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Indigenous Australians Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Representation of Indigenous Cultures

Since the European settlement of Australia, the Indigenous people have been represented in a myriad of ways. The Rabbits (1998), an allegorical picture book by John Marsden (writer) and Shaun Tan (illustrator) and Rabbit Proof Fence (2002), a film directed by Phillip Noyce, are just two examples of this. Techniques such as music, changing camera angles and symbolism are utilised in Rabbit Proof Fence to represent the Aboriginal people as strong-willed and spiritual and in The Rabbits, exaggeration, different colour themes and perspective are used to portray the Aborigines as technologically inferior and overwhelmed against the Europeans. In both texts, the Indigenous people are represented as oppressed by the Europeans. The Rabbit Proof Fence uses techniques such as slow motion…

The Inequalities Surrounding Indigenous Health

Inequality in health is one of the most controversial topics within Australian Health Care. Inequality in relation to health is defined as being “differences in health status or in the distribution of health determinants between different population groups” (World Health Organization, 2012). Within Australia inequality affects a wide range of population groups; however Indigenous Australians are most widely affected therefore this paper will focus on how inequality has impacted their health. Research shows that Australia’s Indigenous people suffer from a multitude of social and economic inequalities such as inadequate access to nutritious food and health care, being socially and economically ostracized, cultural barriers, discrimination, inadequate shelter and sanitation, and insufficient education (Commonwealth Grants Commission 2001, p. 58-60; Australian Human Rights…

Effectiveness of Personality Tests on Indigenous People

Abstract This review seeks to evaluate the effectiveness of the standard personality tests on indigenous people. The two indigenous groups focused on are Native Americans and Aboriginal Australians. Several academic sources have been researched when creating this review. What was surprisingly discovered was the overwhelming evidence that presented a bias point of view outlining mainly the inappropriateness of personality tests. Introduction The term ‘inappropriate’ is universally defined as “not suitable or proper in the circumstances” (Brown, Robert T.;Reynolds 1999). Most standard personality tests among researchers are considered to be inappropriate for use with Aboriginal people in Australia and for Native Americans in the USA. (Brown, Robert T. ;Reynolds 1999). The following psychological assessment tests can be generally misleading to indigenous…

Issues Analysis- Indigenous People

As the British arrived on the land of the aboriginal people they hoped to absorb the aboriginal people into their culture to work in the new colony. The aboriginal people tried to avoid the settlers but as the land became more occupied contact became unavoidable. Governor Phillip wanted to avoid any unnecessary conflict so he treated the aboriginal people with kindness and ordered his soldiers not to shoot any of them. He captured many aboriginals and one of them was Bennelong. He wanted them to learn English and act as translators between the Indigenous groups and the British. There were clashes over the land and culture of Aboriginals and the British. Phillip ignorantly ordered his soldiers to fire at the…

Australian Aboriginal Essay

The city of Sydney is home to the largest Aboriginal population, which have maintained a living, continuous, day-to-day connection with the place for over 60,000 years. While the European invasion aimed to destroy any remains of this race, their strong spiritual presence remains unbroken. A major reason for the ongoing nature of this connection is that Aboriginal Peoples regard Sydney as a lifeline to their self-identity and it’s rich culture provides a constant reminder of the lifestyles of past generations. Even though traditions may not be widely practiced today due to increased urbanization and modernization, contemporary Aboriginal Peoples are still aware of the significance of their role in society as the First Natives of Sydney. Heiss (2001, p. 25) mentions…

Australian Aboriginal Art

Australian Aboriginal art, song and dance has been the corner stone of culture since the beginning of their existence. Having no form of written language Aboriginal art, songs, and dances passed down through the generations have been the heartbeat that has kept this ancient culture alive. Even though the art, medium, song, and dance of each Aboriginal tribe may be completely different, they all serve the same purposes; create ceremony, and to inform each member of the tribe of their history, spiritual beliefs, values, and expectations for cultural norm and behaviour. It is not until recently that Aboriginal art has stopped depicting Dreaming stories and has begun to be used for other purposes, such as self expression and emotion release…

