Haven't found the Essay You Want?
GET YOUR CUSTOM ESSAY SAMPLE
For Only $12.90/page

Juan Bautista de Anza Essay

Juan Bautista de Anza, one of the many explorers who tried venturing into the Northern and Southern horizons, found his way to the lands of Mexico through the Sonoran Desert and then continued to California. Anza was born in the year 1736 at Mexico. Born Juan Bautista de Anza in Fronteras, Sonora, Mexico from a family of military commanders, it was expected of him to join the army of Presidio of Fronteras later on in his career, which he eventually did so. Later on in 1752 he joined the army and led the expedition that eventually landed from the ports of Arizona then continued to Monterey, California.

It was actually his father, Juan Bautista de Anza I, who had planned on the routing trip that he had embarked on. The elder Anza had confided in his son that they might be another route awaiting discovery in the lands of California. If not for losing his life, the elder Anza could have been one of the men that accompanied him in his endeavor. Anza volunteered in the army at the age of 18 and led his army on successive missions as he achieved the rank of captain.

The ambition that his father had once had led him to pack up and start the journey when the Californian estate was in a poor situation. The journey, an expedition to Alta California, had been applied to the viceroy and was approved by the King of Spain in January 8, 1774. During that time their routes could not supply for their needs and they needed more ways of sustaining their needs if they were to survive. He was 38 when he left Arizona to fulfill his idea that he could find a new route circling California.

According to records, his expedition composed of himself, 21 soldiers, 5 mule packers, 2 Franciscan friars, a Baja Californian Indian, 1 interpreter, 1 carpenter and 2 personal servants. This small army he led to discover the route he had sought. After than venture he made another quest, so reaching San Francisco. During his time many Americans were on expeditions trips to discover much of the lands and places that we know today. His crew was just one of the many who tried extending farther to discover new territories.

At that time many expeditions were funded by the King and other noble families in search for routes, ports, trenches and other ways of transportation that would ease their trade and help in their needs. Wherever they went he made sure to establish bonds with the aborigines, so ensuring them of friendly relations whenever they decide to come back. The journey began on 1744 when he was then promoted as lieutenant colonel on October 2, 1774, after his expedition had been closely monitored by the King of Spain himself and the Viceroy.

He came to Mexico with 34 men and left with 240 colonists. Anza married the daughter of Perez de Serrano, a Spanish mine owner in 1761. Unluckily, they had no children for whom he could have passed on his military trainings to. Before he could even claim his position as the assigned governor of New Mexico, he died in 1788 and was buried in Arizpe, Sonora before he was unearthed and moved to a marble mausoleum courtesy of the University of California. The nature of his death was unknown. A town has been named in reverence to him, aptly called Anza, California.

A building, a park and a landmark had been built also in his remembrance. Among the many reminders of his conquest are various schools and colleges named or called after his surname. The trail that he had travelled is well publicized in books and in the Internet in remembrance. Word Count: 623 Reference: Juan Bautista de Anza : Blazed the Anza Trail. (n. d). DesertUSA. 30 April 30, 2009. http://www. desertusa. com/magjan98/jan_pap/du_anza. html Biography: Juan Bautista de Anza. (2009). Answers. com. 30 April 2009. http://www. answers. com/topic/juan-bautista-de-anza


Essay Topics:


Sorry, but copying text is forbidden on this website. If you need this or any other sample, we can send it to you via email. Please, specify your valid email address

We can't stand spam as much as you do No, thanks. I prefer suffering on my own