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Imperialism Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Marxist theories of Imperialism

Marxist theory of Imperialism: A critical survey has analysed the history of capitalism since 1500. The author critically analysed the development of capitalism and further provide the belief that capitalism is synonymous to imperialism. However, with modern day economic society, the arguments put forward by Brewer has become obsolete where there are standard norms of governing business in modern economic system. Introduction Marxist Theories of Imperialism: A critical survey written by Brewer (1990) is based on the emergence of the world and critical survey on the Marxist writing on imperialism. The book analyses the various aspects of capitalism in the world economy as being put forward by Marxist theory. The Marxist theory of imperialism is a book based on the…

Imperialism

Imperialism is defined as a forceful extension of a nation’s authority by territorial conquest, or by establishing economic and political powers over a weaker nation. Imperialism can have many effects on a nation, whether it’s redrawing political boundaries or a religious conflict. These two effects took place in Russia during the 1900’s, and the other in Germany 1933. The people behind these effects were Joseph Stalin for Russia, and Adolf Hitler for Germany. Joseph Stalin came into sole power of the USSR in 1928, after winning the confidence of the Russian people. This of course was after the death of the former ruler Lenin. Stalin was determined to make Russia mighty and powerful, to ensure that there would be no…

Imperialism

The concept of colonial power in terms of governance, political, economic and social empowerment from Western states had an influence on non-western nations. During this age of imperialism, a global economy emerged in which Western nations dominated the manufacturing sector and manufactured raw materials from non-western countries like Africa. One major impact of imperialism was modernization which led to introduction of new technology and mass production of goods and services. Many individuals from non-western countries sought employment from industrialized states which led to a change in the way of life. The local economies were transformed to modern improved economies through mass production of goods. This was made possible through development of communication and transportation networks. The Europeans urbanized plantations and…

European Imperialism and its Impact on Africa and Asia

European imperialism in Africa and Asia developed as a result of certain motivations which seemed to fit the prevailing world view following the Napoleonic wars.  Economic interests (ie, global expansion of domestic markets), maintaining the safety of trade routes, keeping colonies free from foreign influence and threats, national prestige in maintaining colonies, and finally, living up to a moral duty and the missionary and evangelical movements were all motivations given by European governments to justify its interference into Africa and Asia. As Europe became more crowded, as continental empires declined, and a more current world view came into focus, the Europe’s powers were motivated to find a replacement system that would best preserve their respective positions as a world economic,…

Isolationism, Intervention, and Imperialism

The annexing of Hawaii in 1990 is an example of imperialism. The United States had been looking to take over some small other countries for some time before attempting to annex Hawaii. But at that time, imperialism had not grown enough to make it sucsessful. This is an example of imperialism because the US used their power to threaten and take over the smaller country for their own needs. This event started as a peaceful agreement between the United States and the Queen of Hawaii, allowing American Citizens to settle in Hawaii. Soon the United States realized Hawaii would be the location they needed to establish navy bases in the Pacific. The US managed to annex the country by threatening…

Globalization or Cultural Imperialism

The concept of cultural imperialism is not a new one. The idea of winning the hearts and minds of another society via exporting values and cultural tendencies dates back to at least the Roman Empire (Rothkop 1). The basic concept of cultural imperialism is that a stronger, usually larger and with more military might, has forced its culture on another nation, usually a smaller and less politically powerful nation. Cultural imperialism can be either deliberate, as a conscious effort of the more powerful society, or as an unintended consequence of the larger society’s actions. Generally, those who use the term cultural imperialism use it as insult against the larger nation. The claim is that cultural imperialism, sometimes also referred to…

Cultural Imperialism Is Power

“Cultural imperialism” is what takes place when a large, powerful, economically dominant nation promotes, imposes, or otherwise spreads its own culture to less powerful, economically subservient nations. A. Examples Cultural imperialism is already evident throughout the world: Palestinian Arabs chanting “Death To America” do so while wearing Nike tennis shoes and t-shirts; Brazilians who curse George W. Bush nonetheless cheer for Madonna and Britney Spears; Turks who protest the ongoing occupation of Iraq may still stroll into a local McDonald’s for lunch; MTV reports 280 million subscribers throughout the world (Galeota, 2004). B. Hows and Whys In 1984, Harvard business professor Theodore Levitt warned that “the world’s needs and desires have been irrevocably homogenized,” adding that those companies that attempted…