Australian Aboriginal Art

The aboriginal people mainly used ochre for artworks, such as on rock, wood, bark and the human body.Ochre is mined from particular sites. It is a special type of rock that’s heavily coloured because of the iron oxide contained inside, and comes in a variety of colours: yellow, white, red, purple (it is identical to red ochre chemically but of a different hue) and brown. It could be used on rock (cave walls, or just big rocks), wood (shields, log coffins, etc.), bark and skin, and artifacts. To get the paint from ochre rocks, one simply needs to find a rich coloured rock, ground it up, and add oil.Other materials such as charcoal and plant colourings were used to make…

“Australian Rules” essay

Australian rules is set in a small rural town, where the relationships between the white townspeople and the Aboriginal people on the mission are complex, conflicted and marred by deeply entrenched racism. The local football team in many ways serves to represent the town, it reflects the conflicted relationship between the white people and the Aboriginal people- we begin to understand this as the film unfolds. Other themes inherent in the film are themes of family, love, loyalty and violence- the secrecy of domestic violence and the more overt forms of racial violence that spill out onto the public spheres of the football field and the pub. The opening narration informs us that half the football team is Aboriginal and…

The Australian History: Overview

Introduction Good evening, thank you for inviting me here this evening. I would like to discuss how Carmel Bird’s non-fiction book The Stolen Children-Their Stories (TSC) and Oodgeroo Noonuccal’s poem, “We are going” (WAG) gives us an understanding of how Australian voices reflect Australian values. Both texts explore the unfair treatment and effects of suffering inflicted upon Aboriginal communities and individuals by past government’s policies, as well as western society’s disrespect and ignorance. By analysing the texts, we learn about the values of egalitarianism from the perspectives of both indigenous people and the government. Egalitarianism means a fair go for all people where everyone is equal in fundamental worth and status. Getting this kind of insight into social and political…

Australian Aboriginal Culture

Introduction Aboriginals or indigenous Australians are the native people of Australia. Aboriginals were nomadic people who came to Australia about 40,000 – 60,000 years ago from Southeast Asia. Religion is a great part of Aboriginal culture. The essay answers these questions: What do Aboriginals belief? What is a Kinship system? What is Dreaming and Dreamtime? What rituals does Aboriginals have? Religion The Aborigines have a complex belief in creation, spirits and culture that gives a definite distinctiveness from any other religion in the world. Thousands of years ago, Australian Aboriginal people were living in accordance with their dreamtime beliefs- today, a majority of the Aboriginal community profess allegiance to Christianity, and only 3% still adhere to traditional beliefs. These beliefs…

Indigenous Education in Canada & Australia

INDIGENOUS PEOPLE AROUND THE WORLD HAVE BEEN A MAJOR TARGET FOR DISCRIMINATION AND THIS HAS BEEN THE CASE THROUGHOUT HISTORY, HOWEVER, THE INDIGENOUS PEOPLE OF AUSTRALIA AND CANADA HAVE QUITE RECENTLY FELT THE BURDEN. IT IS EVIDENT THAT DURING THE 1990’S TO THE EARLY 2000’S, A LOWER STANDARD OF EDUCATION RECEIVED BY INDIGENOUS AUSTRALIANS HAS A CLOSE SIMILARITY WITH THE EDUCATION RECEIVED BY INDIGENOUS CANADIANS. THE NON-INDIGENOUS RESULTS FROM STUDENTS IN BOTH AUSTRALIA AND CANADA HAVE EXCEEDED THE STANDARD OF INDIGENOUS STUDENT’S RESULTS WHICH HAS TERRIBLY DISADVANTAGED THE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES OF AUSTRALIA AND CANADA. THE NOTICEABLE DIFFERENCE IN EDUCATION RESULTS IS DUE TO THE UNFAIR TREATMENT OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLE IN AUSTRALIA AND CANADA, FROM TEACHING DIFFERENT AND DISHONEST CURRICULUM, MISSING…

