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Human Essay Topics & Paper Examples

Human body

A trip to the cinemas or even to the local bookstore will reveal the present generation’s fascination with the folkloric undead. This fascination, however, is not a new one as most of the present “lovable” undead characters are actually just old characters that have been given a make-over. From the charismatic vampires of Anne Rice in her Vampire Chronicles series to the morbid and gruesome zombies in the films, the folkloric undead have taken on a new shape from the early 19th century. Perhaps, the change can be attributed to a more imaginative set of authors and writers but then again much of this change can also be attributed to the developments in science and medicine which have allowed for…

Plato and Aristotle

Plato and Aristotle were two philosophers who made an impact on philosophy as we know it as today. Plato is thought of as the first political philosopher and Aristotle as the first metaphysical philosopher. They were both great intellectuals in regards to being the first of the great western philosophers. Plato and Aristotle each had ideas in how to better life by improving the societies in which they were part of during their lives. The views of Plato and Aristotle look different but they do have some similarities to them. Plato is mostly known for his Theory of Forms and Aristotle is known for his thoughts in universals. Even though they both thought a bit differently they did agree in…

Authentic Freedom

A human being is free to do as what they please! That’s just an interpretation of authentic freedom. All too often humans think of freedom as a free for all. Authentic freedom is does not mean doing what one wants when one wants to whom one wants, but rather it means, understanding who one is , that a human being is not alone and here to contribute to society. Authentic freedom is a paradox, one that will make you think, but not a contradiction. The more freedom a human being has, the more one is called to respond. “Freedom is exercised in relationships between human beings. Every human person, created in the image of God, has the natural right to…

Human brain

Blood is the elixir of life. Without blood, the human body would not be able to perform several of its normal functions. In fact, blood can be said to perform functions that are relevant to the cells, the heart, the brain and the organs. It acts not only as a medium for transporting nutrients but also as a medium for taking out the trash so to speak. Containing necessary minerals, glucose, iron and oxygen, the blood is essential for the survival of the body cells, as well as the organs. If the blood was not able to carry these nutrients, the body would go into shock and not be able to function. Therefore, it can be said that the first…

Existentialism and Human Nature

Absolute individuality and absolute freedom: the basis of all existentialist arguments. The existentialist’s conceptions arise from their held views that since we are all ultimately alone, we have absolute freedom over our nature. Existentialists emphasize the “free and conscious self” which opponents constantly attack, exclaiming that there is a “higher power” enabling our consciousness. But are humans so simple? Can things be explained solely on blaming ourselves or another being for our nature? The existentialist generally believes in a sole existence; meaning that we are alone in the world, and that we have no one but ourselves. They also believe in the human being’s capacity to feel more than one kind of pain, and that there are three different levels…

The Psychology and Philosophy of Education of Ayn Rand in The Comprachicos

Ayn Rand writes mainly about the status quo and what and who is to be blamed for such circumstances. She talks of a miseducation so ingenious that when one reads about it one simply gets baffled as he is forced to look into his own experiences from the home, to the school, to the Church and in the province or in the city. One can expect to see various parallelisms with how he is brought up and what he is usually told by his superiors. The reason for these apparent similarities, I think is that aside from the ‘system’ that almost each person is forced into; there is something common in every one of us. This is what makes us…

Impact of Selfishness on Personal Life

Every day, people make several decisions that more or less influence their live. However, it is necessary to consider other people and results before the decisions were made, since selfish decisions can cause lots of problems. The selfish choices that selected by the main characters in both “On the Rainy River” and “A Pair of Silk Stocking” cause regret and raise conflict between the main characters and themselves . Regret can be caused by selfish decisions. On the one hand, O’Brien, the narrator of the “On the Rainy River” felt guilty and worried about his families during the way to Canada because he fled away from the war: “I would go to the war–I would kill and maybe die –because…

Relativism and Morality

Relativism is the idea that one’s beliefs and values are understood of one’s society culture or even one’s own individual values. (Mosser, 2010). With that being said everyday a person from a culture conducts some kind of moral choice. The moral choice that he or she chooses may be viewed as right or wrong by other cultures. In this paper “some moral minima” by Lenn E. Goodman there are views of different aspects of morality and relativism and Goodman argues that certain things are just wrong. (antiessays. com). Goodman discusses issues on subjects such as slavery,genocide,terrorism,murder,rape,polygamy, and incest. I agree with Goodman on these issues because these is never a good time to kill for the sake of killing, rape…

