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Liberalism Essay Topics & Paper Examples

How Successful Was the Quiet Revolution

Freedom of speech and press, equality before the law, right to property and security, and the separation of Church and State. All of these things we take for granted as our fundamental rights but until the Quiet Revolution, these concepts were rare in most nations. The English-French relations have not always been easy. Each is always arguing and accusing the other of wrong doings. All this hatred and differences started in the past, and this Quiet revolution, right after a new Liberal government led by Jean Lesage came in 1960. This was the beginning of the Quiet Revolution. Lesage had an excellent team of cabinet ministers which included Rene Levesque. The Liberals promised to do two things during the Quiet…

Im a Liberal

Imagine you live in Europe in 1848. Write a letter to a friend, stating your political position —– conservative, liberal, or radical. Express your feelings about the uprisings and the future of Europe. Dear Bob, I’m writing you today to tell you about my political position. I’m a liberal. I know you want to know why I chose to be a liberal, so here it is. The definition of liberalism is the belief in the importance of liberty and equal rights. So I was thinking of things that fall under those guidelines and I came up with this as my explanation. I’m a liberal because I believe health care is a basic human right. I’m liberal because education and a…

Political Ideology

Upon entering my first semester at Southern Nazarene University I could not have told you my political ideology. I knew what my opinions, observations, expectations, and ideals were, but did not know the proper ideology that would define them. Through several courses that I have taken, I have become more informed as to the role that I would like to see the government take throughout society as a whole and in the economy. Upon reading the section of ideology in American Government and Politics Today: the Essentials I learned that the correct term for my ideology is right-wing Conservatism. I would like to see the government take action if necessary in the economy, yet let capitalism and the economy regulate…

Freedom: John Stuart Mill

1. John Stuart Mill: Freedom Freedom is generally defined, by a dictionary, as the condition or right of being able or allowed to do, say, think, etc. whatever you want to, without being controlled or limited (Cambridge). This means there is no interference or influence in ones’ actions or opinions by anyone else. There is no domination or dictatorial government who affects these actions or opinions. John Stuart Mill, an English philosopher and economist, gives a similar view on freedom as the Cambridge dictionary, and looks at the ‘nature and limits of the power which can be legitimately exercised by society over the individual’ (Mill, 6). Mill’s view of freedom, as he writes in his book On Liberty, is that…

Hobbes vs Locke

Locke Thomas Hobbes and John Locke were known as Social Contract Theorists, and Natural Law Theorists. The two men both had very strong views on freedom and how a country should be governed. Thomas Hobbes had more of a Pessimistic view while John locke had more of an Optimistic view. Hobbes and Locke believed in a type of Social Contract between the Government and being governed. Hobbes believed in Absolute Monarchs and Locke believed in the will of people being governed. Hobbes opposed constitutionalism because of his pessimistic appraisal of human nature. They both had extremely different views on government, but the bases of their arguments were similar. They both used reason to justify their ideas, rather than divine right….

John Locke Wanted Everyone To Have The

John Locke wanted everyone to have the “right to life, liberty, and property” which is used in the Declaration of Independence as the “right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. ” His ideas of the social contract, in which everyone in a society is accountable to one another, and the idea of governments deriving their power from the consent of the governed were both revolutionary concepts in 1776 that made their way into the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. The An? -Federalists in? uenced the conven? on during the ra?? ca? on process. The proponents of the Cons? tu? on took the name “Federalists. “Though those who opposed the Cons? tu? on actually wanted a more purely…

John Locke Biography

John Locke was born on August 29, 1632, in Wrington, Somerset, England. He went to the University of Oxford, where he studied medicine. After college he became a philosopher; writing and speaking on topics, such as political philosophy. His father was a country lawyer and was in the military, he served as a captain during the English civil war. John Locke was one of the Whig party founders, this party pushed for constitutional monarchism. He also wrote two books that were published in England; Two Treaties of Government and his Letter Concerning. Toleration while he was in exile in Holland, due to a failed assassination attempt on King Charles II and his brother. Two Treatises of Government showed his revolutionary…

John Locke Essay

John Locke, a philosopher of the Age of Reason and the Enlightenment, greatly influenced the American revolution and the French revolution. His beliefs were the social contract, natural rights, and the right of revolution. One of John Locke’s beliefs was the social contract. A social contract can be either a written or unwritten agreement between a government and its people. Social contracts usually contain a basic set of laws and agreements explaining how the country should be run. Examples of a Social contract are the US constitution and the Declaration of the Rights of Man. John Locke was a huge influence for both of these documents. Locke also believed that every person has natural rights. A natural right is a…

