, periodicals, and sometimes films and recorded music for people to read, borrow, or refer to Catalog – A complete list of items, typically one in alphabetical or other systematic order, in particular Advance – A development or improvement.

Dewey Decimal System – Dewey decimal classification: a system used by libraries to classify nonfictional publications into subject categories; the subject is indicated by a three-digit numeral and further specification is given by numerals following a decimal point; publications are shelved by number Logon – A combination of a user’s identification and password used to enter a computer; The process of logging on User – A person who uses or operates something, esp.

a computer or other machine Password – A secret word or phrase that must be used to gain admission to something Student number – A student number is the number assigned to a student upon first entering or registering with an educational institution and is used to identify the student in lieu of a name for grades, essays, projects, exams and official documents. Library System – A library classification is a system of coding and organizing library materials (books, serials, audiovisual materials, computer files, maps, manuscripts, realia) according to their subject and allocating a call number to that information resource.

Log Book – Systematic daily or hourly record of activities, events, and/or occurrences. Conceptual Framework Theoretical Framework Writing in the Log book is the input stage where in you’ll write the time you go in and out in the Library. Once he/she input all the information, he/she can browse on the books available on the library, which represent on the process stage. At completion, the record in the file folder that you borrowed book in the Library. CHAPTER II Review of Related Literature and Studies Local Literature.

The National Library of the Philippines (Filipino: Pambansang Aklatan ng Pilipinas, Spanish: Biblioteca Nacional de Filipinas, formerly the National Library of the Philippine Islands and abbreviated NLP) is the official national library of the Philippines. The complex is located in Ermita on a portion of Rizal Park facing T. M. Kalaw Avenue, neighboring culturally significant buildings such as the National Archives of the Philippines and the National Historical Institute. Like its neighbors, it is under the jurisdiction of the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA).

The library is notable for being the home of the original copies of the defining works of Jose Rizal: Noli Me Tangere, El Filibusterismo and Mi ultimo adios. Beginnings (1887-1900) The National Library of the Philippines can trace its history to the establishment of the Museo-Biblioteca de Filipinas (Museum-Library of the Philippines), established by a royal order of the Spanish government on August 12, 1887. It opened on October 24, 1891 at the Casa de la Moneda in Intramuros, then home of the Philippine Mint, with around 100 volumes and with both Julian Romero and Benito Perdiguero as director and archivist-librarian, respectively.

Romero resigned in 1893 and was briefly replaced by Tomas Torres of the Escuela de Artes y Oficios in Bacolor, Pampanga (now the Don Honorio Ventura College of Arts and Trades), who in turn was replaced by Don Pedro A. Paterno on March 31, 1894. By that time, the library had moved to a site in Quiapo near the present site of the Masjid Al-Dahab. Later on, Paterno published the first issue of the Boletin del Museo-Biblioteca de Filipinas (Bulletin of the Museum-Library of the Philippines) on January 15, 1895.

The Museo-Biblioteca was abolished upon the onset of the American colonization of the Philippines. By the time of its abolition, the library held around 1,000 volumes and averaged around 25-30 visitors a day. The entire collection would later be transferred at Paterno’s expense to his own private library, of which some books would form the basis for the Filipiniana collection of subsequent incarnations of the National Library. The Legislative Building on Padre Burgos Street in Ermita would serve as the National Library’s home from 1928 to 1944.

As the Philippine-American War died down and peace gradually returned to the Philippines, Americans who had come to settle in the islands saw the need for a wholesome recreational outlet. Recognizing this need, Charles Greenleaf and several other American women organized the American Circulating Library (ACL), dedicated in memory of American soldiers who died in the Philippine-American War. The ACL opened on March 9, 1900 with 1,000 volumes donated by the Red Cross Society of California and other American organizations.

By 1901, the ACL’s collection grew to 10,000 volumes, consisting mostly of American works of fiction, periodicals and newspapers. The rapid expansion of the library proved to be such a strain on the resources of the American Circulating Library Association of Manila, the organization running the ACL, that it was decided that the library’s entire collection should be donated to the government. The Philippine Commission formalized the acceptance of the ACL’s collections on March 5, 1901 through Act No. 96, today observed as the birthdate of both the National Library and the Philippine public library system.

With the ACL now a Philippine government institution, a board of trustees and three personnel, led by librarian Nelly Y. Egbert, were appointed by the colonial government. At the same time, the library moved to Rosario Street (now Quintin Paredes Street) in Binondo before its expansion warranted its move to the Hotel de Oriente in the same district in 1904. It was noted in the 1905 annual report of the Department of Public Instruction (the current Department of Education) that the new location “was not exactly spacious but at least it was comfortable and accessible by tramway from almost every part of the city”.

