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Internment Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Frongoch Internment Camp

Frongoch Interment Camp was situated in Frongoch in Merionethshire, Wales. It was a makeshift place of imprisonment during World War 1. It housed German prisoners of war in an abandoned distillery and crude huts up until 1916, but in the wake of the 1916 Easter Rising in Dublin, Ireland, the German prisoners were moved and it was used as a place of internment for approximately 1,800 Irish. Notable prisoners included Michael Collins and Arthur Griffith. They were accorded the status of prisoners of war. The camp became a ground for the spreading of the revolutionary gospel. The camp became known as ollscoil na réabhlóide[2], the “University of Revolution” or sometimes “Sinn Féin University”. The camp was emptied in December 1916…

Description of Japanese Internment Camps

Granada War Relocation Center Located in Amache (Granada) Colorado this camp had a peak population of 7,318 Japanese Americans mainly from California. This camp opened on August 24th, 1942 and closed on October 15th, 1945; within this time there were 120 deaths, and 31 volunteers to fight in the war. Conditions in this camp were primitive; there was no insulation or furniture in the barracks, and they were heated through coal-burning stoves. The Granada center became the tenth largest city in Colorado and had its own hospital, post office, schools, and stores. Gila River Out of all the Japanese internment camps the Gila River Relocation Camp was the most laidback and sympathetic to the evacuees, there was only one watchtower…

The Impact of Japanese American Internment in the US

The internment of hundred of thousands of Japanese Americans during World War II is one of infamous blotches in the United States’ experience with racial discrimination and human and civil rights violations. Although less discussed in the history books than the country’s fight against discriminatory practices against the African Americans, the incarceration of the Japanese Americans, nevertheless, has tainted the nation with guilt. The reason for this is that the incarceration did not have profound effects on the positive outcome of the war. Instead, it only meant the alienation and the violation of the members of a certain race that the US government judged with sweeping generalization as the enemy. The impact on the Japanese Americans was definitely negative. They…

Race-Based Internment and Korematsu

The internment of Japanese-Americans following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was shameful not only because of the fact that it was allowed to happen, but mostly because it was a national public policy joined in by all branches of the American government. President Roosevelt initiated the policy as the head of the executive branch by issuing executive orders declaring zones of exclusion for people of Japanese backgrounds, curfews, and even relocation programs to what some scholars have referred to as quasi-concentration camps. The legislative branch failed to protect the rights of these Japanese Americans; instead, “On March 21, 1942, Congress ratified and confirmed Executive Order No. 9066, which authorized criminal penalties for persons disobeying exclusion orders” (Justl, 2009, p….

Cynthia Ozick’s “The Shawl”

1) Describe how Ozick presents the setting. Why do you not receive a clear picture of how things look? Why does Ozick present the details as she does? The story begins with three people walking along a road, a mother holding her infant child, and a small child walking along side her. From Ozick’s description of both the mother, Rosa, and the young child walking beside her, Stella, the reader quickly learns that their journey has been unkind, leaving them feeble and hungry. Ozick explains that Rosa can “no longer feel hunger,” and describes Stella’s emaciated condition by comparing her bones to “chicken bones.” In the second paragraph is the reader given a sense of the circumstances surrounding the characters…

Comparison of concentration camps to japanese internment

Although we cannot compare the horrors of the Nazi Concentration camps to the American “Relocation Centers”, there are many similarities. Both of the groups of victims were of the minorities, and these cultures were somewhat of an enemy to the leader of their country. These groups (the Japanese in America nearly two thirds of which were American citizens, and the Jews, Gypsies, the Poles, Slovaks, Communists and other enemies of the state in Germany and Poland, many of which had served the very countries who were persecuting them during World War One) were all unjustly and unfairly treated for many years, until the liberation of the Concentration camps, and the release of the prisoners in the ‘relocation centers’. While some…

Fear and Foresight – Essay

Fear is “a distressing emotion aroused by impending danger” (Webster‘s dictionary). Fear is also the best way to disrupt one’s foresight creating corrupted decisions. To achieve this level of understanding, so that one’s decisions will be made effectively, one must understand him or herself well enough to be able to cut out the emotion and think rationally. Recalling experiences from the holocaust Fear tended to come when there was no hope or faith in the novel Night, by award winning author Elie Wiesel. Within this novel, about his own experiences during the war, Elie is thrown into a concentration camp where he is whipped, beaten, fatigued, starved, deprived, loses his faith, and ultimately loses his entire family all because he…

Loss of Identity in When the Emperor was Divine

“As we got off the bus, we found ourselves in a large area amidst a sea of friendly Japanese faces, “, stated by a once twelve-year old Nisei Florence Miho Nakamura in her account of her internment camp experience (Tong, 3). This initial experience was common among many Japanese, as they were uprooted from their homes and relocated to government land. Although, they had been asked to leave their homes and American way of life, many had no idea of what was to greet them on the other side. As a result of the unknown, many Japanese had no time to prepare themselves for the harshness and scrutiny they faced in the internment camps. Interment camps not only took a…

The ​Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford

​Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, written by Jamie Ford and published in 2009, tells the story of a relationship between Henry Lee and Kieko Okabe, two middle school aged children caught up in the persecution that was taking place during World War II. The tale, told from the perspective of Henry Lee’s flashbacks to childhood, is sparked as a result of the renovation of the Panama Hotel, a hotel that is metaphorically on the corner of “bitter” and “sweet.” The tale not only discusses the relationship between the two children, but follows them through the intricacies of dealing with an intercultural friendship, especially one considered so dangerous, during the time of cultural persecution and internment following the…

Are Zoos Internment Camps for Animals

Majority of people are familiar with the popular animation movie, Madagascar. The plot includes four spoiled zoo animals that escape to the wild and quickly find out that it’s not what they expected. Now this movie has quite the comedic take on a much bigger issue: whether the zoo is an internment camp for animals that should be shut down or not. Zoos are seen as a tourist attraction while the animals are used for the entertainment. Honestly ponder this question: who didn’t want to go to the zoo as a child and see Bobo the famous seal do silly yet entertaining tricks? The concept of the zoo takes away animal’s natural instincts to live in the wild; however, it…

Night by Elie Wiesel

There were many situations that Elie Wiesel has experienced which brought about a change in his character. In the memoir, Night, Elie Wiesel changes in response to his concentration camp experiences. The separation from his loved ones and the horrible conditions of these camps affected Elie greatly. The Holocaust affected Elie physically, emotionally and also spiritually. Elie changed physically by being a healthy human being into a walking skeleton. The Jews can be described as “skin and bones”. The Jews were extremely weak. They were forced to work at labor camps, which must’ve been extremely difficult. The lack of food served at the concentration camps, as well as poor quality of what was served made him that way. They were…