Culture and Imperialism, a Review of Edward Said

Edward Said remains one of the best selling and well known of the social and literary theorists that deal with identity and nation in the post-colonial global setting. This field is saturated with work dealing with culture and identity formation, post-modern “epistemic communities,” and most importantly, the relationship between context (ethnic, religious or economic) relative to the formation of such communities. There can be no question that the reading of Said’s book must take place within the context of the American neo-conservative drive to dominate the planet in the name of a vaporous “democracy,” or even “free markets. ” And for this reason, it is important for the author to establish his view on the United States as a “conqueror”…

Themes in a House of sand and fog

Kathy finds out how tenuous is the dream of home ownership. Through no fault of her own, she is evicted from her legally owned home by a bureaucratic clerical error (the tax office was seeking payment for the house on Biscove Street, not Bisgrove Street). Although Kathy cannot afford a lawyer, she is assisted by a Legal Aid lawyer, paid for by the state. Although Kathy’s lawyer has filed suit against the county whose tax office made the error, Kathy has nowhere to go after she is evicted and, were it not for Lester’s help, would become homeless. Behrani sees an ad in the legal section of a newspaper for the auction of the Corona house; he gets the house…

Effect of imperialism on the Rwandan genocide

There is a lot of history in a small country like Rwanda. The original inhabitants were the ethnic Twa. By the 10th century, Hutu farmers were established there. Tutsi warriors with cattle arrived after the 14th century. Tutsi formed a monarchy by the 16th century. All tribes shared a common language and culture, and there were no race issues until the 20th century. (4) Germany was the first European country to colonize Rwanda in 1899, administering it indirectly through the existing king. Belgium took control in 1916, during World War I. Belgium received it as a League of Nations mandate in 1919 and continued indirect rule but restructured the system to increase ethnic divisions. (4) The Belgians favored the Tutsi…

The Aims of the League of Nations

In 1919 Woodrow Wilson stated, “I can predict with absolute certainty that within another generation there will be another world war if the nations of the world do not work together to prevent it.” The League of Nations was Wilson’s idea in keeping the world at peace and it had four main aims: to stop war, to disarm, to improve people’s lives and jobs and to enforce the Treaty of Versailles. Even though the aims of the League are presently clearly ? historians still argue that the real aims of the League are not what they appear to be. The League believed in keeping peace all around the world, showing shown clearly through its name the League of Nations. However,…

The Impact of European Imperialism in Africa

There are several reasons why the European nations competed with each other to gain colonies in Africa. They all wanted to gain power and prestige. The more territory that they were able to control in Africa the more powerful and important they thought they could become. Africa was tremendously rich in natural resources, which could be brought to Europe and turned into manufactured goods. Europeans also needed markets for their manufactured goods. These goods could be sold in Africa for large profits. Often a European nation would take over territory in Africa simply to prevent another European country from taking it. European rule came to Africa in many different ways. Sometimes a European trading company made agreements with Africa chiefs…

How did imperialism affect China?

How did imperialism affect China? Imperialism had a major affect on China. The Opium War played a major part of this. The opium war was provoked by the problems with European countries and China. British were getting tired of doing outside trading and wanted to trade directly with China. China had little need from the West. As a direct result the smuggling of opium began. Opium was forbidden in China except for medicinal use. The war was fought to determine the relations between China and the West, and as a result China was forced to reevaluate her position as the center of the world. The treaty of Nanking ended the first Opium war. As a result to China’s distant methods…

Suggest the political and artistic implication

Suggest the political and artistic implication of placing the conclusion of Passage to India within the Orientalist paradigm. Ans: It might seem scandalous to reduce E.M.Forster’s A Passage To India , complex and multi-faceted work considered one of the greatest novels of the 20th century, to such a concise formula. But we humbly offer up this mantra as our homage to Forster’s novel as a passage into his Passage To India. Published in 1924, when the cracks in the British Empire were just emerging , the novel centers on the trial of an Indian doctor accused of raping an Englishwoman.The work was the last of Forster’s novels, and a thematic departure for him as well. Previous novels such as A…