John Locke Research Paper

Throughout history there have been many philosophers that impacted the world. Philosophers such as John Locke have shaped today’s society in a number of ways. John Locke was extremely influential and has had some of the most lasting impacts on the ideas still to this day. John Locke has inspired a many of people throughout his lifetime and shaped the way for philosophers and great minds of the generations to come. John Locke was an English philosopher, born on August 29 1632, in Somerset, England. He was born into a Protestant family (Faiella 24). Locke’s mother died when he was an infant and he was raised by his father John, who is said to have had an influence on Locke’s…

Charles de Secondat, baron de Montesquieu

John Locke- 1. John Locke was one of the greatest philosophers in Europe at the end of the seventeenth century. Locke grew up and lived through one of the most extraordinary centuries of English political and intellectual history. The collapse of the Protectorate after the death of Cromwell was followed by the Restoration of Charles II — the return of the monarchy, the House of Lords and the Anglican Church. 2. Born 1632, died 1704. Locke’s chief work while living at Lord Ashley’s residence, Exeter House, in 1668 was his work as secretary of the Board of Trade and Plantations and Secretary to the Lords Proprietors of the Carolinas. 3. John Locke is known for the “Two Treatises of Government….

Liberal Theory

This memo outlines the liberal approach to theorizing international relations. Like realism, institutionalism, or non-rational approaches, it is a name given to a family of related theories of international relations. Here it will not be used, as many use it in international relations, to designate theories that stress the importance of international institutions. Nor to designate theories that stress the importance of universal, altruistic or utopian values of a liberal sort, such as human rights or democracy. Nor to designate theories favored by left-wing (“liberal”) political parties or policies in the US. Instead, it is a theory that stresses the role of the varied social interests and values of states, and their relevance for world politics. Liberals argue that the…

The Modern Rizal is in Your Heart

“There can be no tyrants where there are no slaves.” a quotation of Dr.Jose Rizal and also known as Pepe, a genius, well-traveled intellectual, the noble doctor, the artist, the sophisticate, a writer and resistance leader in the Philippines during Spanish colonization. He said it to break the consciousness of abuses that Filipino suffered in Spaniards and fellow Filipino. If Rizal is alive today, would he inspire us again in his literary works as a youth? What would he say to our country? In what character would he live? Is it in government official or a simple Filipino that follows the law? Would he fight for the rights of his fellow Filipino? Would he continue to write about the Filipino…

Why Is the Concept of Freedom so Contested in Political Theory

Freedom is an important concept in Western politics, strongly entwined as it is with ideas of liberalism. Yet, as suggested by the question, the concept is one which is hotly debated. Indeed, political agents attempt to control the political agenda through promotion of their particular definition. This essay will look at the ways freedom has been defined by different theorists over the years. It will also look at how freedom is linked with and explained through different theories and ideologies. It will then go on to look at how these different theories and ideologies may shape the conceptions of freedom we find in our daily lives. Different political theorists, writing in different times, often of political turmoil, have considered freedom…

1906 British General Election

The Liberals lapped on the conservatives weaknesses, and used that to their strengths. The leadership of Campbell-Bannerman proved as a success by throwing out accusations towards the Tories, like their methods of barbarism and ‘Chinese slavery.’ They also had young, dynamic MP’s and the gaining of Winston Churchill. The liberals opposed the tariff reform and supported free trade like many working class voters. The Tories had won 334 seats in the 1900 election but that went down to 157 seats in the 1906 election, which is a loss of 177 seats. But on the other hand in the 1900 election the Liberals had 187 seats but by 1906 election they had gone up to 401 seats, which is a gain…

Factors of Independence in Spanish America

Outline and discuss the main factors contributing to the movements of independence in Spanish America. The main factors contributing to the movements of independence in Spanish America can be seen to be influenced by international and domestic events, together with economic and socio-political conditions. These themes will be examined in considerable detail in this essay, together with the historical background which provides the foundation stone on which all movements of independence find their roots and ensures the uniqueness of each movement. The movements for independence were unique but equally many of the factors contributing to the movement are mirrored to a greater or lesser extent. The Enlightenment, which can be noted as a main factor which contributed to the movements…

