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Legal, Ethical, and Risk Management – You Decide Essay

I would like to begin by giving you a summarized scenario of assignment this week. My role in this scenario is an Event Leader for a tradeshow and exhibition. At the day of the event, I was standing by the loading dock with sweat dripping down my eye brow. As dozens of trucks and other vehicles line up for what seems like miles in the distance. As the sun continued to beat down on the loading dock, the union representatives begin to exchange words with me about who has had the jurisdiction of work.

Finally, I glanced at my watch and realized that the loads-in for the event was running two hours behind schedule, thus incurring thousands of dollars in overtime charges. And this was only the beginning of trials for the trade show. Once the doors to the exhibition opened, hundreds of buyers streamed in and promptly clogged the aisles on one side of the exhibit floor. For nearly four hours, buyers virtually ignored exhibitors on the other side of the exhibit floor.

A few minutes after the exhibition began. Several exhibitors complained to me that the other exhibitors were playing loud music and stepping into the aisles to bring more people into their booths. The legal counsel for the exhibition center John Reed He reminded the exhibit manager that it is illegal for an exhibitor to play music without permission from the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers or Broadcast Music, Inc.

Fred Meyers, the union representative of the exhibit hall, was having some heated words about the jurisdiction of work with me. Then I notice that I was running two hours behind getting the exhibit materials into the exhibit hall. Sam Smith, the Exhibition Manager, is getting concerned about the problems developing with loud music in some exhibitor’s booths, the labor jurisdiction of work for the union, the issue of overcrowding, and the activities conducted in the booths.

He requested that I give him a report so these issues would be solved before the next trade show which will begin following week. And these are the following objectives that I have to comply with his request as a report for me to submit. What should be included in the exhibitor’s policies, procedures, and practices and regulations? * Eligibility – Each exhibiting company must submit an application and contract for exhibit space or application for other options such as table tops displays, demo and safety plan.

If accepted this will become a binding agreement and highlights that our company has the right to deny access to any individual or organization it deems to inconsistent with the goals of the event and its members, rights to reject application that is incomplete and incompliance to requirements, completing the application and reserving booth space proves that exhibitors agree to all rules and regulation of the event and any decisions of the event organizers will be acceptable , and further , that said exhibitor will bound by such decision’s. Eligibility is conditions that an applicant or exhibitors must fulfill. * Indemnity – is a legal philosophy upon which the concept of most insurance policies rests. It’s a protection from loss and damage claims filed by another person. For example, an event goer may have injured themselves from a slip and fall and the exhibitors must have an indemnity insurance to compensate visitors.

And for the exhibitors indemnify and hold harmless all organizers of the event , its officers, directors and employees, including volunteers , and members from all liability to any person or persons for or by reason of any condition, defect operation of any apparatus, equipment, or fixtures furnished by the exhibitor in connection with his /her agents, servants or employees. This is to cover the exhibitors to help the visitors and event staffs to get restored to original state and helps the holder from suffering financial loss due to law suit. Exhibitors Insurance – May seems like a minor issue, but the organizers, venues and promoters take it very seriously. A simple trip and fall caused by exhibitors actions and if this policy is not in place can cost the organizers, venues and promoters a lot of money. All exhibitors must have Insurance are part of eligibility to exhibit for the event. * Security – We will not guarantee exhibitors against, nor shall it be responsible for, exhibitor’s materials loss or damage of any kind. All security that was provided by the event organizer is intended primarily for crowd control and credential verification.

Exhibitors must provide their own security personnel. * Booth Selections – this should be first come first serve, a rank number are assigned after dues are fully paid. Booth structure and decor guidelines – All aisles, passageways, overhead spaces, public meeting rooms, and other meeting facilities are controlled by event organizers. And exhibitors must adhere to the following. 1) No obstructive booth design is permitted, end cap Booths are not permitted and exhibitors may not sublet, assign or share any part of the space allocated. 2) Banners spanning the public aisle way are prohibited. 3) Displays, furniture’s, etc. In public aisle ways is prohibited. If the exhibit hall is not carpeted, it is the exhibitor’s responsibility to carpet their booth. 4) Multi story exhibits must receive proper approval from the convention center and / or appropriate local government agency.

5) The maximum height of any island or peninsula booth structure or hanging signs is 20”. 6) No live animals are permitted on the show floor, apart from authorized service animals. 7) No helium balloons are permitted or any high flammable materials on the show floor without approval from the event organizers and proof of contingency plan for safety and precaution. ) No automobiles or any type of vehicles are permitted on the show floor. 9) No offensive or inappropriate signs or decorations permitted. 10) Exhibitors must solicit only at the vicinity of their booth. Any space not partially occupied at least 30 minutes prior opening. Will be forfeited by the exhibitor and can be used by the event organizers in any manner, without refund, unless arrangements for delayed occupancy have been previously approved by the event organizer. All booths must be ready for the show by the walk through inspections.