Ritual in Indigenous Spirituality

Aboriginal Australians have been living in Australia for over 50,000 years. Aboriginal Australians have many important parts of their culture that have been passed on and lost during thousands of years of history. From the dream time and ancestral spirits, conservation of sacred lands, initiation, birthing, smoking and burial ceremonies. Practical and Ritual, Experiential and Emotional, Narrative, Doctrinal and Philosophical, Ethical and Legal, Social and Institutional and Material are the seven dimensions that where created by Ninian Smart. Ninian Smart was a Scottish writer and university educator that believed all religions have these 7 dimensions. In different religions some of these dimensions may have had a more or lesser importance and value than they might in other religions, but they…

The Inequalities Surrounding Indigenous Health

Inequality in health is one of the most controversial topics within Australian Health Care. Inequality in relation to health is defined as being “differences in health status or in the distribution of health determinants between different population groups” (World Health Organization, 2012). Within Australia inequality affects a wide range of population groups; however Indigenous Australians are most widely affected therefore this paper will focus on how inequality has impacted their health. Research shows that Australia’s Indigenous people suffer from a multitude of social and economic inequalities such as inadequate access to nutritious food and health care, being socially and economically ostracized, cultural barriers, discrimination, inadequate shelter and sanitation, and insufficient education (Commonwealth Grants Commission 2001, p. 58-60; Australian Human Rights…

Issues Analysis- Indigenous People

As the British arrived on the land of the aboriginal people they hoped to absorb the aboriginal people into their culture to work in the new colony. The aboriginal people tried to avoid the settlers but as the land became more occupied contact became unavoidable. Governor Phillip wanted to avoid any unnecessary conflict so he treated the aboriginal people with kindness and ordered his soldiers not to shoot any of them. He captured many aboriginals and one of them was Bennelong. He wanted them to learn English and act as translators between the Indigenous groups and the British. There were clashes over the land and culture of Aboriginals and the British. Phillip ignorantly ordered his soldiers to fire at the…

Indigenous People of Australia

Indigenous people of Australia, also known as aboriginal Australians from as early as 1789, are defined as the original inhabitants of the Australian continent, as well as the surrounding islands. They were original migrants from Africa, and have been residing in what is known today as Australia for around 50,000 years. Currently, the aboriginal population suffers hardships concerning economy and society as a whole. There are many matters taken into account when examining the current situation of aboriginal people in Australia. When England first colonized Australia in 1788, they brought along diseases such as measles, tuberculosis, and smallpox, which are estimated to have killed up to 90% of Darug, one of the aboriginal nations. Controversy immediately arose between the English…

Context of Indigenous health

Historical context and social determinants of Indigenous health There is a clear relationship between the social disadvantages experienced by Indigenous people and their current health status [1]. These social disadvantages, directly related to dispossession and characterised by poverty and powerlessness, are reflected in measures of education, employment, and income. Before presenting the key indicators of Indigenous health status, it is important, therefore, to provide a brief summary of the context within which these indicators should be considered. The historical context of Indigenous health Indigenous peoples generally enjoyed better health in 1788 than most people living in Europe [2][3][4][5][6]. They did not suffer from smallpox, measles, influenza, tuberculosis, scarlet fever, venereal syphilis and gonorrhoea, diseases that were common in 18th century…

Indigenous Disadvantage Issues

The indigenous society of Australia has been estimated to be around for tens of thousands of years. The contrast between non-indigenous and Indigenous society across all aspects of social and economical structures has been widely debated, reported, monitored and theorized. Indigenous Australians are significantly more disadvantaged then non-indigenous people in various social aspects such as health, education, employment, and income. This case study looks at the Indigenous disadvantages from both a post-colonial perspective and post-modern perspective through the portrayal of Australian media. An overview of the Indigenous disadvantages will be provided using statistics and media coverage. There will be an outline of Fanon’s post-colonial perspective on colonization. Furthermore, Foucault’s post-modern theory will be outlined, in which he argues that certain…