Political Ideologies

Ideology is a highly contested phenomenon used in politics, social science and philosophical discourse. Heywood (2003, p12) defines ideology as ‘a more or less coherent set of ideas that provides the basis for organised political action whether this is intended to preserve, modify or overthrow the existing system of power.’ According to Freeden (2003) we are all ideologists in the sense that we prescribe to certain political views in our environment. He goes on to say that ideologies are competing interpretations of making sense of the worlds we live in. Ideologies look at what society should be like and why the society is the way it is. Leach (2002) states that the term ideology is quite problematic. He also defines…

Liberalism and Colonialism

Liberalism is both egalitarian and inegalitarian, it stresses both the unity of mankind and the hierarchy of cultures, it is both tolerant and intolerant, peaceful and violent, pragmatic and dogmatic, skeptical and self-righteous. Bhikhu Parekh examines the writing of John Locke and John Stuart Mill, two of greatest liberal philosophers. Locke state that the Indians had cultivated and lived on their land for centuries and it was their ‘rightful inheritance’. He asked the English settlers for information about the Indian way of life, and built up an impressive collection of books dealing with the European exploration of the Americas. The Indian way of life offered a realistic contrast to, and provided most valuable insights into, the nature and structure of…

How has life changed since 1800?

Life as we know it today in the modern world, is significantly different to the lives that our predecessors lived during the period 1500-1800. The changes across the centuries are the result of a process of advancements over time. This essay will examine life in the period 1500-1800 as highlighted in the work of George Blainey (2000) and will compare key differences of life in this early period, against life in the modern world today. Throughout this essay, the main focus will be based on three areas which have seen significant change over this period of time: the production of food, work practices and the standard of living. The advancements in these three areas, has led to societies living very…

Liberalism and Conservatism in America

In the political arena today, there are two crucial concepts governing the political philosophy, policy framework and legislations. Politics is categorized into conservative and liberal perspectives with liberalism supporting more government involvement in the development of policy framework that encourages affirmative actions which aims at uplifting the disadvantaged and the minority groups in the society. Liberals also call for an increased spending on the part of the government coupled by enhanced regulation and policies that redistributes wealth via taxation. Conservatives on the other hand calls for a greater dependence on the freedom of the market where the minority groups and the disadvantaged are able to support themselves. They advocate for lower taxation and less government regulations. Both liberalism and Conservatism…

Causes Of The French Revolution

On July 14, 1789 a large mob stormed the Bastille, and killed the commander and some other soldiers. The fall of the Bastille marked the beginning of the French Revolution, and was a symbol to the people of France representing years of abuse by the monarchy. Also, this event served as a wake-up call to King Louis XVI. Unlike any other short protest or riot, this event actually challenge to the regime. As the French Revolution progressed, French society underwent a transformation as feudal, religious, and aristocratic privileges disappeared and the ancien régime were abruptly overthrown under the fundamental principle of “Liberté, égalité, fraternité”. Although there are many causes to the French Revolution, the three main ones are: the mismanagement…

The development of the United States

What role did Enlightenment ideas play in the development of the United States? Give at least two examples to support your answer. The conconstitution used philosophers from the enlightenment era example is montesquies learned seperated powers and checks john locke used the ability of life and liberty’s and power How are the ideas of the Magna Carta evident in the founding documents of the US? manga carta set a precedent for the idea of a limited central governing body. briefly explain the role of legislative, executive and judical branches and how the power of the government is seperated among them. The legislative makes the law, executive enforces the laws, and judical interpret the law the power of government that is…

Short and Long term Causes of the French Revolution

The French Revolution beginning in 1789 redesigned the country’s political landscape and uprooted century old institutions. The movement was a result of a combination of various factors and played a critical role in shaping and showing modern nations the power inherent in the will of people. The Monarchy’s absolute rule and ancient regime were tested by the growing influence of the Enlightenment, which challenged traditional ways and ideas. Lavish spending and irrational mistakes made by the royal family worsened the nations ongoing economic debt, installing fear and famine in the lives of French citizens. In the face of a changing world, the old order succumbed to its own rigidity, falling to the ambitions of a rising bourgeoisie. These significant long-term…

