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Jane Eyre Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Jane Eyre in the Opening 3 Chapters

Charlotte Bronte is the author of the novel Jane Eyre about an orphaned girl struggling throughout the novel to achieve equality and to overcome oppression. In the opening 3 chapters, Bronte emphasizes Jane’s loneliness, lack of familial affection and emphasizes her sensitive nature and inner strength. As we witness Jane being punished and neglected at the hands of her unfeeling aunts and left feeling isolated and out of place in her society. Firstly, we are introduced to Jane, hiding reading a book. This establishes her odd and lonely place at Gateshead hall. As not only is she separated from the rest of the reed family but Bronte explains that she is ‘happy’ and ‘feared nothing except interruption’. To feel safe…

Jane Eyre Character

“The humblest individual exerts some influence, either for good or evil, upon others” said Henry Ward Beecher. Everyone has some type of influence on another, whether it is big or small, good or bad. For example, outside influences, such as other characters, can affect a characters actions and thoughts in either a positive or negative way. In the novel Jane Eyre written by Charlotte Bronte, many characters influenced Jane, but Mr. Rochester and St. John Rivers had the most influence on her personality. Although the two men were very different from one another, they both had an impact on Jane’s transformation into a strong and independent women thought their actions, love, and influence. Mr. Rochester differs greatly with St. John…

Relationships in Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre

‘To what extent is Jane Eyre influenced by relationships in chapters 1-10 in the novel?’ Relationships are a key theme in Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre. Throughout the novel we see the rise and fall of Jane, all most importantly due to relationships. This starts primarily with her lack of relationship with her parents, as she was orphaned when she was very young, she has no idea what it is like to love or to be loved and we see her strive to find out these feelings throughout the novel, until finally she achieves it, but the journey towards this is deeply important. In chapters one and two we see the basis of Jane’s view of relationships through her connection with…

Jane Eyre’s Struggle Between Conscience and Passion

People can be held prisoner by their own feelings in an emotional box that confines them and controls them. Passion is the powerful, driving emotion that penetrates these feelings and compels one to break free of the box detaining them. In other words, passion is the motivation that drives one to take action against the shackles of their situation to create change in their life. All people have these passions, but what happens when these passions go against one’s conscience? A person’s conscience values things, like passions, as right or wrong, important or not important, or, significant or not significant. Thus, one’s conscience is like a barrier to one’s passions, and therefore, there is a constant struggle between the two….

Feminism & Postcolonialism in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre

As a representative work of a female author who was well ahead of her times, Jane Eyre can safely be regarded as the magnum opus of Charlotte Bronte. A literary career that spanned for a meager six years, it was really incredible as to how Charlotte Bronte could excel so much as a novelist so as to be able to pen down the account of a lonely and principled woman who has since been looked up as the very epitome of womanhood, let alone the politic of feminism. Moreover, elements of postcolonialism and their influence on individual behavior can also be traced in the polarized character sketching of Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason. In contemporary literature, gender and postcolonial discourses…

Jane Eyre and Class System

In Bronte’s time, the Victorian era, class system still played a huge role in society. People of a certain class would often look down on people from another class. Class was something you were born into. It was almost impossible to shift from one class to another. In the novel Jane Eyre, Bronte presents a very revolutionary character in that aspect. Charlotte Bronte is critical about the class system and tries to show that through Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre is not influenced by the social class system, because she shifts between several classes, has a strong character which enables her to ignore the traditions of the class system, and she does not judge others on their class, but rather on…

Symbolism in Jane Eyre

In the classic novel, Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte tells the story of an orphaned governess and her romance with Edward Rochester. As Bronte develops the plot, she subtly uses symbolism to represent ideas. Throughout the book, Bronte includes objects and events that symbolize a deeper concept. Symbolism is a key literary device when Bronte describes the relationship between Mr. Rochester and Jane. In one instance, the chestnut tree under which Mr. Rochester proposed is struck by lightning. “I faced the wreck of the chestnut-tree … split down the centre … The cloven halves were not broken from each other … the firm base and strong roots kept them unsundered below … they might be said to form one tree–a ruin,…

Feminism in Jane Eyre

Abstract: Charlotte Bronte’ masterpiece Jane Eyre symbolized a new era in the history of literature. It awakened women’s awareness to be independent. It brought about a completely new concept of marriage and of the value of life to a woman. That is marriage should base on true love, equality and respect rather than social ranks, materials or appearance. Marriage should be the combination of souls as well as bodies. The heroine of the novel Jane Eyre has successfully demonstrated the image of a woman who is intelligent, independent, kind-hearted and most importantly, brave enough to say “no” to the social conventions and live up to her principle in life. The author Charlotte Bronte is acclaimed to be a pioneer in…

The Red-room in Jane Eyre

It is not rare to encounter effective and incisive uses of space within nineteenth century literature. The famous novel _Jane Eyre_ by Charlotte Brontë is one of the finest examples of a fictional work with profuse uses of space in the period. The red-room in which the little Jane Eyre is locked as a punishment for her panicky defense of herself against her cousin John Reed is the first noteworthy use of space in the novel. Not only does it signify to the reader it is a Gothic novel they are reading but the room serves as a symbol for a number of meanings as well. Charlotte Brontë introduces the room – “one of the largest and stateliest chambers in…

“Jane Eyre” as a bildungsroman novel

Bildungsroman is a novel genre that narrates a hero or heroine’s process of psychological maturation and focuses on experiences and changes that accompanies the growth of the character from youth to adulthood. “The term “Bildungsroman” was introduced to the critical vocabulary by the German philosopher and sociologist Wilhelm Dilthey (1833-1941), who first employed it in an 1870 biography of Friedrich Schleiermacher and then popularized it with the success of his 1906 study Poetry and Experience” (Boes 231). To be a Bildungsroman, the hero or heroine in a novel will experience certain forms of pain or loss that pulls him or her away from either family or home and into the journey of desiring self-identity. At the end of the story…

Essay on Jane Eyre’s character

From her troubles with the abusive Reed family, her friendships at Lowood, her love of Mr Rochester and her time with the Rivers family, Jane’s character remains strong and vigilant despite the hardships she endures. Through the course of the novel, Jane’s character changes slightly but moreover reinforces itself as Jane uses people, situations and her personal experiences to gain knowledge, and assist her gaining her full character. From when she was a child, Jane had forthright values of herself and an example is when she reprimanded John Reed for attacking her with a book, Wicked and cruel boy! I said. You are like a murderer you are like a slave driver You are like the Roman emperors! She was…

Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason from “Jane Eyre”

I bent forward: first surprise, then bewilderment, came over methis was not Sophie, it was not Leah The shape standing before me had never crossed my eyes within the precincts of Thornfield Hall beforeIts seemed, sir, a woman, tall and largeIt was a discoloured face—it was a savage face. I wish I could forget the roll of the red eyesthe lips were swelled and darkShall I tell you of what it reminded me? …the vampire. If a person were to read this quote for the first time, his instinct would be of a stereotypical mystery or even horror book. But in fact, this comes from Jane Eyre written by Charlotte Bronte, with a plot nothing like what one might think…