The exhibitor agrees to maintain decorum in and around his exhibit space that will not offend or disturb other exhibitors. Exhibitors must police their own booths to be sure the noise levels from demonstrations or sound system is kept to a minimum and does not interfere with others. Demonstration areas must be organized within the exhibitor’s space so as to not interfere with any traffic in the aisle, and sampling or demonstration tables must be placed a minimum of 2 feet from the aisle line so as to prevent accidental injury to spectators.

Should the spectators interfere with the normal traffic flow in aisle ways, or overflow into neighboring exhibits, the presentation will be limited or eliminated. Booths must be staffed at all times the exhibit hall is open. How do you design the exhibit floor to avoid crowding, gridlock, and other crowd control issues? In the initial planning stages for major crowd events a number of considerations that we should addressed in advance. * Does the site have adequate access and staging area for large numbers of emergency vehicles in a major incident? Is access to, and road network within, adequate, or would emergency responders have to walk significant distances to the principal spectator areas? * Once on site, is there sufficient room for staging or maneuvering, to permit repositioning or redeployment of emergency vehicles as directed by the incident? * Due to the nature of road access would early arriving vehicles be prevented from leaving by gridlock produced by subsequently arriving equipment? * Is the location served by an access road or street which could be closed to the public and used only?

If so, what and where will be the de tour plan? * Do we have enough parking for all spectators? Is event staff in place to guide spectators where to park , and stop others when parking lot is full and give directions where else can park their vehicles. Are there nearby areas for overflow parking? Are shuttle busses desirable, feasible, or necessary? * Does the location allow for adequate crowd regulation, e. g. existing regiment seating areas, flow barriers, ect.? * Are spectator overflow areas available to prevent crush, should spectator turnout significantly exceeds expectations? Is the surrounding road network able to handle the anticipated spectator vehicular traffic? * If the parking lot is full, will the road network allow continued vehicle flow thus preventing gridlock? Using a swot analysis will also help prevent crowding, gridlock and other crowd control issues. What do you do if an exhibitor violates regulations? * A violation to the regulations of an event will result in cancellation of exhibit space during the event without refund. The event organizer reserves the right to impose limitation on noise levels and any other methods of operation which becomes objectionable.

An immediate removal of all persons and goods. The exhibitor shall pay all expenses and damages that may incur through the enforcement of this rule. How do you communicate effectively with union workers? * Approach managing all employees the same way, whether they’re represented by a union or not because effective management applies to both: being honest, communicating, well and often, listening to and resolving issues as they arise, recognizing and rewarding good performance, and creating an environment of trust and respect and that’s you would treat everyone as employee’s, vendors, and unions.

Union workers mean well in their actions and they are there to help. The best practice is to work with them as though they are an extra eyes and ears for you – like a partner helping to manage as we all would. Utilized effectively, they can be helpful ally to you. When opportunity arises, resolve dispute quickly and fairly. Formal grievance procedures are standard in most union contracts, but they’re there only if you are unable to resolve the problem or disagreement.

Speak to the people in your organization who can help you, like supervisor or human resources, then work openly with your shop steward’s and your employees. Know what you want because you will have to put it in writing. They value contracts and this replaces hand books and they are “hard and fast” rules that govern your relationship with these employees. Review your nonunion policy and make sure they are similar ensure fairness. Key is to be fair. What are some creative solutions to ensure that buyers visit underutilized areas of the exhibit area? Ahead of time before the event starts, use the power of the media to attract attention to your company’s display at the show. This section provides the strategies, tool and tips you need to create successful press releases and press kits. Try to conduct some press conferences as well to orient spectators of what are the exiting things to expect and once the event starts , spectators will come to your booth even it is located far, far away or back behind everyone else, spectators will come and see you for the specific things that they need.

I strongly believe that an effective public relations effort begins before the show, continues at the show and pays big dividends for your company if you keep it up after the show. Sales are not only a job it’s a relationship committed to do better for your company and all it takes in your part is your sincere friendship. You can start by sending e-mail blast to every prospect that you have and arrange appointments; just make sure you set your appointments not to close to each other and may clash cause problems. Have visual effects of your product on the show, customer’s loves pictures, better yet a presentation that explains your product.

Don’t settle with just free key chains and pamphlet’s because you can give them out all day long but what is important is they know what you are selling and understand the value of what’s in it for them. And to keep them lingering around you booth, I would suggest to be creative on obstacles of marketing, like preventing distraction to your prospect. Prospects on events usually come with family with kids; having toys or an amusement area for them and this will relieve the adults to focus on what you are selling. Do roulette games and door prizes that usually work in my personal experiences.

Refreshments and cookies never fails, they probably come to your booth first before anything else. And lastly , after the event is over ; make sure all your leads receive a follow up with requested information, asking them how was the event, and any suggestions, and what did you like most and the least using personal phone calls, direct mail, faxes or e-mails to respond back to you . and this will help also to retain contacts and invite them back for another successful event like how you did in the past and specially improved. Happy Selling!


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