Liberal Nature of Indian State

The state is being perceived as an “organised structural and institutional whole” epitomizing the power relations of society. The state in a developing society arise from historical factors and interacts with society through its decisive role in the economic process of the nation. To study the nature of any particular state, it is necessary to analyse to relation between state, power, and social classes and the purpose of the state. The liberal democratic form stands on the foundation of democracy. The liberal critique of the Indian state can be read in the writings of Rajni Kothari, Atul Kohli, The Rudolphs, Gunnar Myrdal. The state is associated with modernity. The idea of nation is also linked with the state and is…

Education in modern world

Education is an important tool that is applied in the contemporary world to succeed, as it mitigates the challenges which are faced in life. The knowledge gained through education enables individuals’ potential to be optimally utilized owing to training of the human mind. This opens doors of opportunities enables individual to achieve better prospects in career growth. Education has played a paramount role in the modern industrial world. This is attributed to the fact prospective employees must be qualified adequately to perform various tasks effectively. Industries entail resources that are sufficiently equipped with the modern technology to suit the needs and wants of the society. This thus, makes education to become a norm for services in all industrial sectors. The…

The advent of modern democracy

Does Rousseau’s _Du Contrat Social_ signal the advent of modern democracy? Or does it represent a dangerous recipe for the suppression of individual human freedom? Rousseau’s social contract is often likened to modern democracy, however, most political ideologies can be likened to one another in some form and one doesn’t have to dig deep before they find some major differences between the two ideologies. In his writing, Rousseau tries to develop an ideology that maintains humans individual freedom, but in a social way. However his ideology is full of flaws and is missing a key ingredient for implementation into human life. In order to understand these flaws one must explore the features of his ideology. Firstly in order to understand…

What success has liberalism sought to emancipate individuals

Liberalism has always fought for the rights of the individual as it was one of the founding principles of the liberal ideology according to John Locke in the 17th century. As well as the rights of the individual, John Locke also saw freedom and toleration as two other key components of liberalism. This question demands, however, an examination of the success of liberal policies towards the emancipation of the individual. During the course of this essay one will examine how liberalism has freed the individual during the 19th Century under Gladstone and during the liberal reforms of 1906-1912. Finally one will conclude that in concordance with R. Rurup that, “Liberalism is regarded as the truest protagonist of emancipation.” Reforms enacted…

Freedom of speech

Freedom of speech and the liberty to uphold one’s expression has long been the subject of many debates. It has taken centuries if not years for mankind to come to a point where many can easily voice their opinions without having to ponder over the consequences. But one should always know where to draw the line. Freedom of expression also needs to have its limits. Two of the masterminds who put forth their work on liberty and freedom of speech were John Stuart Mill and Jean-Jacque Rousseau. The concepts penned by Rousseau contradict those that were constructed by Mil; while the former focused on the functioning of the society as a whole, the latter advocated the rights of the individual…

Enlightenment thinking

The Declaration of Independence is the basis of our government here in the United States. When the authors of this document were writing it they included many references to enlightenment theories. Of these many theories three within the document can be attributed to John Locke, Jean Jacques Rousseau, and Thomas Hobbes. John Locke was a believer in the three natural rights of man, life, liberty, and property. In the Declaration of Independence Locke’s idea can be found throughout but one example is, “…It is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government laying its foundation of such principles, and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely…

A Comparative Analysis of Devlin and Mill

It can be assumed that if J.S. Mill and Lord Devlin ever coexisted some intoxicating deliberations regarding the role of morality in society would transpire. However, time has a peculiar habit of erecting boundaries amid centuries, allowing us only to presume discourse between the contemporary and the historical. Consequentially, each individual has an obligation to formulate his or her own appraisal established through the logistic unification of the particular instant and one’s own conception of idealistic righteousness. But the acquisition of an infallible and tangible philosophy with universal application would be as obstinate to create as it would to fathom. In such regard, the apparatus on which debate must rest is well constructed. If each were to believe in the…

Causes of The French Revolution

A revolution broke out in France in 1789 between the people of first and second Estates and the people of the Third Estate because the people of the Third Estate were treated incredibly unfair so they came together and took matters into their own hands. The three most important causes of the French Revolution were the bad economy and unfair taxes paid by the Third Estate, lack of voice and rights, and the idea of enlightenment and the inspiration of the American Revolution. The revolution led to the execution of the king and queen of France, Louis XVI and Mary Antoinette. The cost of food began to rise in the 1700’s because of deficit spending over the years on wars…