Morality and Relagion

Morality refers to a set of principles that guide an individual on how one evaluates right and wrong. People believing in religion consider morality is shaped by religion because they believe that morality can be understood only in the context of religion; therefore, those religious people insist if there were no religion, people would be out of control. However, religious beliefs give people a wrong definition of moral value, indeed, morality is shaped only by instinct and environment. Regardless of religion, morality comes from instinct. Human beings are social creatures; they have to live in groups for reproduction and survival that has not changed at all since the ancient time. Looking back to history, people live in groups to share…

Concept Of Morality

Examples a. Moral – protect the weak, stand up for the downtrodden, love everyone as much as you can and more every day, jump on any and all opportunities to save an innocent life, do your best to live up to your potential for the betterment of the world. Doing what is right because it is right, feeding a starving child, giving your coat to a homeless person, taking foster children and caring for them well, standing for what you know is right. 2. Amoral does not concern with any moral standard. Examples a. Amoral – chew gum, play baseball, speak French, swim in the ocean, jump in a puddle, not caring if something is right or wrong. Driving, shooting…

Morality Play

Cudgels- short thick stick used as weapon (n. ) mea maxima culpa -my mistake, my fault humani nil a me alienum- I am a human being, I consider nothing that is human alien to me. tonsure- the act of cutting the hair or shaving the head. artem illam ignominiosam- the art of her disgrace malodorous- an unpleasant odor; foul-smelling retinue- a group of advisers, assistants, or others accompanying an important person leman- a lover, sweetheart or paramour pretium- price ignorantia Juris non excusit- ignorance of the law does not excuse ubi stabilitas ibireligio-where ever stability is, there will be religion. Jongleurs- medieval wandering entertainers who played instruments, sang and danced, juggled, and performed plays. brawlers- a noisy quarrel, squabble, or…

Morality and Obligation

1. Two preliminary steps taken, that may be necessary, before one can intui? vely appreciate the rightness of an ac? on are thinking fully about the consequences of an ac? on. In other words, think before you act. Also give thought (considera? on) to the persons involved in said ac? on or your rela? on(ship) with the persons involved. 2. An ac? on is considered morally good in addi? on to being right when it is the right thing to do, while also stemming from a good place. When the person or “agent” performs said act because it is right, from a feeling of obliga? on, a morally good act is also right. 3. According to Prichard, an ac? on…

What Is Morality

I’ll tell you that morality is probably one of the biggest, most confusing things to look at when you need to write a paper about it. After some deliberation, I have concluded a few things about morality and what it is. Morality is one of those words that you don’t hear very often, and use even less frequently. It is perfectly described by Webster’s Dictionary as a set of guidelines that govern a person’s actions. Without such a code, anarchy would rule supreme. Human beings are human because we can limit ourselves and our behaviour. Moral values are a byproduct of a society that must live together. Even though in Mother Nature the only restricting factor is that of reproduction…

Morality and Religion

There is a close relationship between morality and ethics but they do not mean the same thing. On the other hand, anti-morality and anti-nature are aspects, which negate vital instincts. Friedrich Nietzsche is a renowned philosopher who criticized social laws, religion, and honorable in a radical manner. Nietzsche argues that, “anti-nature refers to the idea of allowing human beings to coerce others into adopting their beliefs and morals” (Friedrich 404). Friedrich Nietzsche had a personal belief that morality is anti-nature. In fact, Nietzsche states that, “Every naturalism in morality-that is every health morality-is dominated by an instinct of life” (349). Indeed, Nietzsche helps us to define the idea of anti-nature by asserting that a human being is seemingly refuting the…

Morality – Ethics

1. What are the fundamental questions which ethics tries to resolve? Ethics seeks to resolve questions dealing with human morality—concepts such as good and evil, right and wrong, virtue and vice, justice and crime. 2. Distinguish a human act from act of man. The difference between human acts and man acts is that human acts are a free will decision. This includes knowledge, freedom and voluntarism When modifiers come into play, then it makes the act become the act of man. The elements are ignorance, passion, fear, violence and habits. You act simultaneously with your feelings. A human act is an action that is considered to be carried out voluntarily, whereas an act of man is an involuntary action. The…