While a Variety of Factors Have Shaped

While a variety of factors have shaped the diversity of Indigenous Australian philosophy and practices across the Australian continent, one of the central characteristics of the Aboriginal worldview is the concept of the ‘Dreaming’. Outline some of the key aspects of this belief system and discuss the significance of this concept for Aboriginal people. ‘Indigenous Australia was and is a multi-cultural society’ (Seminar: Part 1, 2010). Throughout Australia there are many different Aboriginal groups, each with a unique identity. Although differentiated by landscape, language, geographical location, the ‘Dreaming’ concept seems to transcend communities (Stanner cited in Edwards, 2005). I acknowledge that ’ looking from the outside in’ will not give the richest understanding of the Aboriginal culture, however, it will…

Australian Aborigines

The kinship system is the social relationships that constitute the family connection by blood, marriage, or adoption; family relationship in a particular culture, according to Websters Dictionary. The Australian Aborigines kinship system determines how people interact with each other and it also determines their roles and responsibilities. Within the Australian Aborigines kinship system they use it for a lot more things then say our kinship system, “it is used for marriage funeral roles and ceremonial relationships. They have a system of classes which puts everybody in a specific kinship relationship. The Australian Aborigines have a cross–cousin marriage rule. Cross–cousins are the children of opposite–sex siblings, such as the father’s sister or the mother’s brother. One could marry his dad’s sister’s…

Indigenous Disadvantage

For the last 200 years Indigenous people have been victims of discrimination, prejudice and disadvantage. Poor education, poor living conditions and general poverty are still overwhelming issues for a large percentage of our people and we remain ‘as a group, the most poverty stricken sector of the working class’ in Australia (Cuthoys 1983). As a people, our rate of chronic disease is still 2. 5 times higher than that of other Australians, and Indigenous people in this country die 15 to 20 years younger than those in mainstream Australia. More than half of these figures are caused by chronic diseases such heart disease, stroke, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease and kidney disease. The majority of these chronic diseases are preventable and…

An Analysis of the Social Gradient of Health

“The demonstration of a social gradient of health predicts that reducing inequality itself has health benefits for all, not simply for the impoverished or deprived minorities within populations. ” (Devitt, Hall & Tsey 2001) The above quote from Devitt, Hall and Tsey’s paper is a relatively well grounded and well researched statement which draws on contemporary theoretical sociological concepts to support the assertion that reducing inequality is the key to improving health for all. However the assertion that the demonstration of a social gradient of health predicts that a reduction in inequality will lead to health benefits for all is a rather broad statement and requires closer examination. The intention of this essay is to examine the social gradient of…

Deadly Unna? By Phillip Gwynne

Deadly Unna? By Phillip Gwynne is a novel based on the fictional one year life of a fourteen year old boy named Gary ‘Blacky’ Black. The story shows a developing friendship between Gary, an Anglo-Saxon boy and Dumby Red, an Aboriginal boy. With this friendship Gary begins to understand his own morality with lessons of human dignity, racism, justice, death, courage, family and most importantly friendship. The story is structured around AFL and shows how sport can bring a divided community together every winter. One of the main structural themes in this novel is racism, discrimination and stereotyping of Aboriginal Australians in society. Indigenous Australians are one of the most disadvantaged communities in Australia and they are subject to many…

Historically Australian Indigenous Art Is Often Politically or Spiritually Motivated

Historically Australian art is often politically or spiritually motivated. This statement is proved by a number of indigenous Australian artists including, Nellie Nakamarra Marks, who uses traditional techniques and motives to relay her spirituality, and Tony Albert, who recontextualises mainstream items, to create a postmodern collection, challenging the idea of stereotypical representations in mainstream culture. All spiritual beliefs in Aboriginal culture relate back to the idea of creation and dreaming. The dreaming is the ongoing cultural and spiritual progression that informs identity and knowledge, which is expressed through traditional indigenous art. This reflects a spiritual connection to the land, which is represented by signs and symbols as well as other various techniques, which are unique to traditional indigenous art. Signs…

“What Are Some Issues That Indigenous Australians Still Face and Some Solutions”