At the same time, the ACL, acting on its mandate to make its collections available to American servicemen stationed in the Philippines, established five traveling libraries, serving various, if not unusual, clientele across the islands. In November 1905, Act No. 1407 placed the library under the Bureau of Education and subsequently moved to its headquarters at the corner of Cabildo (now Muralla) and Recoletos Streets in Intramuros, on which today the offices of the Manila Bulletin stand. On June 2, 1908, Act No. 1849 was passed, mandating the consolidation of all government libraries in the Philippines into the ACL.

Subsequently, Act No. 1935 was passed in 1909, renaming the ACL the Philippine Library and turning it into an autonomous body governed by a five-member Library Board. At the same time, the Act mandated the division of the library into four divisions: the law, scientific, circulating and Filipiniana divisions. The newly-renamed library was headed by James Alexander Robertson, an American scholar who, in collaboration with Emma Helen Blair, wrote The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, and recognized today as both the first director of the modern National Library and the father of Philippine library science.

Robertson would later abolish the library’s subscription fees for books in general circulation in 1914. Act No. 2572, passed on January 31, 1916, merged the Philippine Library with two other government institutions: the Division of Archives, Patents, Copyrights and Trademarks (later to become the National Archives, the Copyright Office of the National Library and the Intellectual Property Office) and the Law Library of the Philippine Assembly, forming the Philippine Library and Museum.

In addition, the Philippine Library and Museum was placed under the supervision of the Department of Justice. However, on December 7, 1928, Act No. 3477 was passed, splitting the Philippine Library and Museum into the National Library and the National Museum (now the National Museum of the Philippines). The newly-formed National Library was placed under the supervision of the Philippine Assembly, subsequently moving to the Legislative Building on Padre Burgos Street in Ermita. This arrangement continued with the convocation of the National Assembly at the dawn of the Commonwealth era in 1935.

However, supervision of the National Library would return to the Department of Public Instruction in 1936. The dawn of World War II and the subsequent invasion of the Philippines by the Japanese had no significant impact on the National Library, with the institution still remaining open and the government at the time making few significant changes to the library, such as the abolition of the Research and Bibliography Division and the subsequent suspension of work on the national bibliography in 1941.

However, by late 1944, with the impending campaign of combined American and Filipino forces to recapture the Philippines, Japanese forces stationed in Manila began setting up fortifications in large buildings, including the Legislative Building. Despite the occupation of the Legislative Building, the Japanese commanding officer permitted library officials to vacate the premises within two weeks of their occupation, with the library subsequently moving into the building housing the Philippine Normal School (now the Philippine Normal University).

Two weeks later, however, Japanese troops also moved to occupy that building as well, with the same commanding officer giving library officials only until that afternoon to vacate the premises. All collections of the National Library were moved into a 1. 5-cubic meter vault under the Manila City Hall, the closest building at the time. However, most of the library’s Filipiniana collection, having been overlooked by moving staff and due to time constraints, was left behind at the Philippine Normal School.

The Battle of Manila would prove to be disastrous to the cultural patrimony of the Philippines and the collections of the National Library in particular. Most of the library’s collections were either destroyed by fires as a result of the ensuing battle between American, Filipino and Japanese forces, lost or stolen by looters afterward. Pieces lost from the library’s collections included an urn where Andres Bonifacio’s remains were stored, as well as valuable Filipiniana pieces such as some of the manuscripts of Jose Rizal.

Of the 733,000 volumes the library had in its collections prior to World War II, only 36,600 remained. However, luckily for library officials, a locked box containing the “crown jewels” of the National Library: the original copies of Rizal’s Noli Me Tangere, El Filibusterismo and Mi ultimo adios, was left intact. Tiburcio Tumaneng, then the chief of the Filipiniana Division, described the event as a happy occasion. “I looked around for the other box and I found it covered by a big steel cabinet which I could not lift so I only fished for the lock and found it intact.

I was very happy because I knew that this second box contained the original manuscripts of the Noli, the Fili and the Ultimo Adios. ” Word of the books’ discovery by Tumaneng was relayed to Professor H. Otley Beyer, then chairman of the Committee on Salvage of Government Libraries, through officer-in-charge Luis Montilla. Having found a new sense of optimism after the books’ discovery, Beyer and a group of volunteers began scouring the ruins of the Legislative Building and the Philippine Normal School for any and all books they could find.

However, much to their surprise, the entire collection stored under Manila City Hall disappeared, lost to looters who ransacked the ruins of public buildings. All salvaged materials were brought back to Beyer’s residence on Aviles Street, near Malacanang Palace. With the return of Commonwealth rule, the National Library reopened and relocated to the site of the Old Bilibid Prison (today the Manila City Jail) on Oroquieta Street in Santa Cruz while the Legislative Building was being restored. In addition, it also sought the assistance of friendly countries to rebuild its collections.