Can Computer Replace Human Beings

Many of us think that computers are many times faster, more powerful and more capable when compared to humans simply because they can perform calculations thousands of time faster, workout logical computations without error and store memory at incredible speeds with flawless accuracy. Human Brain: We can only estimate the processing power of the average human brain as there is no way to measure it quantitatively as of yet. If the theory of taking nerve volume to be proportional to processing power is true we then, may have a correct estimate of the human brain’s processing power. * by simple calculation, we can estimate the processing power of a average brain to be about 100 million MIPS (Million computer Instructions…

Explain the problems of religious language

Explain the problems of religious language. (30) Some words used within religious language may be viewed as contradictory to our inherent beliefs and logical view as human beings one example of this would be the story of the ‘virgin Mary’ as there is no logical explanation to how she gave birth. Many of the words used in religious language are also metaphysical and have no physical representation therefore it is very hard for us as humans to fully comprehend the ideas they are expressing. An example of this is ‘God is timeless’ as we as humans live in a world where time is very much present so humans’ attempting to understand the phrase causes problems as it is outside of…

Comparison of Freud’s and Plato’s Aspects of Human Character

Aspects of human character have been discussed in a number of fields; inputs from the philosophical and political perspectives can be identified by how human character is in place with respect to the society whereas concepts from the psychological field can be observed to focus more on the individual and its relationship with his environment.  Such is demonstrated by Plato in his The Republic which can be seen to potentially contrast with Sigmund Freud in his discourse in Civilization and its Discontents.  Plato had apparently came up with literature describing a functional society according to certain controls needed in order to establish a civilization according to certain ideologies such as justice, authority, and the ideal state, among others.  Freud, on…

The Meaning of Life -Opinion

My beliefs on the meaning of life in religion and interpretation of such things. In approaching the question of ‘the meaning of life’ we have to examine the nature of meaning itself. Meaning, is by definition the point, or the intended goal. Consider the point of humans and the universe as seen from monotheistic religion. If life and the universe is some sort of toy or form of entertainment for some greater being, his point, his own entertainment, would then be the meaning of humans and the universe. Consider the goals of the deities of various cultures. Some strive for a balance between the forces of ‘good’ and ‘evil’. This balance seems to simply be a choice of the deity,…

Humanism and the Meaning of Life

In his piece “What is Humanism”, Fred Edwords explains humanism as a type of philosophy that emphasizes reason, scientific inquiry, and human fulfillment in the natural world, and often rejects the importance of belief in God. He describes the different categories of humanism that are common and the beliefs they hold. In Richard Taylor’s “The Meaning of Life”, thoughts are given on where meaning comes from in life if a meaning is even present. He explores the story of Sisyphus to illustrate how a life could be meaningless and then explores the idea that everyday life today is ultimately meaningless as well. The degree to which the article by Taylor fits the description of Humanism in the Edwords’ piece is…

The Meaning of Life. Essay

Many people have debated over a proper way to denote a meaningful life. By reading the Bible, one side may argue that a life lived without belief in an afterlife is meaningless. The other side may oppose this by stating that a life lived in the pursuit of happiness as attributed to each person’s views is certainly meaningful. The latter may be correct, but it is possible for both arguments to be accurate when considering details outlined in this highly influential text. This analysis will convey such details, hopefully bridging the gap between lives that are meaningless and meaningful, respectively. Happiness is very important for any individual to live a valuable life. When possessing happiness, people are encouraged to do…

The Meaning of Lives

In her article The Meaning of Lives, Susan Wolf, a moral philosopher and philosopher of action, investigates whether meaning can exist in lives without postulating the existance of God. Wolf establishes her position on this philosophical question from an agnostic perspective and rationally argues that such a question can in fact “fit within a negative or agnostic view about the meaning of life” (Wolf 63). With this paper, I will first summarize the prominent points of Wolf’s article then highlight and expound upon areas of her argument that contradict her line of reason. Lastly, I will introduce the theistic perspective on meaningful lives along with presenting Wolf’s reason and argument as supporting evidence for the theistic view. In the Meaning…

Meaning of life, Life

Suffering is an inevitable part of life. We all live in this big labyrinth of suffering. Th only way out of the labyrinth is death. ” To live is to suffer, to survive to find meaning in the suffering. Few peopl e actually commit suicide to liberate themselves form suffering. Most people find meaning or purpo se for their life so that they have the motivation to live on. Some think that suffering make them wis er, some think that suffering is a test of faith, there will be rewards for them in the after life if they c an endure the suffering on earth. Some people couldn’t understand but keep going on with their life for their loved ones….