We have all heard of the stolen generation in Australia’s history, and know of the issues and problems the indigenous Australians faced and although modern times for indigenous Australians are a lot better than previous times, they are still faced with many issues. These include education leading onto high unemployment, remoteness of some living lands, problems proving rightful lands and culture clashes of today. However some solutions I think will work are mentioned later on, which I think could possibly help future generations to come. Education and high unemployment are all issues that the indigenous aboriginals face. They have the lowest attendance rates and this leads onto high unemployment rates. Some aboriginals do not believe in European education, and others…

Evaluation Studies

Introduction Tobacco smoking is one of the main causes of major diseases in Australia and is still the largest single preventable cause of death (AIHW, 2008). Smoking counts for 15,500 deaths annually and higher mortality and morbidity are found among Indigenous populations (AIHW, 2008). In Australia, the smoking prevalence is higher among the Aboriginal People and Torres Strait Islanders. Approximately 34. 1% of Indigenous Australians are smoking, compared to only 19% in the general populations (ABS, 2006). The high smoking prevalence is highly correlated with the premature deaths and morbidity among Indigenous people, which mainly caused by cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and other diseases related to tobacco use, resulting in 18 years of life expectancy gap between Indigenous people and…

Indigenous and Non Indigenous

1. Indigenous people had an extremely close relationship with land. They worshipped and had ceremonies for the land. Without proper management of land it would have been very difficult for aboriginals to survive. The land was like a god to them, it was very important in their culture. Aboriginals didn’t harm the land instead they co operated with it, too help them survive. Aboriginals used land to help them survive, they didn’t use it for business or profits. No one owned the land instead the land owned them. The land was their home. Certain tribes were given specific land. 2. To non-indigenous people the land was no more than dirt on the floor. They owned the land. It was used…

Primary Health Care – Indigenous Australian Inequalities

Page 1 The World Health Organisation (World Health Organisation, 2008) states that the indigenous peoples of Australia are one of the most disadvantaged indigenous groups in the developed world. The health of the Indigenous population of Australia is an increasingly pressing issue. Current research and statistics reveals great inequality in many areas of health care and health status between the Aboriginal people and the general population of Australia. Couzos and Murray (2008, p.29) report that the Indigenous population has “the worst health status of any identifiable group in Australia, and the poorest access to health systems. ” This paper will examine the underlying historical contexts and contributing factors that have lead to the current disparity between the health of the…

Belonging: Indigenous Australians and Connected Family Relationship

Belonging is the enlightenment felt when man gains an awareness of themselves, which may or may not include affiliations to others & the wider world. This insight is found in the texts of ‘As You Like It’ by William Shakespeare, ‘The Last Samurai’ directed by Edward Zwick & ‘The Past’ by Oodgeroo Noonuccal. As You Like It initially accentuates familial & political usurpation, injustice, exile & the pain of being made to feel that no one longer belongs in either court or family. The physical level of ‘wrestling’ within the play metaphorically acts as an impulsive level of ‘grappling’ amongst civilisation. This diminishes any sense of connection amid urban society & in effect, the court is seen as a world…

Indigenous Australians Study – Groups Experiencing Inequality

517,000 people or 2. 5% of the total Australian population is ATSI. In 2006, the ATSI population had a median age of 21 years compared with 37 years for the non-Indigenous population. In June 2006, 32% of ATSI’s people living in major cities, 43% in regional areas, and 25% in remote areas. MORTALITY Life expectancy for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men is 67. 2 years where for non-indigenous men it is 78. 7 years. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, their life expectancy is 72. 9 years and 82. 6 years for non-Indigenous women Male Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander infant mortality in the Northern Territory was about 15 deaths per 1,000 live births, while female Aboriginal and…

Indigenous to Down Under: the Aboriginal Australians

Abstract This research paper explores the maltreatment by British colonizers of the Aboriginal Peoples of Australia. In that this ethnic group has suffered continued persecution and stratification in the land they rightfully own. Much of their rich culture has come near to disappearing under the Caste applied British oppression they have suffered since the late 18th century. This paper analyses the plight of this minority group based on ethnic stratification and conflict. This review will address how the conflict theory and applied stratification cost the Indigenous people of Australia much of their culture, religion and history. There will be added focus on how the remaining children of this near extinct but proud race are striving courageously to survive and preserve…