According to Concordia Sanchez in her book The Libraries of the Philippines, many countries, mainly the United States, donated many thousands of books, although some were outdated and others were too foreign for Filipino readers to understand. Although rebuilding the General Reference and Circulation Divisions was easy, rebuilding the Filipiniana Division was the hardest of all. Independence and reconstruction (1946-1964) In 1947, one year after the independence of the Philippines from the United States, President Manuel Roxas signed Executive Order No.

94, converting the National Library into an office under the Office of the President called the Bureau of Public Libraries. The name change was done reportedly out of a sense of national shame as a result of World War II, with Roxas preferring to emphasize the library’s administrative responsibilities over its cultural and historical functions. Although the library was offered its original headquarters in the newly-rebuilt Legislative Building, the newly-convened Congress of the Philippines forced it to relocate to the old Legislative Building at the corner of Lepanto (now Loyola) and P.

Paredes Streets in Sampaloc, near the current campus of the University of the East. The Circulation Division, originally meant to cater to the residents of the city of Manila, was abolished in 1955 after it was determined that the city’s residents were already adequately served by the four libraries under the supervision of the Manila city government. That same year, it was forced to relocate to Arlegui Street in San Miguel, moving to a building then occupied by the Department of Foreign Affairs. During this time, much of the library’s Filipiniana collection was gradually restored.

In 1953, two folders of Rizaliana (works pertaining to Jose Rizal) previously in the possession of a private Spanish citizen which contained, among others, Rizal’s transcript of records, a letter from his mother, Teodora Alonso, and a letter from his wife, Josephine Bracken, were returned by the Spanish government as a gesture of friendship and goodwill. Likewise, the 400,000-piece Philippine Revolutionary Papers (PRP), also known as the Philippine Insurgent Records (PIR), were returned by the United States in 1957.

After many moves throughout its history, the National Library finally moved to its present location on June 19, 1961, in commemoration of the 100th birthday of Jose Rizal. It was renamed back to the National Library on June 18, 1964, by virtue of Republic Act No. 3873. Contemporary history (1964- ) Although no major changes occurred in the National Library immediately after its relocation, two significant events took place in the 1970s: first, the issuance of Presidential Decree No.

812 on October 18, 1975, which allowed the National Library to exercise the right of legal deposit, and second, the resumption of work on the Philippine National Bibliography (PNB) which had been suspended since 1941. For this purpose, the library acquired its first mainframe computer and likewise trained library staff in its use with the assistance of both UNESCO and the Technology and Livelihood Resource Center. The first edition of the PNB was published in 1977 using simplified MARC standards, and subsequently updated ever since.

The library subsequently purchased three microcomputers in the 1980s and, through a Japanese grant, acquired three IBM PS/2 computers and microfilming and reprographics equipment. The Library for the Blind Division was organized in 1988 and subsequently launched in 1994. Scandal arose in September 1993 when it was discovered that a researcher from the National Historical Institute, later identified as Rolando Bayhon, was pilfering rare documents from the library’s collections.

According to some library employees, the pilfering of historical documents dates back to the 1970s, when President Ferdinand Marcos began writing a book on Philippine history titled Iginuhit ng Tadhana (Drawn by Destiny), using as references library materials which were subsequently not returned. Having suspected widespread pilferage upon assuming the directorship in 1992, then-Director Adoracion B.

Mendoza sought the assistance of the National Bureau of Investigation in recovering the stolen items. Some 700 items were recovered from an antique shop in Ermita and Bayhon was arrested. Although convicted of theft in July 1996, Bayhon was sentenced in absentia and still remains at large. The chief of the Filipiniana Division at the time, Maria Luisa Moral, who was believed to be involved in the scandal, was dismissed on September 25, but subsequently acquitted on May 29, 2008.

Following Bayhon’s arrest, Mendoza made several appeals calling on the Filipino people to return items pilfered from the library’s collections without criminal liability. Around eight thousand documents, including the original copy of the Philippine Declaration of Independence among others, were subsequently returned to the library by various persons, including some six thousand borrowed by a professor of the University of the Philippines.

In 1995, the National Library launched its local area network, consisting of a single file server and four workstations, and subsequently its online public access catalog (named Basilio, after the character in Rizal’s novels) in 1998, as well as its website on March 15, 2001. Following the retirement of Mendoza in 2001, Prudenciana C. Cruz was appointed director and has overseen the continued computerization of its facilities, including the opening of the library’s Internet room on July 23, 2001. That same year, the library began digitization of its collections, with initial 52,000 pieces.


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