Soapstone: Meaning of Life and Daffodils

1. Speaker: The person who is saying the poem is a person who hardly admires nature for its true beauty. 2. Occasion: A trip to the lake inspired this poem because there he saw all these daffodils by the lake and compared them to stars. 3. Audience: The audience for this poem are all those who do not appreciate the beauty of nature and more so to the well-educated. 4. Purpose: The reason Wordsworth wrote this poem was to express the beauty of all nature and how we take its beauty for granted. He is wishing to convey that we should acknowledge nature because we are nature and nature is in all of use. Also that we should admire its…

What’s the meaning of life?

Life, the most precious thing I have ever seen, that always comes to an end which we don’t really want to, but do we live for a precise purpose? I am sure that we do otherwise we wouldn’t be here in the first place. I never thought that asking myself” what is the meaning of life? ” will be this difficult to answer until I started writing this paper. I think the meaning of life is experience and knowledge. Experience and knowledge are two different things but when you take a closer look at them you will realize that they are actually really close or even maybe the same thing. Human life has always been around knowledge. We always want…

On the Meaning of Life – John Cottingham

What is our relationship with the universe – who are we and how did we come to be seems to be the ultimate question of the meaning of life. This question has always sparked powerful debates between the views of the religious and modern science. Many believe this topic is a one-sided issue where these views cannot co-exist with one another, either one’s a theist, believing in God as the soul creator and ruler of the universe or an atheist, disbelieving of a supreme being or beings. But in actuality, modern science does not count against the nature of a divine creator behind the universe. So as modern science offers an account of how things happened, religious beliefs account for…

Ethics – Meaning of life

1. The Meaning of Life Connect your ideas on the essential meaning of life to the views of at least one philosopher. This philosopher can be someone whom we studied or can come from an outside source. You might connect your ideas in a harmonious or contradictory way. Utilize the academic resources aligned with this course to find a philosopher that coincides with or contradicts your own ideas. Your initial post should be at least 150 words in length. Support your claims with examples from this week’s required material(s) and/or other scholarly resources, and properly cite any references. Respond to at least two of your classmates’ posts by Day 7. What gives human life meaning? I think Immanuel Kant said…

Happiness: Meaning of Life

While happiness in a scientific sense can be explained as the chemicals released throughout our bodies, it still doesn’t tell us fully why these are chemicals are sent and what it means in the overall human experience in scientific terms. From an artistic perspective happiness is the largest component in providing self-worth to one’s self and with its absence we see people delve into the depths of depression losing the motivation and ability to perform tasks and live life to its fullest, and in some extreme cases losing the will to live. On the opposite side of depression there is euphoria and this is where people experience moments in their life that they remember and cherish during times of reflection,…

Existentialism – God

What is the meaning of life. The meaning of our lives, the purpose, and the dreams both dashed and realized, and the expectations forced upon us by others. In other words how do you “translate” what life is? “Translation” means to explain in simple terms. What is it supposed to be about? There are different answers for different people at different times in their lives. A person’s lifetime is filled with self-examination. Why am I here? What am I doing? Is this as good as it gets? You have a beginning. You’re in the middle, and your story hasn’t ended yet. If one would recognize the greatest things we have in life, they would not be asking this question. These…

The Meaning of Life -Opinion

My beliefs on the meaning of life in religion and interpretation of such things. In approaching the question of ‘the meaning of life’ we have to examine the nature of meaning itself. Meaning, is by definition the point, or the intended goal. Consider the point of humans and the universe as seen from monotheistic religion. If life and the universe is some sort of toy or form of entertainment for some greater being, his point, his own entertainment, would then be the meaning of humans and the universe. Consider the goals of the deities of various cultures. Some strive for a balance between the forces of ‘good’ and ‘evil’. This balance seems to simply be a choice of the deity,…